Rights and Responsibilities of Australian Citizens (Stage 3)
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primary_school_teaching_resource.pdf

Lisa Seeney's insight:

This is an excellent teacher resource which gives relevant and quality teaching and learning activities based on Australian citizenship. Teachers can use this resource to plan a whole series of lessons which link to the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizenship and which really help students to consolidate their understanding of what it means to be an Australian citizen. There are numerous activity sheets attached to the document which directly correlate with the content presented which give an excellent framework from which teachers can create a unit of work. 

The content is appropriate for stage 3 and it suitable for cross curriculum links in many subjects. In particular, a literacy link could be formed by getting students to complete the activity sheet on page 22 of the resource (a plus, minus, interesting chart on the privileges of Australian citizenship) which under the new Australian Curriculum can consolidate the year 6 literacy sub strand 'Interacting with others' by participating in a discussion about their chart within a small group in order to clarify and share their opinions.

This would allow a form of peer assessment to occur through feedback of ideas and directed questioning in small groups. This kind of social learning aligns with Vygotsky (1978) who suggested the notion that social interaction facilitates greater learning that that which would occur by individual work.

 

References:

- English. (n.d.). The Australian Curriculum v6.0 Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum. Retrieved April 6, 2014, from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/Curriculum/F-10

 

- Vygotsky, L. (1978). Interaction between learning and development. Mind and Society, 1, 79-91. Retrieved April 7, 2014, from http://www.psy.cmu.edu/~siegler/vygotsky78.pdf

 

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From high seas to HSC: a refugee success story - YouTube

Bashir Yousufi is an orphan who fled Afghanistan leaving behind three younger brothers. He's now a high school student in Sydney's west with a passion for th...
Lisa Seeney's insight:

This resource gives students a global perspective surrounding Australian citizenship and what it means to be an Australian citizen. The video outlines the journey of Bashir, who at 14 fled Afghanistan to pursue a better life in Australia. It tells of his perilous journey across the seas and his journey from Christmas Island to Australia where he has made a life for himself where he can focus on getting an education. This content is suitable for stage 3 and allows students to understand that people from all over the world come to Australia to become citizens. 

Using Debono's 6 thinking hats (http://www.debonoforschools.com/asp/six_hats.asp), have students watch this film and respond using 3 hats of their choice. This will encourage deep and critical thinking and provides a literacy link to the resource. Students should submit their responses to the teacher to receive feedback on their comments, which not only acts as a formative assessment but as an opportunity to get students thinking about their thinking.

According to Gilbert & Hoepper (2011), SOSE should "give students opportunities, knowledge and skills to express their own judgements". By using the 6 thinking hats alongside this rich and engaging global resource, students are empowered to formulate their own opinions and become more informed citizens of Australia and the world.

 

Resources:

- Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.


- Six Thinking Hats: A Tool to Strengthen Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, and Creativity Skills. (n.d.). Six Thinking Hats. Retrieved April 7, 2014, from http://www.debonoforschools.com/asp/six_hats.asp


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Australia's 1967 Referendum

Australia's 1967 Referendum | Rights and Responsibilities of Australian Citizens (Stage 3) | Scoop.it
Why have the results of the 1967 Referendum had a lasting symbolic significance? Civil rights activist Faith Bandler...
Lisa Seeney's insight:

This video shows an interview with Faith Bandler, who is a civil rights activist of Southern Sea Islander heritage. Faith is a native of Tumbulgum, NSW and was a major leader in the 1967 referendum of Aboriginal Australians. The interview details Faith's hard work and commitment to the 'YES' cause and the steps she had to take to contribute to making the referendum a success. Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders should be advised that the clip may contains images and voices of people who have passed away. This clip gives an important insight to viewers about some of the injustices that were faced by Indigenous Australians in the past and also details the process by which Faith and other civil rights activists lobbied to get the referendum changed and why this was important. This allows students to understand the struggle faced by Indigenous Australians to become equal citizens in their own country by being counted in the Census.

This video gives an honest Indigenous perspective to students surrounding citizenship and highlights the long struggle that Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islanders went through to gain equal representation under the law and the constitution in Australia. The content is rich for a stage 3 level but may require some teacher scaffolding via a word bank with unfamiliar words or terms to be discussed after viewing.

This video can be paired with information about Tony Abbot's proposal to change the constitution to acknowledge Indigenous people as Australia's first people.

To foster a numeracy link with the resource, students could be asked to construct a timeline of major events that shaped the history of Australia's citizenship focusing on milestones of Indigenous rights such as the referendum and the more current proposed changes to the constitution. Students can find out this information via the internet as a research project and present their physical timeline to the rest of the class to be displayed as a form of assessment.

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Australian Citizenship – Why should I become a citizen?

Australian Citizenship – Why should I become a citizen? | Rights and Responsibilities of Australian Citizens (Stage 3) | Scoop.it
Australian Citizenship
Lisa Seeney's insight:

This government website gives useful information to students about what citizenship is and the specific rights and responsibilities of Australian citizens. There are explicit and specific facts found here that will act as a foundation for student knowledge surrounding the concept of citizenship. There are links to personal stories of Australian citizenship which would be engaging for upper primary. This website would be a great resource to look at as a whole class at the start of a topic on Australian citizenship as all of the fundamental questions are answered, such as 'what is an Australian citizen?' and 'what are the responsibilities and privileges of being an Australian citizen?'. This directly correlates with the featured dot point for stage 3 which requires students to understand both the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizens.

To consolidate the idea of citizenship as well as creating opportunities for cross curricula learning through creative literacy, teachers could ask students to create their own country where they have to make up their own rights and responsibilities for their 'citizens' using a provided scaffold. If students struggle with the concept of this, first make a whole class version which can be hung on the wall as a reminder where all students have contributed. Once students have created their country, they should be given time to write an oral presentation where they can describe their set of citizen rights and responsibilities and be asked questions by fellow students. This is a form of assessment for learning and teachers can choose to give written formal feedback via a task performa or verbal informal feedback after the presentation.

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Youth Vote

Youth Vote | Rights and Responsibilities of Australian Citizens (Stage 3) | Scoop.it
As we all know by now, Australia is coming up to a Federal Election soon. While politics might not thrill you, you have to admit that we're pretty lucky to live in a country where we get to choose who's in charge. But some are worried that young people will miss out on their chance to have a say because they're not enrolled to vote. Here's Sarah.
Lisa Seeney's insight:

This video resource from popular childrens' online news website 'BTN' is an engaging resource detailing one of the responsibilities (and rights) of being an Australian citizen. Using the other resources on this Scoopit site, stage 3 students undertaking this learning area should be familiar with what citizenship means and be able to identify the rights and responsibilities associated with being a citizen. This video will dive more deeply into the particular section of voting and why this is an important part of citizenship.

The video raises awareness of the importance of voting and encourages students to become interested in the idea of democracy. By highlighting issues in todays society surrounding a lack of youth involvement in voting, the video encourages students to take their right and duty as an Australian citizen seriously and to understand that their vote is important.

There is a good opportunity for a cross curriculum link with Mathematics under the new Australian Curriculum strand 'statistics and probability' for year 5 where students are required to create different types of data displays. Students could be asked to conduct their own vote within the classroom using their peers and then plot their results in a column or bar graph. This would get students used to the concept of voting and the importance of each vote in deciding an outcome. The teacher could informally assess these graphs after they have been put on display to gauge student understanding. As cited in the article by Williams (2010), creating a generation of students that are enthusiastic about voting is a hard process which "falls to state, territory and national 

curriculum designers and chalkface teachers to
build the cognitive and effective scaffolding to
launch a cohort of school-leavers who understand
and value their ballot."

 

Resources:

- Mathematics. (2014, February 18). The Australian Curriculum v6.0 Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum. Retrieved April 8, 2014, from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/mathematics/Curriculum/F-10

 

- Williams, P. (2010). The youth don't vote. Professional Educator, 9(3), 18-21. Retrieved April 7, 2014, from http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy2.library.usyd.edu.au/fullText;dn=184767;res=AEIPT

 

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