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The Geography of Vocabulary: The Bubbler

The Geography of Vocabulary: The Bubbler | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"It's happened to just about all of us when we travel outside the state. You're absolutely parched and ask a friendly looking stranger...."Where's the bubbler?" They look at you like you're speaking Klingon."

 

This article comes Wisconsin, one of the few other places that refers to a water/drinking fountain as a "Bubbler."  Rhode Islanders know that makes us distinct, but what geographic patterns are present in this linguistic quirk?  This regionally-based term comes from  the Kohler Company (from Wisconsin) that trademarked the term to sell their product and the name stuck in a few places (and internationally it is used in Australia as well).      


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South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | Geography Education

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | Geography Education | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight: This infographic is a great introduction to the historical genesis of South Sudan and the political uncertainty and difficulties that it now faces as an independent country.

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Urban Agriculture

Urban Agriculture | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Aerial photo tour across countries and continents with a French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand” Seth Dixon, Ph.D.‘s insight: I love Yann Arthus-Bertrand’s photography; so many of them are geography lessons in and of themselves as he captures...

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North Korean Deadline For Embassies And The South's Workers Aligns With DPRK's 'Magic Number'

North Korean Deadline For Embassies And The South's Workers Aligns With DPRK's 'Magic Number' | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Earlier North Korea told embassies in Pyongyang to consider evacuating their employees because it can't guarantee their safety after April 10.  That's also the day that South Korean (ROK) companies must pull all of their workers out of the Kaesong industrial complex — an ROK-financed project that accounts for up to 40 percent of the North's revenue.

For the last few days the North has blocked South Koreans from entering the complex in the North — considered the last lifeline between the two Koreas — while allowing them to leave at any time.The date 4/10/13 also plays into the fact that three generations of the Kim family have been fixated on the number 9."


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/when-north-korea-is-going-to-attack-2013-4#ixzz2PgdFAhyq


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2013 8:48 AM

Is North Korea doubling down or is this merely a big bluff in the geopolitical game of high stakes poker?

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International Migration | Geography Education

International Migration | Geography Education | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

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Karaites: Who Are They, and Where Do They Live?

Karaites: Who Are They, and Where Do They Live? | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Like the Samaritans, the Karaites accept only the Five Books of Moses (the Torah) and the Book of Joshua, and their identity as Jews has been questioned on a number of occasions.

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Re...

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Re... | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows. (Great infographic on neo-colonialism: "Out of Africa?

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AP Human Geography: App4Success

AP Human Geography: App4Success | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

This app for is being recommended by an APHuG colleague of mine.  It was created by two of her former students, each of whom scored a 5 on the AP exam.  It sells for $1.99.


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Wild rice gene gives yield boost

Wild rice gene gives yield boost | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A gene from wild Indian rice plants can significantly raise the yield of common varieties in nutrient-poor soils by boosting root growth.

 

While many are leery of GMOs (with good reasons linked to health), it is important to recognize that there is society value to agricultural research that works on improving yields.  This article would be a good "other side of the coin" resource to share when discussing GMOs.   


Via Seth Dixon, Steve Perkins
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brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 9:06 PM
Phosphorus-deficiant soil cannot grow crops. Without ample amounts of agriculture, a countries economy cannot be stimulated enough to be successful, or worse, not feed it's people on a local level. This all depends on a countries physical geography.The land, however, can be change through the use of a gene that boots root growth. With this help, populations and the economy can be sustained.
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The Geography of Afghanistan

The Geography of Afghanistan | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Students are introduced to the physical and human features of Afghanistan."


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David Lizotte's curator insight, February 27, 2015 6:04 PM

Afghanistan is a unique country that is plagued by the media as war torn and savage. Not much about Afghanistan cultural geography and how ordinary Afghan people function is represented by mainstream news organizations and other forms of western media. Its a shame. 

Afghanistan is a mountainous country thus creating four distinct regions that have more or less there own identity. This has been seen throughout history. Geography can keep a nation separated culturally and tougher to govern on a political scale as well. This is especially present in lesser develop nations. For example Ancient Greece was tough to keep politically sound due to its nonstop Mountains. This makes communication difficult, especially in a timely fashion. It also keeps people separate from each other leading people to create there own culture. Italy is another example in regards to the Industrial North being an extreme opposite of the agricultural south. The Northern Italian geography was heavily influenced by other European industrial nations while the agrarian south remained simple. These two separate identities have been present for some time and have continued to produce conflict since the forming of the Country Italy in the late 19th century. None the less, Afghanistan is another example of geography separating a country. However the geography also gives birth to different styles of living.

People in rural Afghanistan still practice pastoralism. The movement of livestock by changing of seasons is complemented by farmers growing of crops such as barley, nuts, wheat, and fruit, just to name a few. These people mostly live off of what they produce. Within the past decade Afghanistan has undergone a process of urbanization. I argue its due to westernization of the potential/growth of a Central Business District. The respected main cities in the four different regions, especially Kabul have seen a huge population growth. This is due to cities offering education and economic mobility. The standard of living is higher and attracts people from rural areas. I can imagine it is attracting relatively young people ranging from 15 to 30 years of age whom are seeking a different way of life.

The cities rely on the rural regions for certain supplies of food and the rural regions rely of manufactured goods. Its nice to see Afghanistan pastoralists not  being luddites and excepting technology as a positive force.

My perception on Afghanistan is that its a first world country. However it is starting to form the foundation for lifting itself from first world to second world. Afghanistan has a new government (western influenced), which is essential in developing a nation. However there are signs of corruption. If able to establish a more sound country, it can begin to build its economy from within and spread outward. With becoming more politically and economically developed Afghanistan would become a second world nation. Afghanistan has a lot to go through before it can be considered second world. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, March 4, 2015 11:27 PM

Once I opened this portal I was amazed with how many resources were available, having worksheets, maps, lesson plans and videos really can help a teacher to get more in depth while teaching about Afghanistan. Having the opportunity to let the children watch video's can really help the visual learners in the classroom and well s the auditory learners. The lesson plan talks about the history and people in Afghanistan as well as maps that help trace out ethnicities in the region.The video on daily life would really help show the children how different their lives are from those in Afghanistan, to create an assignment from the video the children could do a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the lives of the average United States citizen and the daily life of someone living in Afghanistan.

Every area in the world has a different geography  and I believe it is important for everyone whether it be students or adults, everyone should learn about each region to get an understanding of how other people are living in the world around us.

As a history, social studies or geography teacher I would come back to this lesson plan and enlighten my children using the Common Core Standards so when they venture out in the world they have a grasp of what is going on around them.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:52 PM

From this, I learned that the borders are shaped for Russia and British India to have uncommon borders. Having friendly ties with Pakistan has a lot to do with the Soviet presence with in Central Asia. It is predominantly agrigul society. 20% live in urban areas and 80% live in rural areas. Urban spaces tend to be more modernized with water and electricity.  Those in the rural areas have had no running water and have been living their lives without and in a way in which we would not be used to. People in rural areas cook on open fire, life for women is very labor intensive, so it is good for big families because then the children can help, both in and out the house. 

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Enclaves | Geography Education

Enclaves | Geography Education | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

 

Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight: This website is an exhaustive list with information on the world's enclaves that are so often entangled in geopolitical issues.


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Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont

Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Lawmakers in Vermont are looking to regulate food labels so customers can know which products are made from genetically modified crops, but agricultural giants Monsanto say they will sue if the state follows through.

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Blake Welborn's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:30 AM

If monsanto can win a course a battle saying they don't have to represent their GMO's on products, then they will be able to win in other places which will further murk up the waters of GMO presentation.

Obed Hernandez's curator insight, February 18, 2015 5:34 PM

Figures!

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:58 PM

Questions to ponder: Why is Vermont the first state to make some headway in producing this type of legislation?  Will other states follow suit?  What would the economic impacts be if all places required labels on products that contain genetically modified organisms?  How would that change the agricultural industry?  

 

Tags: GMOs, food, agriculture, agribusiness.  

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How Code-Switching Explains The World : NPR

How Code-Switching Explains The World : NPR | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

The way we mix languages and speech patterns is an apt metaphor for the way race, ethnicity and culture intersect in our lives. Introducing our new blog, Code Switch.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:44 PM

unit 3-- language and culture

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What Is GIS? | Geographic Information Systems

A geographic information system (GIS) integrates hardware, software, and data for capturing, managing, analyzing, and displaying all forms of geographically referenced information.


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A Difficult Choice for Turks in Germany

A Difficult Choice for Turks in Germany | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Unlike their E.U. counterparts, children of Turkish immigrants have to choose their nationality by the age of 23 or they will lose their German passports.

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This is America, But We Don't All Speak the Same English

This is America, But We Don't All Speak the Same English | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Clearly, if you were raised in Jackson, Mississippi, you are going to sound very different from someone who was raised in Boston, Massachusetts

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Wild rice gene gives yield boost

Wild rice gene gives yield boost | WHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A gene from wild Indian rice plants can significantly raise the yield of common varieties in nutrient-poor soils by boosting root growth.

 

While many are leery of GMOs (with good reasons linked to health), it is important to recognize that there is society value to agricultural research that works on improving yields.  This article would be a good "other side of the coin" resource to share when discussing GMOs.   


Via Seth Dixon, Steve Perkins
more...
brielle blais's curator insight, May 1, 9:06 PM
Phosphorus-deficiant soil cannot grow crops. Without ample amounts of agriculture, a countries economy cannot be stimulated enough to be successful, or worse, not feed it's people on a local level. This all depends on a countries physical geography.The land, however, can be change through the use of a gene that boots root growth. With this help, populations and the economy can be sustained.