What is story?
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Free online video editor. Make a video using Shotclip.

Free online video editor. Make a video using Shotclip. | What is story? | Scoop.it
Easy and free online video editor. Edit videos and photos to make great home movies.

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Jenn Scheffer's curator insight, August 3, 2013 6:42 PM

Excited to try this out in the fall! 

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Ten practical tips to ease final paper woes - Marist College The Circle

Ten practical tips to ease final paper woesMarist College The CircleAddress the opposition –Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, the authors of "They Say I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing," argue that it is important to engage...

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Rescooped by Melissa Salgado from Dystopian Literature for Young Adults
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Results on ReadWriteThink - Dystopian

Lesson plans & activities dealing with Dystopian concepts in literature & film


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Science Fiction & Fantasy Books: Great Dystopian Novels - The 12 Best Dystopian Novels

Great Dystopian Novels - The 12 Best Dystopian Novels: Literature has been a defining part of culture since the ...

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» Rise of the Machines: Why We Keep Coming Back to H.G. Wells’ Visions of a Dystopian Future

» Rise of the Machines: Why We Keep Coming Back to H.G. Wells’ Visions of a Dystopian Future | What is story? | Scoop.it
War of the Worlds, The Time Machine and The Island of Doctor Moreau set the template for today's bleak science fiction, from Alien to The Terminator.

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I rarely finish books | Greg Baxter

A lot of people read a book every week. A lot of writers I have met read every new novel published, seemingly. I think that’s a bad idea. But what other writers do is none of my business. But if anybody – I mean an aspiring writer, I guess – ever did ask me for advice, my advice would be to stop reading so many books, to give up reading contemporaries, to give up the English-language bias and read some books in translation, or in the original, if possible. Most importantly, do not review books. Engage in responsible criticism, but do not write book reviews. Reject the language of critical theory. Try to exercise, just a little bit, because when you get near forty you will wish you had kept in better shape. Squander your twenties, or learn a trade. Never make a change to anything you write based on the idea that it makes what you write more appealing.

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Rescooped by Melissa Salgado from How to find and tell your story
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Story Trumps Description (Nonprofit Storytelling #9) | Getting Attention

Story Trumps Description (Nonprofit Storytelling #9) | Getting Attention | What is story? | Scoop.it

"Show rather than tell to motivate supporters to care, then act.

 

If you take away just one thing from this post, make it this—You want your listener to take action because they want to—not because they’ve been told to. When you craft your stories to ensure listeners to connect your info with what they already know (test it), you’re far more likely to build trust and rapport with them. In turn, this group relationship is most likely to be transformative, motivating their desire to take action, now and in the future, and to spread your stories/messages to friends and family." Read the full article to see a before and after example.


Via Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
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Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, June 5, 2013 2:19 AM

Be sure to scroll down the page to find the links to 8 other articles in this series (which work for anyone, not just non-profits), including a series on how to tell these 6 types of stories:

- founding

- focus

- success

- people

- future

- strength

Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:23 PM

Beautiful!

Rescooped by Melissa Salgado from Just Story It
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Share a Story, Help Create a New Perspective

Share a Story, Help Create a New Perspective | What is story? | Scoop.it

Before I share his story—or more specifically, have him share his story—let’s talk briefly about why you want to use stories to help shift someone out of a stuck place.


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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 17, 2013 12:47 AM

Colleage David Lee shared this post with me and I think it's great because it reminds us again about how the stories we share in business can help create shifts and changes in people.


Lee shares a situation he had with a client, and how he used a story to help that person shift to a different place and resolve a long-standing issue.


While the post is about a coaching interaction and the power of story, I bet a good number of the busines stories you share have the same ability. Lee makes good points in the article that how stories can create both personal and organizational change.


Lee's post is perfect timing. I've just been re-reading the book "Influencer: The Power to Change Anything" by Kerry Patterson, et al (2008). It's all about storytelling and great stuff.


If you want to read more about how stories can influence people to shift, then read Lee's post. For a deeper dive, dig into "Influencer" (I have no relationship with the authors or their publisher, I just think it's a fab book!).


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Looking at the Future of Marketing -- & Storytelling

Looking at the Future of Marketing -- & Storytelling | What is story? | Scoop.it
Insights from Gerd Leonhard on the marketing trends you should be paying attention to now.

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Mike Ellsworth's curator insight, May 28, 2013 6:46 PM
Karen Dietz's insight:

 

Here are Leonhard's predictions that connect with storytelling:

1. Marketing will be more personalized and customized.  Breaking trust with customers will be deadly. Stories help create personalized marketing and build trust. They also help you keep that trust.

 

2. Ongoing conversations will consume marketing activities, which is different that what is happening today. That means lots of story sharing back and forth between customers and between the company and customers.

 

3. Data alone will never be enough. Companies need to reach consumers on an emotional level. That's the role of stories.

 

Mike Ellsworth's insight:

 

If you don't already know that you need to be telling stories online, mosey on over to Karen's curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


Here are Leonhard's points in brief:


1. By 2020, most interruptive marketing will be gone. 

2. The idea of having a separate marketing department is going to vanish. In the future, the "reason to buy" will be socially motivated

3. Location-based services will be immensely valuable and useful, but not until we have some kind of a privacy bank 

4. Companies are going to try to predict how people feel about their brand, and then adjust in real time

5. Companies can collect all the data they want, but data alone will never be enough. You still need to reach consumers on an emotional level. 


Cho Rong Kim's comment, May 30, 2013 12:32 PM
I always get good advices from your scoops. I really appreciate about your effort ^^ Thank you.
Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, June 4, 2013 7:24 PM
Thank you so much Cho Rong! Enjoy the day :)
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The Reason Your Biz Story Matters Video

http://www.socialmediabynumbers.com The era of Social Media has changed the nature of organizational definition. We are no longer authors of our identity, bu...

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Oakville Deals's curator insight, June 2, 2013 12:49 PM

What's your story? What are your mission vision values? Why it matters.

Excellent video.

Cho Rong Kim's comment, June 3, 2013 3:43 AM
Really nice!
Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, June 4, 2013 7:28 PM
Thank you all for your comments! Glad you liked the post :)
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Cool Tech, Good Characters & the Evolution of Storytelling--James Cameron

Cool Tech, Good Characters & the Evolution of Storytelling--James Cameron | What is story? | Scoop.it
He might be Hollywood’s highest-grossing director, but when it comes to his choice in movies James Cameron is an everyman.“My tastes have always been pretty blue collar. I never went to film-study classes.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 4, 2013 5:57 PM

Veteran film maker, innovator, and movie storyteller par excellence weighs into the discussion about the evolution of storytelling. To hear some people talk you'd think this 100,000 year old art form is undergoing eath shattering change.


Well, is that so? According to Cameron -- NOT! Glad to know we think alike :)


Here is the very valid point Cameron does make: it is not the structure of a story that's changing, it's the media through which stories get told. And the technology to help us tell and share stories is also changing. Both of these are very good things. 


As he says in the article: “I think the future of storytelling is: You think of some good characters and you have them do some cool stuff that you can relate to and go through hell and come out the other side of it changed in some positive or negative way, and then it ends,” he says, with a chuckle. He acknowledges that methods of conveying stories may evolve, such as multiple plot lines or interactivity, but, for him, the movie will remain at the core."


Cameron makes a few other nice points about connecting to the audience. This is a very nice and enjoyble read. Many thanks to the author Anne Cassidy for writing such a great post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Rescooped by Melissa Salgado from Daring Ed Tech
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Flipping the Assessment with a Doc Camera

Flipping the Assessment with a Doc Camera | What is story? | Scoop.it
When I was in school I often got papers back from my teachers, especially my English teachers, with lots of red marks all over them, a few comments, and a grade at the top.  Did I closely chec...

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GwynethJones's curator insight, June 6, 2013 9:04 AM

"I got a recording of the teacher talking to me about my paper?  What if I got individualized feedback from my teacher where he or she is talking to me. " -- COOL! A LOT of work, but cool!

online4ed's curator insight, June 7, 2013 7:38 AM

I use this strategy and students tend to really appreciate it. Yes, a lot more work because I still make all the comments on the text, but worth it if it helps students apply suggestions, right?  

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Storytelling w/ Data: What Are the Audience Impacts?

Storytelling w/ Data: What Are the Audience Impacts? | What is story? | Scoop.it

Storytelling with data visualization is still very much in its “Wild West” phase, with journalism outlets blazing new paths in exploring the burgeoning craft of integrating the testimony of data together with compelling narrative.


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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 7, 2013 5:13 PM

This article is a little heady but fascinating. I love eavesdropping in on other fields to see the effects storytelling is having, and to understand how we are grappling with similar issues. And to understand what their contributions might be!


This is a perfect example. Data visualization or data storytelling or data narratives is a hot topic today. The internet is littered with smart, funny, interesting, or very dense infographics that we pass around like hot cakes.


For many years data-visualization has focused on how to take data and visually display it so it is easily understandable. Lately they want the data to tell a story, but haven't yet explored adding story structure and story elements into their end products very much. And they interchange the words narrative and storytelling a lot thinking they mean the same thing (not all narratives are stories: think Wikipedia entry).


Nevertheless, their efforts are admirable and I enjoy keeping tabs on this field. And what I like about this article is that it is beginning to ask two critical questions -- what effects do our data visualizations have on our audiences; and how do we measure that?


So the author, Nick Diakopoulos, identifies elements that story conveys that we are very familiar with: learning, memorability, insights, engagement, sharing, conversation, credibility, persuasiveness, emotional responses, etc. The author forgot 'taking action' :)


Fascinating! I love this because as people in the field of data visualization entertain these questions, how they organize and display their material is going to change and become more 'storied'.


Why else is this article important? Well, because I bet folks creating infographics can learn a lot from us biz storytellers. And likewise, I think that these brilliant data folks will come up with nifty techology solutions about audience reactions that business storytellers will be able to benefit from. And that's just my first guess.


Dealing with data runs along a spectrum -- from business people and storytellers wanting to know how to weave data into their stories to data geeks wanting to know how to display their numbers in ways that tell a story.


Through conversations and sharing between our fields, we can learn a lot from each other and be better for it. Here's to collaboration and cross-pollination!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Kati Sipp's curator insight, June 8, 2013 8:11 PM

Do you use data to tell stories in your work, as a journalist or organizer? You might want to check this out.

Marie-Sophie's curator insight, June 14, 2013 4:20 AM

#Therearedifferentwaystotellthisstory

Rescooped by Melissa Salgado from Dystopian Literature for Young Adults
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The Maze Runner book review

The Maze Runner book review | What is story? | Scoop.it
Imagine waking up in a place in which you have no idea where you are, any recollection of how you got there, the events of your past or who you are.  The o (The Maze Runner book review http://t.co/gq6yg4M9...

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Courtney M Laurie's curator insight, December 4, 2013 12:52 PM

Students are checking out this series

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Dark Materials: Reflecting on Dystopian Themes in Young Adult Literature

Lesson Plan | Six ways to approach "dark," post-apocalyptic young adult fiction.

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The Art of Repetition | The New York Times

The Art of Repetition | The New York Times | What is story? | Scoop.it

To become a writer, you have to follow a few rules: Show, don’t tell. Avoid clichés. Be specific. Try not to repeat yourself.

 

These rules work for me whether I’m writing an essay like this or an ad at the agency where I work as a writer and creative director. I’ve learned that people don’t love to be told things. But they don’t mind being shown things. When you demonstrate an idea for a reader or viewer, you let him participate in the process.

 

I try to teach this to the copywriters who work for me. Find the story. Make it matter. No one wants to be lectured to. And that’s true if you’re creating a mobile app, a TV spot or even a PowerPoint.

 

And the toughest lesson: learn to love doing the same assignment again and again. Writing, like building furniture or making jewelry, is “Groundhog Day.” How many ways can you write a headline that says, “Here’s a dollar off coupon”? The answer turns out to be almost infinite.

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Rescooped by Melissa Salgado from Geography Education
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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | What is story? | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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Rolex & Their Storytelling "Icons" Campaign - Fab Story Triggers Example

Rolex & Their Storytelling "Icons" Campaign - Fab Story Triggers Example | What is story? | Scoop.it

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 25, 2013 2:22 PM

Colleague Omar Kattan wrote this post about Rolex and their new 'Icons' campaign that has been a huge hit.


It's a brilliant use of story triggers on Rolex's part. What is a story trigger? In this case, Rolex is using images of movers and shakers who have worn their watches. These images spark stories within the minds of the viewers. No stories are explicitely told, they are simply trigger the associations and stories we already have embedded within us.


Kattan brings two Rolex videos into his article as examples. The first one about Elvis Presley is more of a back story -- and I'm left wanting more of the story!


The second video is much more of a story trigger. It's not really a story, but a video that sparks memories and stories within me about Andy Warhol.


I agree with Kattan in the article when he says Rolex needs to develop the story further, by adding more back stories. People will love them. And as Kattan also says, imagine what could happen for Rolex if they solicited stories from their customers about themselves or members of their family wearing Rolex watches!


Like Kattan, I congratulate Rolex on doing such a good job here and showing all of us what's possible using story triggers.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Os Ishmael's curator insight, May 26, 2013 11:07 AM

Nice find. A great example of the power of storytelling and how it can posture up a brand.

Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, June 6, 2013 4:37 PM
Thanks Os! Yes, it is a terrific example. Glad you like it too.
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When Leaders Should NOT Tell Stories: Jo Tyler at TEDxPSU

Jo Tyler, Associate Professor of Training and Development at Penn State, is an educator, storyteller, organizational consultant, and mosaic artist. When she ...

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 29, 2013 5:16 PM

Here is colleague Jo Tyler giving her TED talk and I love it! Very little is available that addresses when NOT to tell biz stories -- especially leaders. Tyler gives some terrific guidelines on this topic.


But that's not all that's here in this video! There are other gems about:

  1. Listening for the story
  2. Offering your biz stories as food for thought instead of them being all about you
  3. Story is not a tool (great explanation!)
  4. Story success is depending on your authentic relationship to the story
  5. She gives a fabulous example of an executive who really screwed up storytelling and the consequences it had on the organization


All of these points are critically important for content creators and business story folks to understand and incorporate.


Enjoy the video!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 30, 2013 9:50 AM

I scooped this from Karen Dietz. She is a great story telling educator.

Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, June 6, 2013 4:36 PM
Thank you so much for your kind comment Alison! And Margaret, glad you also found value in the article.
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7 Things Biz Storytellers Can Learn From Fiction Writers

7 Things Biz Storytellers Can Learn From Fiction Writers | What is story? | Scoop.it
Content marketing is storytelling, so it's not all that bizarre to think that fiction writers might actually have some advice for us.

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 3, 2013 12:42 PM

Here is what I like about this post, written by marketer Pratik Dholakiya -- his points about suspense, showing not telling, rethinking characters, write what you love, and continuing to hone your craft.


At first glance you might go, "Yeah, yeah". I did too until I started reading and enjoyed some of the twists he took on these conventional topics.


Like suspense. I love that he says all stories -- and yes business stories -- are all about mysteries and unresolved problems. Don't be too quick in providing answers! Build the mystery and suspense in your stories. In other words, don't turn your stories into an FAQ! Lead people on a suspenseful journey. Check out what he says about avoiding common blog posts structures.


Show, don't tell. Well, that's obvious. But sometimes harder to do. The rule of thumb? Don't give examples or descriptions -- share stories with images.


Who is your character? Think of your organization as a character. It doesn't have to be limited to a single person. Think of a thing, organization, or event as a character. And a character always wants something, encountering obstacles to fulfilling those wants. Therein lies your story.


Write what you love. Stop writing about topics you think you should be writing about. Audiences can always tell when you are not emotionally engaged in the story. If at some level you don't love what you are writing about, it bleeds through. Audiences can tell and don't engage either. So fair warning!


OK -- there are other great points Dholakiya makes here, so go read the article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Andrea Norwood's comment, June 24, 2013 3:56 PM
I totally agree and my character wants something and that's control over humans and the earth and of course their underground world too. I say, as I learned from a great author and mentor Stephen King. Make sure every story has a beginning, middle and end, because that helps to make a story without them, then there is no story. Only rambling.
Fran Bambust's curator insight, July 23, 2013 4:34 PM

Verhalen vertellen en toch met zakelijke dingen bezig zijn... Nee, het spreekt elkaar niet tegen. Integendeel...

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5 Powerful Elements for Incredible Business Stories

5 Powerful Elements for Incredible Business Stories | What is story? | Scoop.it
Stories can create change, both in ourselves and in our organizations. In this guest post, Matt Ragland shares five elements of powerful stories.

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Constance Jones Collier's comment, June 6, 2013 12:39 PM
Thanks for sharing everyone loves a good story :)
Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, June 6, 2013 4:35 PM
I appreciate all of your comments!
Birgitta Edberg's comment, June 8, 2013 6:28 PM
Thanks!
Rescooped by Melissa Salgado from How to find and tell your story
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Story Trumps Description (Nonprofit Storytelling #9) | Getting Attention

Story Trumps Description (Nonprofit Storytelling #9) | Getting Attention | What is story? | Scoop.it

"Show rather than tell to motivate supporters to care, then act.

 

If you take away just one thing from this post, make it this—You want your listener to take action because they want to—not because they’ve been told to. When you craft your stories to ensure listeners to connect your info with what they already know (test it), you’re far more likely to build trust and rapport with them. In turn, this group relationship is most likely to be transformative, motivating their desire to take action, now and in the future, and to spread your stories/messages to friends and family." Read the full article to see a before and after example.


Via Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
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Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, June 5, 2013 2:19 AM

Be sure to scroll down the page to find the links to 8 other articles in this series (which work for anyone, not just non-profits), including a series on how to tell these 6 types of stories:

- founding

- focus

- success

- people

- future

- strength

Azania Nduli-AmaZulu UbuntuPsychology.ORG's curator insight, July 8, 2013 6:23 PM

Beautiful!