What is and what is not plagiarism
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What is and what is not plagiarism
How do I know when to give credit? What is common knowledge?
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Basic Rules for Citing Different Media

Basic Rules for Citing Different Media | What is and what is not plagiarism | Scoop.it

The best method of plagiarism protection is by ensuring to cite all of your sources properly and consistency. For the common citation formats there will be differences in the way you need to format between different media such as books and internet sources. This guide explains the basic differences between citing different media so you can cite different sources properly and avoid the risks of plagiarism.

Book Citations

Book citations need to include the title of the book, the publishers and place of publication, date of publications and the names of the authors, so make sure you get this information before you hand the books back. The basic format example for a book reference is (Smith, John. Book Title. Place of Publication: Publishers, Publication Year.). Things get more complicated with anthologies, republished books, books with multiple authors or by an organization. You can instead use the last name and use initials for the first name.

Journal Citations

For citing a journal, you need to include the name of the author(s), the title of the journal entry, the name of the journal, the journal series number, and the journal volume number (if they are given), the journal issue number, the year the journal was published, and the pages of the journal that are used. Under MLA the journal title should be underlined. For example (Smith, John. “article title.” Journal Name Journal Series/Number/Volume, Year, Pages). For journal articles that you have found online, you need to include the URL in pointed brackets afterwards.

Internet Citations

For internet citations or other electronic citations, you need to include the Author(s), the page title, the date when the page was posted, the date you accessed it, and the html address in pointed bracket. For example (Peter Parker. The evolution of spiders. 2005. 10 Jun 2012 http://www.spiderfacts.com/spider_evolution.asp1>.).

Each new entry needs to be indented. For quoting or citing references in the text, each citation is used in the same way no matter what the media of the citation is.

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Mark Twain on Plagiarism and Originality: “All Ideas Are Second-Hand”

Mark Twain on Plagiarism and Originality: “All Ideas Are Second-Hand” | What is and what is not plagiarism | Scoop.it

"The kernel, the soul -- let us go further and say the substance, the bulk, the actual and valuable material of all human utterances -- is plagiarism. For substantially all ideas are second-hand, consciously and unconsciously drawn from a million outside sources, and daily use by the garnerer with a pride and satisfaction born of the superstition that he originated them; whereas there is not a rag of originality about them anywhere except the little discoloration they get from his mental and moral calibre and his temperament, and which is revealed in characteristics of phrasing.".

 

"Those who do not want to imitate anything, produce nothing."


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Editorial Photographers UK | Visual plagiarism: when does inspiration become imitation ? (page 1 of 2)

Editorial Photographers UK | Visual plagiarism: when does inspiration become imitation ? (page 1 of 2) | What is and what is not plagiarism | Scoop.it
There may be no new ideas, but some ideas are less new than others. So where is the line drawn between genuine accidental similarity, homage, and wholesale copying?
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