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What Rio doesn’t want the world to see

"Rio is hiding poor people. See Part II: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU "


Via Seth Dixon
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M Sullivan's curator insight, June 14, 2017 10:46 PM
Urban planning violating Human Rights
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, January 23, 9:33 AM

Rio was suppose to be saved by both the World Cup and the Summer Olympics. With an economy that had absolutely plummeted and corruption reigning supreme these two events were suppose to put the country on the world's stage to show off and the money that the Olympic committee would give them would help rebuild many of the poorest areas in Rio. However, as shown in the move instead of improving the areas for the people they have simple either destroyed those neighborhoods or uses walls to cover up many of the poor areas.  I visited Rio in early 2016 and notice myself on the way from the airport to the place where I was staying high walls built up and wondered why these were there? Soon to find out from a few locals that behind those walls were some of the poorest places in the country. Since they were so close to the airport and people would be flying there for the games they did not want people to see these areas. Why not fix them then, you were given billions of dollars to do just that? Well when you match a corrupt Olympic committee with an equally corrupt Brazilian government you end up in a major cover up and money going into the hands of government officials.  A great video to watch that will make you angry and sad about the situation. 

Douglas Vance's curator insight, February 2, 3:40 PM
Whenever international attention is drawn to a city or specific place for an extened period of time, every city will make strides to make their city look as good as possible to international visitors. In the case of Rio, that involved altering bus routes and relocating poor populations to areas that would be away from the gaze of the international community. Using urban planning to reshape entire neighborhoods and essentially the makeup of the city itself is rarely undertaken and does not occur withour massive side effects as shown in the video with violence and protests against such actions.
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This map should change the way you think about foreign aid

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
As you can see, the biggest recipient by a long way is Israel (this is fiscal year 2014 data, but nothing's changing), and two other big ones are Egypt and Jordan, which both have aid packages that are tied up with their peace treaties with Israel. None of these are poor countries (indeed, Israel is downright rich), and the point of the money is to advance an American foreign policy agenda — not to help the poor. Pakistan and Afghanistan, which round out the top five, actually are pretty poor, but, again, the main American interest in them is clearly foreign policy rather than poverty.

 

Tags: political, geopolitics, development, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
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lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 2016 1:01 PM
I wonder what this would look like if it were a map of the US's federal aid to the 50 states.
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Containerisatie vormde Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

 


Via Seth Dixon, Edelin Espino
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Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:45 AM

I believe this video is very interesting. It tells us that everything we have today is thanks to globalization and the reason we have it so fast is because of shipping containers! In the video it told me that before my time it was impossible to get swordfish from Japan or cheeses from France, but now thanks to globalization it is all possible. Globalization is even behind the reason how our phones were made! 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:28 AM

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today.  This is a very useful video.  

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Launch of world's biggest 'ship'

Launch of world's biggest 'ship' | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Groter dan het Empire State Building. Geen optie dus om door het Panamakanaal te gaan. Daarom gaat Venezuela een groter kanaal bouwen om schepen van deze omvang niet om te laten varen via de punt van Zuid- Amerika. Prachtig voorbeeld van de enorme schaalvergroting die plaatsvindt.


Via Seth Dixon
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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:34 PM

I've got a weak spot for massive ships, plain and simple. I think there's even a future in ship-based cities which move around the world's oceans. Eventually ships can become so large and so advanced that the normal threats associated with the open ocean will do little to scratch them. For a comparison, the ship pictured is the Prelude FLNG, and it's almost twice the length of the Titanic.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 8:51 PM
unit 6
BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:19 AM

This is a floating testament that economies of scale will continue to push the limits.  Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America.  This is one reason why Nicaragua is planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Globalisering: visualisatie van de scheepvaartroutes wereldwijd

Globalisering: visualisatie van de scheepvaartroutes wereldwijd | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


Via Seth Dixon
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Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 2016 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 1, 2016 7:24 PM
A rainbow of shipping routes and info
James Piccolino's curator insight, January 18, 7:35 PM
This is incredibly interesting. I am a History guy, I love the subject and I love finding things I did not know about it. This fun interactive map did not so much contribute to direct knowledge of shipping/trade history as much as it has sparked my interest in it. There are old trade routes, who traveled down them and with what, and the ways those trade routes changed civilization and even sometimes started new ones. I never expected to say the words "Wow trade routes are fun!" but here I am. By the way, if you turn on absolutely everything at once, it creates this beautiful image. It is almost oddly relaxing. Sort of in the way some paintings can be.
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25 jaar na val van de muur is Duitsland nog steeds een tweedeling

25 jaar na val van de muur is Duitsland nog steeds een tweedeling | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

Via Seth Dixon
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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 6, 2014 11:43 AM

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:20 PM

The Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, but its influence is still present in today's Germany. History plays a key role in the shaping of political boundaries and that history is clearly evident in Germany. The line where the Berlin wall once stood still divides the country economically. The western part of Germany is far more economically affluent than the east. The USSR may be gone, but its influence still remains. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:14 AM

These two maps (unemployment on the left and disposable income on the right) are but two examples in this article that highlights the lingering distinctions between the two parts of Germany that were reunited 25 years ago.  The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin  Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 


Tags: Germany, industry, labor, economic, historical, political, borders.

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Kanaal door Nicaragua....doen?

Kanaal door Nicaragua....doen? | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Dwars door Nicaragua....van Atlantische naar de Pacifische Oceaan een kanaal aanleggen. Gekkenwerk? Slecht idee! Hier vind je redenen waarom je dat niet zou moeten doen. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 7:30 PM

Here in this article, it is discussed why the plan to dig a canal across Nicaragua could be a very bad idea. One main concern is the fact the Wing Jang's company has no prior infrastructure construction background, where the money is coming from, the whole $40 billion. Jang denies the government will have a role in paying. There is also the environmental standpoint. A proposed route would cut through Central America's largest fresh water lake, Lake Nicaragua. The lake is a major source of drinking water and irrigation, and home to rare freshwater sharks and other fish of commercial and scientific value.There is also the possibility of Pacific sea life entering the freshwater of the lake. Economic benefits from this new canal are not even guaranteed. That is just to name a few.  Overall, it seems to me that the earth's environmental affects would outweigh the monetary economics because the potential damage that could be done is devastating to both wild life and people of the country and region.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:18 AM

Today, the largest of the massive cargo ships are simply too big to get through the Panama Canal and have to travel down around the tip of South America; China is strategically working on strengthening their geopolitical position in the South China Sea and all international waters.  This is one reason why a Chinese firms are planning to construct a canal to rival Panama's.  This article highlights the reasons for concern (Maps 101 readers can read more about the geographic implications of Nicaragua's plans in this article co-authored by myself and Julie Dixon or you can sign up for a free trial subscription to see what else Maps 101 has to offer). 


Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, February 9, 10:58 AM
(Mexico/Central America) Nicaragua, the second poorest country in the western hemisphere, is subsidizing land to a Chinese entrepreneur to build a canal hopefully boosting the economy and unemployment. However, concerns for the environmental impact, rivalry with the Panama Canal, and Chinese control in the Americas are globally relevant. The agreement allows the Chinese company to privately own the canal for 100 years while Nicaragua receives some income. Nicaragua claims the canal will double the economy and triple employment rates, although the public is skeptical. The canal is being constructed through wetlands and Lake Nicaragua, a principle source of drinking water, raising environmental concerns for the rare tropical species and indigenous peoples of the area. The lack of transparency in the canal route and environmental damages raise concerns for biologists, while economists argue that the expanded Panama Canal is a superior choice for shippers.
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Wat er van Mexico te leren is

Wat er van Mexico te leren is | aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.


Via Seth Dixon
wereldvak's insight:

Er zijn meer Mexicanen die de VS verlaten dan er binnen komen. Het gaat goed met Mexico. De economische groei is groter dan die van de VS en Brazilië!

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Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 8:37 PM

The title of this article was what enticed me as I was hoping to find an actual answer. However, based on this article alone, I don’t actually think there is much the United States can learn from Mexico about politics or economics.

 

This author failed to mention that a difference in political systems could also attribute to the new Mexican leader’s ability to obtain “endorsements from across the spectrum.”  Mexico recently had an election. The new President this article is praising is part of a party that controlled the land for 70+ years until Nieto's predecessor. His predecessor messed up with the cartels so badly that Nieto was elected back into office. Given the amount of support Nieto had going into office, it doesn't seem so challenging to negotiate with opposing parties. Plus, I doubt the opposing parts are as unreasonable as some of the United States members of congress, like the Tea Party.   

 

I also see little to glean from the manufacturing route that Mexico is on at the moment. I will admit that the projected GDP growth of 4% mentioned in the article is impressive. However, thinking that the key to economic growth in the United States is through a similar “manufacturing boom” is just out of touch with the times. As stated in class our wages can’t keep up with the cheaper wages of developing countries (a point the author eluded to in the section discussing “the three main factors at play,” factor number three). Thus, doing what Mexico is doing doesn’t fit the American economy. What the United States might try doing is finding a manufacturing niche that no one has a market on in order to obtain more jobs. Maybe something higher end or medically related would be of benefit to the United States. Even these jobs would end up comprising a small part of the United States economy because the United States is more of a white collar economy. As such, more should be done to protect that sector of our economy from things like outsourcing given its relevance to our modern economy.

 

 Overall, I think the media’s quick comparisons of other countries falls under the bad category of globalization. A fair amount of people would just use this article to say things like, if Mexico’s leader can do X Y & Z then so should Obama. Yet, many of those people wouldn’t actually think about all the differences or reasons why Obama can’t compromise or revert the economy backwards. Am I saying Obama shouldn’t try more or that I am happy with the lack of compromise by all, no. However, I think it is dangerous for journalist to gloss over the situation since many people will take them as a credible source to cite. Mind you not all journalism is bad though. The Scoop.It article I read this week regarding Walmart is a great example of how investigative journalism can have positive consequences. The major difference being one actually did their homework that cited concrete specifics, while the other made a flimsy analogy.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 7:44 AM

While our government is perpetually mired in gridlock, the Mexican government is making lasting reforms to their nation. News attention on Mexico is almost always negative. While the violence and the drug trade are serious issues,  not enough attention is being devoted to the rapid growth of the Mexican economy. Politicians in Mexico are coming together to create an environment for positive economic growth. The article describes three factors that are leading to the growth of the Mexican economy. The first factor is Mexico's geographic location. Being located right next door to the United States is an enormous advantage for Mexico. Industrial goods are easily and cheaply being transported across the border. The second factor is the ever controversial NAFTA. The agreement ratified during the Clinton Administration allows for Mexican goods to be sold at lower rates than their Asian counterparts. The final factor is wages. The cheap labor environment has made the nation a manufacturing hub. So what can the United States learn from Mexico? Many of their economic advantages are not applicable to our country. However, we can look to Mexico for an example of functioning government. It well past time that our political parties come together and actually try to govern our nation.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:47 PM

Wow, what an interesting article about the direction Mexico is taking off on. Their GDP is increasing and the worker's wages are surprising better than Chinese workers. Both are huge exports of good and as a younger country than China, Mexico is on it's way to manufacture and economic boom. As neighbor country to Mexico, I am curious to see the actions U.S will take to learn and mirror Mexico's growth.