What can be done to combat internet trolls and hatespeech?
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Hate speech nothing new; didn't know there was so much of it.

Just a smattering of articles to provoke thoughts about the question.

FickleFayCreep's insight:

In this six article survey of stories about combatting hate speech online, there are no conclusions. Only an overview of sorts, together these articles shed light on some recent efforts to limit the seemingly endless supply of hate speech on the world wide web as well as identifying some of the sources of this hatespeech comes. As you all well know, these are ethically complicated questions.

The recent outpouring of the WAM! protest proves that, when logging on to facebook, many people are tired of unwittingly stumbling upon insipid vitriol. This pressure to monitor hatespeech from consumers and advertisers alike, may prove to influence a trend towards at less depressing internet.

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Companies Pull Facebook Ads Over Violent Content | TIME.com

Companies Pull Facebook Ads Over Violent Content | TIME.com | What can be done to combat internet trolls and hatespeech? | Scoop.it
Facebook lost more than a dozen advertisers, some just temporarily, after a campaign drew attention to pages on the social network that promoted violence against women.
FickleFayCreep's insight:

Companies like Nissan spend enough advertising dollars to sway a behemoth like facebook. Not to mention the organizers of the massive protest that contributed to facebooks decision. Though Nissan can seem like a bit of a paper tiger when they and facebook make up a few days later, It would appear pulling out ad revenue is an effective way to combat the seemingly endless amount of violent mysogyny the internet and its users force into the world.

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Facebook’s Plan to Stop the Hate: Holding Us Accountable | TIME.com

Facebook’s Plan to Stop the Hate: Holding Us Accountable | TIME.com | What can be done to combat internet trolls and hatespeech? | Scoop.it
Yesterday, I asked Facebook to take down a fraudulent page. Within a few hours it was gone, just a shadowy image of a bandaged thumb where it used to be. Very effective.
FickleFayCreep's insight:

Policing the internet is a daunting task. This piece helps to illustrate the problem of monitoring a site like facebook with millions of users worldwide. It's not only maddening to consider reviewing each post analytically; determining how far is too far, but combing through all of the hatespeech as well. One replaces the other like the borg on Star Trek.

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Vermont Enacts The Nation's First Anti-Patent Trolling Law

Vermont Enacts The Nation's First Anti-Patent Trolling Law | What can be done to combat internet trolls and hatespeech? | Scoop.it
An unexpected new battleground in the war against patent trolls: Vermont has enacted a law targeting "bad faith patent assertions."
FickleFayCreep's insight:

While patent trolls are different from the sort of trolls who populate the comment section of youtube with racial slurs directed at children, patent trolls are still a cause for great concern in the cyberworld. The patent troll debate, like the just plain troll debate, carries with it many similar philisophical and legal arguments and dilemmas. Is Vermont's anti-patent trolling law constitutional?

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Report says Twitter is a breeding ground for terrorism and hate speech | Digital Trends

Report says Twitter is a breeding ground for terrorism and hate speech | Digital Trends | What can be done to combat internet trolls and hatespeech? | Scoop.it
While all social networks face the challenge of scrubbing their sites clean of offensive or damaging material, Twitter has it the worst.
FickleFayCreep's insight:

This piece neatly illustrates the steps social media outlets like twitter take when deciding when content becomes "too inflammatory." I think it also indirectly supports the notion that humans will find a way to use social media for any manner of nasty business. When is free speech too free?

 

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Adorable Cheerios Commercial Gets Racist Backlash Online

Adorable Cheerios Commercial Gets Racist Backlash Online | What can be done to combat internet trolls and hatespeech? | Scoop.it
An adorable Cheerios commercial featuring an interracial couple and their daughter generated such a strong racist backlash on YouTube that the comments section had to be closed.
FickleFayCreep's insight:

I do not think of youtube's closing of the video's comment sections as an attack on free speech. I don't think lonely turds dicking around on the internet are whom the authors of the constitution had in mind when they put quill into ink. I'm having a hard time remaining objective about this one. I mean, what kind of sad, sad sack has the time, let alone the lack of conscience, to attack a damned cheerios commercial for the varying skin tones of the actors chosen to help sell cereal? I think youtube did the right thing. By silencing these trolls, they made a small dent in the cesspool of humanity. By the way, who wants to use youtube to watch recent TV commercials? Oh that's right. Trolls.

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Online disinhibition and the psychology of trolling (Wired UK)

Online disinhibition and the psychology of trolling (Wired UK) | What can be done to combat internet trolls and hatespeech? | Scoop.it
Are people genuinely more aggressive, rude and unpleasant online, and if so, why? And what can we do to counter that, and make the internet a more tolerant place?
FickleFayCreep's insight:

I firmly believe disinhibition online brings out the worst in human beings. With the advent of the "comments section" came the dawn of the internet troll. Anonymity and the lack of immediate interpersonal consequences are what give these predominantly male, entirely pathetic trolls (and let's face it they probably resemble trolls physically) the confidence to write hateful comments commanding their fellow humans to "go kill yourself for that epic fail you faggit!" This wonderfully written piece is one of the few I found which addressed the psychology of online hate speech and trolling. I don't think most people leading remotely fulfilling lives are populating the internet with hatespeech. This article also serves as an introduction to human psychology. When we, as humans have unpleasant things happen to us, we tend to project those feelings of hurt onto others.

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