What's Happening to Africa's Rhino?
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What's Happening to Africa's Rhino?
So many stories! Here's a quick look at the good, bad, ugly and encouraging RHINO NEWS
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Baby rhinos get second chance in S. African orphanage

Baby rhinos get second chance in S. African orphanage | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
The baby black rhino slurps milk greedily from a cola bottle, hops around and chases its caregiver in South Africa's newest and largest orphanage for calves whose parents were poached for their horns.
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Irish police try to solve mystery as thieves go missing in Dublins secret tunnels

Irish police try to solve mystery as thieves go missing in Dublins secret tunnels | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Dublin police are still trying to solve the riddle of the two men who entered the city’s sewerage system last Friday – and haven’t been seen since.

 

Newspaper reports speculate that the pair were planning everything from a raid on a local bank, the theft of rhino horns worth $60million or a terrorist attack on the nearby Dublin Castle....

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Man charged over rhino theft bid

Man charged over rhino theft bid | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
A third man arrested over the attempted theft of a rhino horn from Norwich Castle Museum is charged by police.
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Rhino horn thieves on trial in Austria

Report on Austrian Independent english news online newspaper: Four men are currently in court in Krems, Lower Austria, accused of a series of rhino horn thefts throughout Austria.

 

The two horns stolen from Burg Rastenberg were worth 170,000 Euros.

 

If found guilty they face prison sentences of up to ten years.

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Wonderful People Wednesday - Peter Milton protects rhino

Wonderful People Wednesday - Peter Milton protects rhino | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Saving endangered and threatened wildlife is Peter's passion and his work. Rhino, cheetah, leopards, lion in South Africa.

 

I was born in the Kalahari, a desert wilderness area, in South Africa. My parents were both nature and animal lovers and introduced a value system in me at a very young age which embraced a deep respect and love for fauna and flora. My formative years were hugely influenced by nature and conservation issues and either by accident or design, my father had me spending much time with wildlife and conservation focused people such as Prof JB Smith, Dr. Neil Rickert, and many others.... 

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Lyn du Plessis's comment, August 2, 2012 4:18 AM
I wish we had more people like Peter Milton and SPOTS - thank you Peter for the wonderful work that you do x
Wildlife Margrit's comment, August 2, 2012 10:45 AM
Agreed morlyn.lyn thanks for the kind words.
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Rhino poaching syndicate on the prowl in Southern Cape, South Africa

Rhino poaching syndicate on the prowl in Southern Cape, South Africa | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Police in the Southern Cape believe that a rhino poaching syndicate might be at work in the region.

 

This follows the discovery of the remains of a bull this week on a farm near Mossel Bay. Despite ample security measures, the poachers killed the rhino 500 metres from the main house.

 

Police spokesperson Malcolm Pojie says preliminary reports indicate that the rhino was darted before it was de-horned.

 

"Well, it's quite clear based on the evidence that we found on the scene that a syndicate might be involved in this horrific death and we're investigating all those possibilities."

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Tracking Namibia's Rhinos - Because they're Awesome!

Tracking Namibia's Rhinos - Because they're Awesome! | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

I scan the ochre mountains and golden hills, dotted with acacias and low shrubs, hoping a rhino will materialize. A Steenbok, one of the smaller antelopes bounces around nearby....

 

My fascination with rhinos goes back to high school, where I read Ionesco's Rhinoceros, a play about the absurdity of human nature. A few years later, I stood in front of Albrecht Dürer's woodcut of a rhinoceros at the British Museum, hypnotized by the prehistoric-looking animal with its two large horns and armor-like hide...

 

 

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How to stop rhino horn trade: Convince people it's a bogus remedy - Asian Correspondent

How to stop rhino horn trade: Convince people it's a bogus remedy - Asian Correspondent | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

How to stop rhino horn trade: Convince people it's a bogus remedyAsian CorrespondentSouth African Rhino, pic: Jonathan Talbot, World Resources Institute.


Via Trevor TQ Harvey
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Rhino Poaching vs Rhino Sales

Rhino Poaching vs Rhino Sales | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

As a Conservationist their is no doubt in my mind that animals cannot compete for habitat in a capitalistic society with out monitory value. Emotional out cries against hunting and animal products has lead to many species loosing the race against alternative land usage and even though many people are shouting Eco-tourism it proved stupid to base the health of large Eco-systems on the success of World Economy. With action and adventure sport, cheap destinations and Discovery channel setting expectations the foreign tourism market have no way to support the animal population explosion in South African Game Reserves.

 

As long as some thing has a monitory value there will be money to protect it. Let us take Gold, Oil and Drugs for an example. The new G.O.D of the world.

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Property agent nabbed for illegally trading rhino horn

Property agent nabbed for illegally trading rhino horn | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
A well known property agent from Bethlehem, her husband and another woman were arrested for illegal trading in rhino horns.

 

The 61-year-old agent and the woman, 58, were arrested after they were caught in a police trap after months of investigation, the Volksblad newspaper reported.

 

The agent and her 57-year-old husband stayed on a farm in Fouriesburg, which was managed by the husband.

 

A police dog was used to find the four rhino horns in the farm house.

 

The couple and the woman were in custody and held by police in Bethlehem.

 

They were expected to appear in the Bethlehem Magistrate's Court on Thursday.

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Affluent Vietnamese driving rhino horn poaching in South Africa, report warns

Affluent Vietnamese driving rhino horn poaching in South Africa, report warns | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Conservationists say conspicuous consumption from a growing middle class is opening a new market in the illegal wildlife trade.

 

Conspicuous consumption from a growing middle class in Vietnam is driving the catastrophic poaching of rhino horns in South Africa, conservationists warned on Monday.

 

While the country's appetite for rhino horn was in recent years largely driven by the mistaken belief it was a cure for cancer, lately it has become a party drink for corporate events and promoted on Vietnamese websites as "the alcoholic drink of millionaires" when ground down and taken with wine....

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South Africa, wildlife conservation, and international pressure

South Africa, wildlife conservation, and international pressure | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
South Africa has long had an official policy to place wildlife in private hands. This means kudus, wildebeest, impalas, rhinos, lions etc are traded and bred to supply game ranches, private parks, hunting organisations.

 

Many hunting proponents claim that South Africa “saved” white rhinos by allowing them to be sold to private owners to then be shot by foreign hunters.

 

And South Africa “saved” many other species by allowing them to be ranched and sold for commercial profit. Indeed, some will claim that by allowing private breeders to supply canned lion hunting trophies, we are actually saving the wild lions.

 

But we do need to take an informed step backward from such views. Let’s perhaps give South Africa some credit for the initial idea of allowing wildlife, normally the property of the State, to be placed in private hands. Perhaps there was even some hopeful thought that this would result in a positive benefit for conservation.

 

But this has never happened. Private ownership by necessity involves commercial utilisation, most of which will be consumptive (hunting for meat and trophies, live trade), so by and large there is no conservation component – just having more “wildlife” on game ranches does nothing for wild populations. Indeed, by allowing rhinos to be commercially utilised, South Africa provided an initial supply that seeded massive levels of commercial poaching in the country and beyond.

 

By creating a supply for the Asian Traditional Medicine bone trade of lions, South Africa has created growing levels of lion poaching across Africa, especially involving neighbouring countries like Botswana....

 

http://www.lionaid.org/blog/2012/07/south-africa-wildlife-conservation-and-international-pressure.htm ;

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Rhino Crisis Round Up: Game Farmers Allegedly Killing Their Own Rhinos & More

Rhino Crisis Round Up: Game Farmers Allegedly Killing Their Own Rhinos & More | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
This week, the South African media reported that some game farmers and reserve owners have allegedly been killing their own rhinos and claiming the rhinos were...

 

...game farmer Dawie Groenewald was mentioned in the IOL/ Cape Times revelation, since the bodies of 20 dehorned rhinos were found in a mass grave on his property shortly after his 2010 arrest....

 

...Marnus Steyl, who (allegedly) hired Thai prostitutes to pose as trophy hunters to kill rhinos on his property. Steyl is (allegedly) linked to the lion bone trade as well.
However, a Hawks’ spokesperson told Eyewitness News that they do not want “farmers to be painted with the same brush [as poachers]“....

 

...R11 million (US $1,331,077) in assets belonging to South African game farmer and convicted rhino horn dealer Jacques Els have been seized. The assets are “believed to have been acquired through criminal activities” and the seizure includes his Thabazimbi property.


Els began serving his eight-year sentence earlier this month.
As of July 17th, at least 281 rhinos have been massacred for their horns this year in South Africa....

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Antique rhino horns now viewed as banned collectibles, says Antiques Roadshow

Antique rhino horns now viewed as banned collectibles, says Antiques Roadshow | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Rhinoceros horns from these endangered animals are still popping-up during Antique Roadshow TV programs; while the Chauvet Cave in France features paintings of rhinos from approximately 40,000 years ago.

 

Antiques Roadshow is currently educating America about the controversy surrounding rhinoceros horn antiques and collectibles that are still being made from this endangered animal that can be traced back to the Aurignacian period...

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Lyn du Plessis's comment, August 7, 2012 6:00 AM
I read that some of these 'antiques' dealers are asking for a letter signed stating that the horn is 100 years old or so. If they can do this, then the only way is to stop all trade in Rhino horn with immediate effect. You will always find some low-life looking for a way around the law!
Wildlife Margrit's comment, August 7, 2012 4:04 PM
Sadly you're right morlyn.lyn, as long as there's money to be made somebody will create and find loopholes.
Thanks for adding this comment.
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Rhino thieves jailed

Rhino thieves jailed | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Four men have been jailed after they were convicted of stealing rhino horns from an exhibition in Burg Rastenberg, Lower Austria, last year.

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Kruger National Park races to end the rhino slaughter

Kruger National Park races to end the rhino slaughter | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Kruger National Park races to end the rhino slaughter...

DNA data, tracker dogs, choppers - the Kruger National Park has pulled out all the stops to save its rhino, writes Sipho Kings.

Sniffing the wind, its tiny ears swivelling round to get more information, one of the Kruger National Park's rhinos is distinctly uneasy. The wind is against it, favouring the predator – or in this case, the horde of journalists and photographers snapping away and scribbling notes. And with awful eyesight it can do little more than face the apparent danger, intimidating with its horns. This is the problem of the rhino: the lumbering mass of muscle is hopeless when faced with a threat that is not standing right in front of it.
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Rhino horn bail application postponed

Rhino horn bail application postponed | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Two men accused of dealing in rhino horn have not yet applied for bail, the Johannesburg Magistrate's Court heard.

 

KwaZulu-Natal Ezemvelo Wildlife employee Bheki Msweli and his co-accused Malusi Dubazane appeared briefly for allegedly contravening the Biodioversity Act.

 

Their case was postponed to September 7 for further investigation.

If they applied for bail before that date, they would be requisitioned to appear in court....

 

Msweli was not found in possession of rhino horn but, because of his suspicious behaviour, police believed he was linked to the crime.

 

Msweli was transferred to the anti-poaching unit last year as part of a strategy to monitor his movements and activities.

 

In 2010, Dubazane was arrested on another rhino poaching charge with three other men. He was later acquitted due to a lack of evidence.

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US man pleads guilty in rhino horn smuggling

US man pleads guilty in rhino horn smuggling | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

NEW YORK — A New York antiques dealer pleaded guilty Tuesday to charges related to a crackdown on a major rhinoceros horn smuggling ring, prosecutors said.


David Hausman obstructed justice and created false records when he pretended to help wildlife experts investigate rhino horn trafficking, while in fact taking part in illegal deals.


The 67-year-old faces a maximum of 25 years in prison, although a guilty plea usually leads to some degree of leniency.


At the time of his arrest along with six other people around the country in February this year, Hausman was found to possess four rhinoceros heads and six black rhinoceros horns and $28,000 in cash.


Manhattan US Attorney Preet Bharara said: "David Hausman pretended he was helping law enforcement protect a species from being wiped out but instead he was contributing to the very problem."


"Trafficking in endangered species like the Black Rhinoceros is an egregious violation of the laws enacted by Congress to protect endangered species from extinction," a top environmental offical at the Department of Justice, Ignacia Moreno, said in a statement.


"Operation Crash" also saw the arrest of a Chinese citizen, Jin Zhao Feng, who was nabbed in Los Angeles and accused of shipping dozens or more rhino horns to China. The horns are used in traditional Asian medicine, regardless of fears that poaching is driving the huge African animal to extinction.

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Rhino poacher jailed 15 years

Rhino poacher jailed 15 years | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

CHIREDZI — A 57-year-old rhino poacher was last week jailed for 15 years following his conviction on two counts of invading Humani Ranch and Senuko Safari Ranch in Chiredzi and killing the endangered animals.


Elasto Dhobho last Thursday left the court in stitches when he accused one of the complainants of fabricating the poaching allegations to ensure he got incarcerated while the ranch owner took over his wife.

 

However, the court dismissed the claims as baseless.

 

Charges against Dhobho were that on June 8 last year, he trespassed into Senuko Safari Ranch and gunned down a black rhino but failed to remove its horn after the animal regained consciousness and staggered off before it collapsed three kilometres away from the scene.

 

It was discovered by game scouts after three days with its horn intact.

 

The rhino was valued at $120 000.

 

The following month, but on a date not known to the State, Dhobho went to Humani Ranch where he shot and killed another black rhino. He chopped off its horn and went away. The animal’s decomposing carcass was only discovered two days later and nothing of value was recovered. The rhino was valued at $75 000.

 

Spent cartridges recovered from the two incidents were sent for ballistic tests and found to be matching Dhobho’s rifle.

 

Magistrate Langton Ndokera ordered Dhobho to pay $195 000 restitution to the ranchers while the rifle was forfeited to the State.

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Dog helps rat out rhino horn thieves

Dog helps rat out rhino horn thieves | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
Four white rhino horns with a total value estimated at R2.5m were recovered by police in a farmhouse in the Fouriesburg district on Monday.
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HSI Takes Rhino Poaching by the Horns in China

HSI Takes Rhino Poaching by the Horns in China | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
In June 2012, HSI took part in a series of presentations at a press conference in Beijing, where we called on the Chinese public and authorities to help arrest the escalating rhino poaching crisis.
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Young scientists abuzz over rhino poaching

Young scientists abuzz over rhino poaching | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Johannesburg - An idea by two school girls to use honey bees to combat rhino poaching...

 

Their project won them a scholarship each for a year’s study at Rhodes University.

 

A handful of bees were trained to detect the smell of kudu horn. A kudu was substituted for rhino as they could not obtain a rhino horn.

The bees learnt to associate the rhino smell with sugar water...

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Latest Rhino Poaching Stats.

Latest Rhino Poaching Stats. | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it

Via OSCAP

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KZN Officials lureRhino poacher into trap

KZN Officials lureRhino poacher into trap | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
KwaZulu-Natal - Wildlife officials had their suspicions about one of their rangers being involved in poaching rhino in KwaZulu-Natal. So they set a trap, transferring the Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife ranger to the anti-poaching unit where he could be more closely watched.

 

Eight months later, the trick paid off and, together with members of the Durban Organised Crime Unit, they swooped on the ranger on Friday....

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Don' jump to conclusions: Hawks investigating game ranch #rhino poaching cases

Don' jump to conclusions: Hawks investigating game ranch #rhino poaching cases | What's Happening to Africa's Rhino? | Scoop.it
The Hawks are investigating various cases involving rhino poachers.JOHANNESBURG – The Hawks on Thursday called on the public not to draw conclusions from...
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