WI Mining Law & Radioactive Waste Dumping Setup
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Rescooped by Karen Harvey from FUKUSHIMA 311 WATCHDOGS
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Radioactive Material: You Can't See It, and You Can't Smell It Either - YouTube

(LinkAsia News: October 14, 2011) Japan reggae artists MC Rankin and Dub Ainu Band deliver a cautionary message about radioactive material through this song ...

Via D'un Renard
Karen Harvey's insight:

I think it would be great to have  a GLOBAL RADfest in all nations on the same week-end----culminating in marches to the nation's capitols--DEMANDING in song, art, prayer, drama and petition: 1. Complete transparencey and educational program for minimizing radiation health effects and spread 2). UN/all-nations international help for Japan and the Pacific Ocean remediation/mitigation 3). the immediate end to nuclear--no more plant building & licensing, 4).  no more nuclear weapons production & use, globally 5). immediate  global shut downs of power plant with implementation of best/longest-lived dry cask storage on or near site 6).  underground storage only in very dry, already contaminated, isolated areas. 7). International technological  collaboration and monetary support for the development & use of the safest possible radioactive waste disposal technology  8).national &  international ban on mining the of  urnanium and other radioactives  9). Outlaw the use and development of of radioactive technologies other than how to "un-radioactivate" and permaently  isolate. WE CAN HAVE the TIME of OUR LIVES -- saving ourselves and humanity from this rude money-hungry-rougue  nuclear "industry"---which has morphed into the  Greatest all time GLOBAL TERRORIST  having committed the most horrendous crimes ever known to humanity:  irrepairable harm and/or destrction of the Earth/Ocean, LIFE  & life sustaining resources,  and our SACRED genetic future!

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Rescooped by Karen Harvey from IDLE NO MORE WISCONSIN
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Lac Courte Oreilles Harvest Camp opened in Penokees (9min) - Indian Country News

Lac Courte Oreilles Harvest Camp opened in Penokees (9min) - Indian Country News | WI Mining Law & Radioactive Waste Dumping Setup | Scoop.it

The Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe tribe has opened a treaty harvest and educational camp on public lands in the Penokee Hills, near the site of the proposed worlds largest open pit iron mine, upstream from the Bad River Reservation. The site includes an area that hosted  almost 200 Indian allotments in the late 1800 which were stolen, or deceptively removed from Indian ownership in favor of wealthy investors of the original shaft mining in the area. Ancient mining artifacts in the region have been carbon dated to 260AD. The camp will be open for hunting, fishing, harvesting and public recreational use as defined by treaty and public laws.


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, April 28, 2013 3:12 PM

The Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe tribe has opened a treaty harvest and educational camp on public lands in the Penokee Hills, near the site of the proposed worlds largest open pit iron mine, upstream from the Bad River Reservation. The site includes an area that hosted  almost 200 Indian allotments in the late 1800 which were stolen, or deceptively removed from Indian ownership in favor of wealthy investors of the original shaft mining in the area. Ancient mining artifacts in the region have been carbon dated to 260AD. The camp will be open for hunting, fishing, harvesting and public recreational use as defined by treaty and public laws.

Rescooped by Karen Harvey from FUKUSHIMA 311 WATCHDOGS
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RETIRING NUKE REACTORS: Western firms use experience, technology to join decommissioning process - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun

RETIRING NUKE REACTORS: Western firms use experience, technology to join decommissioning process - AJW by The Asahi Shimbun | WI Mining Law & Radioactive Waste Dumping Setup | Scoop.it

For a variety of reasons, many nuclear power plants are currently being retired across the Western world. Decommissioned reactors have started to appear in Japan, too.

At Japanese sites, such as Chubu Electric Power’s Hamaoka nuclear power plant and Japan Atomic Power’s Tokai nuclear power plant, most of the decommissioning work has been carried out by Japanese firms. Local companies cost less, so this is a way to save money while also boosting the regional economy. Experts say that dismantling and clearing a nuclear plant is not that dangerous, provided it is done carefully, based on a meticulous plan.

However, this is not the case with the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

Decommissioning a disaster-hit reactor is uncharted territory. The authorities still do not know exactly what is going on inside the reactor. What is clear, though, is the presence of strontium and other radioactive materials not usually found at retired nuclear sites. The work is further complicated by the damaged state of the buildings and facilities.

I heard that moves were underfoot to get foreign companies involved in the decommissioning process at Fukushima.

When it comes to repairing or dismantling complex atomic power facilities, firms from nuclear-armed nations like the United States, Britain and France have ample experience. Their expertise could be used to help retire an accident-stricken reactor like the one at Fukushima.

Kashiwa in Chiba Prefecture is home to the Engineering Research and Development Center of ATOX Co., a Japanese firm that deals with nuclear power plants.

ATOX was founded in 1953. It was originally involved in the building cleaning industry, but moved on to cleaning up and decontaminating atomic power facilities. It is now engaged in maintenance and disassembly operations at all of Japan’s nuclear plants.

The center’s demonstration building is a huge space as big as a shipyard. It has a 10-meter-wide circular hole in the floor revealing a watery surface about eight meters down. This is a full-scale model of the well of a boiling water reactor like the one at the Fukushima No. 1 plant. The actual well is located in a vertical shaft directly above the reactor.

“We are testing to see whether a piece of newly developed equipment will perform well at a nuclear plant,” said Takeshi Takahashi, the center’s deputy manager.

Last January, three experts from Areva SA, France’s largest nuclear power firm, came to stay at the center until March.

Areva has developed a lot of decommissioning knowledge through its work at French military facilities and at reprocessing plants for spent nuclear fuel. The three visitors offered advice on the correct procedures for handling radioactive materials, for example, and also helped out with robot building.

“Areva places great importance on developing scenarios for decommissioning," said ATOX Managing Director Seigo Fujikawa. "We learned a lot about how to devise systems to cut levels of radioactive materials or prevent exposure when working in highly radioactive environments.”

One ATOX staff member has also been working at Areva since June. In October, the two firms signed a letter of intent with the goal of establishing a joint venture in future.

“It's hard to make inroads into the Japanese decommissioning business without outside help," said an executive from Areva Japan. "Ideally, we should work together with a Japanese firm well-versed in the layout and attributes of Japan’s facilities.”

Toshiba, a firm involved in the original construction of the Fukushima No. 1 plant, has also solicited help from overseas to tackle the crisis.

Once week after the onset of the March 11, 2011, accident, staff from a specialist U.S. company came to Toshiba’s head office to give advice. Toshiba continues to work with several U.S. firms to tackle water contamination and other problems. For instance, ALPS, an apparatus that removes radioactive materials from contaminated water, was designed by Toshiba with technical support from Salt Lake City's EnergySolutions.

U.S. corporations have gained valuable experience through work at radioactive military facilities and the accident-hit Three Mile Island nuclear power plant.

“These firms have the technology to treat radioactive water and handle nuclear fuel," said Masahiko Kobayashi, chief engineer at Toshiba’s Nuclear Energy Systems & Services Division. "We need to borrow these technologies and adapt them to the situation at Fukushima.”

British companies are also looking to get involved.

“The key thing is which company has the most appropriate action plan. The nationality of the company shouldn’t matter so much,” said Richard Oppenheim, head of Climate Change and Energy at the British Embassy in Tokyo. “U.K. firms have a lot of experience when it comes to decommissioning, so they can provide the right technology and solutions.”

Decommissioning is usually seen as an extension of a nuclear plant’s day-to-day repair and renovation work, so Japanese enterprises have also built up a lot of technical expertise. When it comes to the Fukushima No. 1 plant, though, we can’t just say, “we’ll manage somehow with Japanese companies only.”

In August, the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning (IRID) was set up by a number of Japanese electric companies, research institutes and atomic reactor makers. The new agency sent out a global call for technical support to deal with contaminated water at the Fukushima plant. Around 30 percent of the 779 proposals it received came from overseas.

“Foreign firms tend to take a rational approach that examines the various options and chooses the ones that minimize the risks and costs,” said Hajimu Yamana, IRID president. “I want to bring this approach and technical expertise to Japan.”


Via D'un Renard
Karen Harvey's insight:

What are we waiting for?

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