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Is Big Pharma "Mobile-Friendly"? | LinkedIn

Is Big Pharma "Mobile-Friendly"? | LinkedIn | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Together with its "Mobile Friendly" label, Google released a tool helping website owners to see if their site is up to mobile standards. This was a great chance to check out if Big Pharma's global corporate sites were mobile friendly?

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E-Health promotion. #web2salute. Health 2.0
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Asl ospedali social media: le "TOP 5" su Twitter e Facebook

Asl ospedali social media: le "TOP 5" su Twitter e Facebook | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Asl Ospedali Social Media: presentiamo la classifica delle “TOP 5” Aziende Sanitarie e Ospedaliere italiane su Twitter e Facebook. Dal 2013 analizziamo la presenza delle Aziende Sanitarie e degli ospedali nei social media.

Risale infatti al luglio di quell’anno una prima analisi del tema “Asl e ospedali ai tempi di twitter” condotta dal corso di marketing sociale Università di Bologna in collaborazione con FIASO – Federazione Italiana Aziende Sanitarie e Ospedaliere.

Come previsto dalle analisi, twitter ha perso il suo fascino a favore di facebook mentre, a differenza di quanto auspicato, non c’è ancora un utilizzo integrato delle varie piattaforme social (twitter, facebook e youtube).

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Digital News Report 2018 - Reuters Institute

Digital News Report 2018 - Reuters Institute | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

ITALY

This year has been marked by a bitter national election campaign, discussions about ‘fake news’, and continuing disruption in the media landscape. Few expected the March 2018 Italian elections to lead to a decisive political outcome and the campaign was marked by fears about the rise of populism and potential political conflict. Immigration became a major topic for discussion moving up the agenda in February with the shooting of six people of African origin in the city of Macerata by a far-right extremist. Other episodes of political violence contributed to the harsh climate in which the campaign took place. Pre-existing anti-establishment and antiimmigration sentiments have also been fuelled by the spread of misinformation. False information was used, for example, to misrepresent immigrants’ involvement in major and minor crimes and to accuse Italian politicians of nepotism. A journalistic investigation by BuzzFeed on a network of Italian websites and social media pages that spread nationalistic rhetoric, anti-migrant content, and misinformation resulted in Facebook shutting down several of these pages.76 In 2017, the President of the Italian Parliament organised official initiatives to fight misinformation, while the Government launched an online service to allow citizens to report ‘fake news’ to the Italian postal police. The latter initiative has triggered discussions on who should decide what information is true or false.77 While revenues in the broadcasting sector started to rise again after some years of decline, in September 2017 newspaper sales showed a 11% reduction year-onyear.78 After a series of further consolidation moves, two publishing groups share the leadership of the newspaper market: GEDI, which publishes La Repubblica and La Stampa, in addition to several local newspapers and radio stations; and RCS Mediagroup, which publishes Il Corriere della Sera, La Gazzetta dello Sport, and other local newspapers in Italy, in addition to El Mundo and Marca in Spain. After years of competition in the pay-TV market, in March 2018 Berlusconi’s Mediaset and Murdoch’s Sky Italia reached an agreement that includes the joint distribution of entertainment content on their pay-perview platforms and free-to-air TV channels. The online news market is still dominated by legacy players, but this year some digital-born outlets have started to make more impact. The top news brands in terms of online reach are those of the main newspapers (La Repubblica, Il Corriere della Sera, and Il Fatto Quotidiano) and the main TV broadcasters (the Mediaset’s TgCom24. it, SkyTg24, and the public broadcaster’s RaiNews.it). The website of the main Italian news agency, ANSA, has grown and reached the third position in the Italian ranking. This is an unusual example of news agency developing a direct consumer offer and attracting substantial online reach. RAI’s online news service has also improved its position, but is still far from matching the high levels of reach it achieves on television. Internal disagreements on the plan to reform the public broadcaster’s news services have led to the resignations of RAI’s top managers and are still slowing down the expected launch of a new news website. Impressive results have also been accomplished by newspapers focusing on local news, such as Il Messaggero (7%) and Quotidiano.net (7%). The most relevant change in the Italian online ranking is the growth of the digital-born outlet Fanpage (11%). In addition to its effective use of social media for distributing both hard and soft news content, Fanpage gained attention in February for its investigative reporting on the waste-dumping business, which led Italian authorities to investigate several local politicians and businessmen.79 This year, the trend towards pay models for online news from Italian newspapers has advanced further. In early 2016, Il Corriere della Sera was the first, among the main Italian general-interest newspapers, to launch a metered paywall. In late 2017, La Repubblica adopted a freemium model. Now many relevant Italian newspapers, including Il Fatto Quotidiano, La Stampa, and Il Messaggero, are adopting some form of pay models for their online news. Despite the moves by publishers, our data show the proportion of people paying for online news remains static at 12%.

Alessio Cornia Research Fellow, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

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“It’s time to listen to the real expert” Paziente esperto, da passeggero a co-pilota della ricerca terapeutica?

“It’s time to listen to the real expert” Paziente esperto, da passeggero a co-pilota della ricerca terapeutica? | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Conclusioni

Il rapporto stretto e sinergico tra pazienti,

partner pubblici e privati è condizione oggi

fondamentale per garantire la ricerca necessaria

per scoprire la nuova generazione di farmaci

in grado di fornire risposta ai pazienti,

interessati dalle migliaia di malattie ancora

senza terapia adeguata.

Il paziente esperto rappresenta oggi un ruolo

nuovo per la ricerca, l’evoluzione del quale

rappresenta una occasione da cogliere per

promuovere una nuova fase di sviluppo della

ricerca collaborativa nel nostro Paese. Sottoponiamo

questa proposta alla discussione pubblica,

con il fi ne di acquisire contributi che

permettano di elaborare un modello operativo

da condividere con tutte le parti interessate e

da applicare in tutte le occasioni di ricerca.

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L’intelligence artificielle excelle dans le diagnostic du mélanome 

L’intelligence artificielle excelle dans le diagnostic du mélanome  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Un ordinateur spécialement programmé a été plus performant que 58 dermatologues, face à des images de grains de beauté.

Un ordinateur remplacera-t-il un jour un médecin pour dépister les maladies?L’hypothèse n’est pas absurde. Au moins deux études montrent que l’intelligence artificielle fait mieux que l’homme pour le dépistage du mélanome, en regardant des images de grains de beauté. La dernière étude en date parue fin mai dans la revue Annals of Oncology a comparé la fiabilité du diagnostic de ce cancer lorsqu’il est émis par une machine et par 58 dermatologues. Après avoir «observé» cent images de nævus bénins et de mélanomes, l’ordinateur a identifié 95 % des mélanomes, quand les médecins en reconnaissaient… 87 %. Un chiffre qui est monté à 89 % quand ils disposaient d’éléments complémentaires sur le patient (antécédents, région cutanée concernée, etc.).

 

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#smokethis ft. Wretch 32, Suli Breaks, Emma Blackery, Matt Jones & Nicola Adams

Stick it to the tobacco industry and join: Wretch 32; YouTubers, Suli and Emma; Redbull sponsored biker, Matt; and Olympic gold medal winner, Nicola. Post your #smokethis pic, join the movement, and show the tobacco industry who’s in charge! These stars have come together with Cancer Research UK in a stand against the tobacco industry. Each year, the tobacco industry needs to recruit 100,000 new smokers to replace the 100,000 smokers that die every year. And get this, the tobacco industry makes more money than Coca-Cola, McDonalds and Microsoft… combined!
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Le fonds Patient Autonome : pour qui, pour quoi ? #esante #hcsmeufr

Le fonds Patient Autonome : pour qui, pour quoi ? #esante #hcsmeufr | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Le Fonds Patient Autonome, récemment lancé par Bpifrance, qui accompagne financièrement les startups de la santé connectée, vient de réaliser son 1er investissement dans l'entreprise Invivox. L’occasion d’en savoir plus avec Chahra Louafi, la directrice de ce fonds.

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The Power of Social Media in Medicine and Medical Education: Opportunities, Risks, and Rewards

The Power of Social Media in Medicine and Medical Education: Opportunities, Risks, and Rewards | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

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How Fitbit is trying to transform healthcare, and itself

How Fitbit is trying to transform healthcare, and itself | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Your physical and even mental health is a growing focus for Fitbit as it tries to fill the revenue gap left by a stalled business in fitness trackers.

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Medical Marketing: how to properly disclose social media endorsement according to the Federal Trade Commission Guideline

Medical Marketing: how to properly disclose social media endorsement according to the Federal Trade Commission Guideline | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

When thinking about transparency, those of us at a certain age will probably reminisce about the clear sheets of paper used for projector demonstrations your teacher drew on during high school biology class. Others may correlate transparency to the demanding call-to-action in the aftermath of the Enron scandal or Trump’s refusal to release his tax returns during his Presidential bid in 2016. Transparency is a word tossed around (usually in a post-corporate scandal cleanup) in most major industries—banking, real estate, and government. The healthcare industry is not dissimilar. Politicians call for transparency for drug pricing, consumers call for government accountability on healthcare coverage, and the FTC seeks transparency from healthcare marketers promoting their products to the public.

Many advertisers rely on the influence of celebrities, medical professionals and satisfied patients to positively impact the perception and sales of their brand’s product. With the increased focus on impacting patient behavior, especially through personalized product endorsements, healthcare marketers must adhere to transparent, ethical methods of providing education to consumers. As medical marketers navigate social media, they must balance a new world of effective influencer marketing with increasingly well-regulated government guidelines.

FTC ENDORSEMENT GUIDELINES

The basic premise of the FTC’s “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” is that, if there exists a material connection between the influencer who is endorsing the product and the company that is marketing the product (e.g., a payment, a free product sample or procedure, a family connection, etc.), that connection must be disclosed.

The FTC provides guidelines for the use of promotional endorsements and testimonials and has in recent years clarified their stance to encompass social media promotion. The FTC offers a number of guidelines that brands can follow to convey a reasonable degree of transparency to digital media/social media consumers.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN USER-GENERATED CONTENT AND PAID SPONSORSHIPS

The FTC recognizes the difference between paid endorsements and unsolicited content created by a product user. For example, RealSelf, a thriving community of individuals who share their experiences with particular products, procedures and physicians within the aesthetic beauty industry, is a perfect example of unsolicited consumer-generated content. When engaging in a paid or endorsement-related relationship with a brand ambassador or influencer, the FTC outlines the following key guidance:

    • Endorsements must reflect the honest opinions, findings, beliefs, or experience of the endorser. Furthermore, an endorsement may not convey any express or implied representation that would be deceptive if made directly by the advertiser.
    • The endorsement message need not be phrased in the exact words of the endorser, unless the advertisement affirmatively so represents. However, the endorsement may not be presented out of context or reworded so as to distort in any way the endorser's opinion or experience with the product.
    • When the advertisement represents that the endorser uses the endorsed product, the endorser must have been a bona fide user of it at the time the endorsement was given.
    • Any material connection between the advertiser and endorser must be disclosed.
    • Advertisers must balance any consumer endorsement with "competent and reliable scientific evidence" as well as "conspicuously disclose the generally expected performance" of the endorsed product.

Based on FTC research, even a consumer testimonial with the disclaimers of “results not typical” or “testimonials are based on the experiences of a few people and are not likely to have similar results” do not sway an audience from taking the claims as usual or typical. A strong disclaimer could be effective, and the impression left with the audience non-deceptive, however… do you really want to tempt the FTC these days?

THE FTC: KEEPING UP WITH THE TIMES

In keeping with the digital times and the constantly morphing use of social media as a viable healthcare marketing tool, the FTC released an April 2017 letter to over 90 influencers and marketers reminding them to:

    • Conspicuously disclose their relationships to brands when promoting or endorsing products through social media.

If the connection is not adequately disclosed, consumers might give the endorsement more credence than they would have given it otherwise, and the endorsement is considered by the FTC to be a deceptive business practice in violation of Section 5(a) of the Federal Trade Commission Act.

    • Disclose their material connection in "unambiguous language" and make the disclosure "stand out".

Because of the recent crackdowns on Instagram sponsorships, many influencers on the platform are becoming even more conservative with disclosing brand partnerships—even those that are unpaid. Sponsored promotions can no longer rely on unclear or cryptic language or hashtags to legitimize a product endorsement. For example #sp, #partner or "Thanks [brand]" are not sufficient to express the post is sponsored. On Instagram in particular, many brand ambassadors are adding the word "sponsored" and/or their brand partners name front and center where a location tag would normally go.

    • Ensure that the disclosure of an endorsement is readily visible and not hidden below a "More" button, particularly on Instagram.

Consumers viewing Instagram posts on mobile devices typically see only the first three lines of a longer post unless they click "more," which many may not do. The FTC goes on to clarify that hashtags delineating sponsored posts cannot be hidden in the midst of 20 other hashtags but must be easy to identify. Similarly, sponsored Instagram Stories must include a superimposed disclosure that is easy to notice and readable within the timeframe (or length) of the story, and cannot be hidden within other hashtags or text.

WORTH IT RATING: 100%

Patient testimonials and endorsements on social media can be incredibly helpful to you and your brand. This is especially true if the patient is writing about how much they like something they bought on their own and they are not being rewarded. Consumers have many opinions and personal experiences with a product or brand. Depending on the circumstance a marketer should not shy away from social engagement with a “thank you” response or an acknowledgment of the patient experience. We recommend not engaging with Internet trolls or bots. However, if the patient is writing that review as part of a sponsored campaign or are being compensated in any way—for example, getting a discount on a future purchase or being entered into a sweepstakes for a significant prize—then a disclosure is not only appropriate, it is imperative. 

We recommend fostering online relationships with those who are the most vocal of your users or patients. With proper engagement those individuals can become an additional source of information to potential patients and consumers. People trust peers more than brands and there is value in influencers extoling your product or procedure to ring loud. Be sure there is always transparency surrounding the relationship by including visible disclaimer language. 

Social media is rapidly changing and keeping up with the rules and regulations can feel like a full-time job—but in healthcare we’re used to that! Hopefully, the recommendations in this blog will help you navigate FTC guidelines—in addition to Regulatory guidelines—on social media for your life sciences brand. With the right attitude and clearly defined relationships about the content you’re publishing on your channels, social media’s benefits can hugely outweigh the risks.


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Exploring Hospitals’ Use of Facebook: Thematic Analysis #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

Exploring Hospitals’ Use of Facebook: Thematic Analysis #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Background: Although health care organizations such as hospitals and clinics have widely embraced social media as a means to educate the community on health topics and increase patient loyalty and satisfaction, little is known about the content these organizations actually share when using social media channels.

Objective: This study aimed to explore the types of content US hospitals post on their Facebook pages and how hospitals’ Facebook activities differ with regard to content types.

Methods: We collected and thematically analyzed more than 1700 Facebook posts made over a 3-month period by 17 US hospitals. During the first phase, the 2 researchers coded a set of 159 posts and created an initial thematic web of content. During the second phase, the researchers coded the remaining posts and then revised, refined, and validated the initial web of content accordingly. Coding consensus was achieved on 1184 of the 1548 analyzable sampled posts (76.49%).

Results: We identified a list of 13 unique health social media post themes and classified those themes into 3 thematic groups that included announcingsharing, and recognizingactivities. The most frequently used theme was sharing health information, which appeared in 35.81% (424/1184) of the posts analyzed. Such posts sought to provide health tips and advice to community members. Recognizing special days and recognizing employees were the second and third most frequently used themes, respectively, with 14.95% (177/1184) and 11.82% (140/1184) of the posts containing those themes. The frequency of these themes was surprising as the content was geared more toward stakeholders internal to the organization, although most previous literature has focused on social media as a tool to connect with external stakeholders. In addition, we found many of the posts involved more than one theme, and selected sets of themes co-occurred frequently. For example, 25.4% (45/177) of the posts recognizing special days also included content to share health information, and approximately 38% (32/85) of the posts announcing research activities also included content to share health information. Finally, we found similarities and differences between the sampled hospitals in terms of the types of content they posted more frequently on their Facebook pages.

Conclusions: Hospitals use Facebook as an inexpensive way to educate people on health and wellness topics and to communicate different types of information and news to the public audience. Hospitals and clinics that are expanding their social media activities or are starting to embark on social media strategies can use the results of this study to better formulate their activities on Facebook.


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Social Media Lessons from the Best American Hospitals | 

Social Media Lessons from the Best American Hospitals |  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

The best social media marketing blends storytelling and PR. It seamlessly integrates advertising and relationship building, fighting its way through the social noise while never losing sight of the human stories driving brand successes. Social media for the nation’s top hospitals is no different, with an extra bit of responsibility: As community cornerstones, hospitals have a unique platform for educating and inspiring the public. Hospitals with top-notch social media aren’t just using their channels as marketing machines—they’re creating healthier communities.

The team at Convince & Convert investigated what successful social media looks like for the best hospitals in the U.S. We collected our research in a detailed report, The Best of Social Media from America’s Top Hospitals, and rounded up the highlights below.

How We Identified the Best Hospital Social Media Posts

Using Rival IQ, we gathered all public Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter posts from the top 53 U.S. hospitals, as determined by bed size and the U.S. News 2017–2018 Best Hospitals Honor Roll. We then looked exclusively at posts from February 2018, giving us a data set of approximately 10,000 social posts. Engagement metrics from Rival IQ helped use narrow that group of 10,000 to the best 50 posts. We also limited each hospital to a maximum of five posts and chose to include posts boosted by paid support.

Download the Report Now

What Makes a Great Hospital Twitter Post

Twitter is a high-priority channel for the nation’s top hospitals. Most tweet an average of three times per day, and the best-performing hospital Twitter accounts often post much more. The health and medical communities are also active on Twitter chats and seasonal hashtags like #HeartMonth, and hospitals who participated saw notable boosts in engagement.


The type of content posted affected engagement, as well: photos attracted the most, followed by videos and posts containing links.

What Makes a Great Hospital Facebook Post

The most “loved” Facebook posts were (perhaps unsurprisingly) videos showcasing patient stories, moving recoveries, and other successful outcomes.


Uplifting stories weren’t the only kind of content driving engagement, however: Audiences also engaged using Facebook’s “sad” and “angry” reactions on posts commemorating patients who had passed, research on preventable disease, etc. Also of note is the content that didn’t perform well on Facebook: Posts linking to other content were the most common post type published by top hospitals yet attracted the least engagement.

Download the Report Now

What Makes a Good Hospital Instagram Post

Faces appear to be the key to engaging Instagram posts for hospitals. Half of the best posts included two or more faces. Carousel posts also attracted high engagement, contradicting most other data on carousels’ effect on social engagement. Posts with a strong storytelling angle—behind the scenes photos of doctors on the job or moments from the hospital’s history—attracted the most comments on any other post type. Hospitals also used hashtags to draw eyes to their posts, averaging about three per post (but no more than eight).


The Hospitals Leading Social Media

From our group of 53, we narrowed our list of hospitals to the top 20 on social media according to the size of their audience, post volume, engagement rate per post, and total engagement during the month of February. A few trends emerged among this elite group, including an obvious preference for Twitter and Facebook over Instagram. The top five hospitals showed an even more serious commitment to Twitter and Facebook and published twice as frequently as the group average. The top three were especially committed to strategy and included:

  1. NewYork-Presbyterian
  2. Cleveland Clinic
  3. Mayo Clinic

Every hospital on this cream-of-the-crop list exhibited smart social media strategy, but NewYork-Presbyterian stood out for a few reasons. One was its larger-than-average publishing window (9 a.m. to 7 p.m.) and its commitment to publishing content on weekends, not just weekdays. NYP posts to Facebook and Instagram a minimum of once per day, averages more than seven tweets per day, and participates in real-time Twitter chats like #HealthyHeartTalk. NYP’s social also prioritizes storytelling and visual content like none other. Their strategy is photo- and video-driven, and the payoff is evident.


Hospitals that prioritize storytelling and visual content see higher engagement on social media. CLICK TO TWEET

Learn from the Nation’s Best Hospitals

The best hospitals on social media are masters of bringing a human face to the services they provide. They show a rigorous commitment to storytelling, original visual content, being a reliable presence in their audience’s social feeds. Our full report includes even more examples of the top social posts, more data on publishing habits and engagement, and an even deeper analysis of our findings.


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How to improve patient outcomes with digital health

How to improve patient outcomes with digital health | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Digital health solutions that work in the real world must also be designed to effectively support the patient’s tasks and goals, while being engaging to use. In other words, they need to be built with patients, not for them, say Alex Butler and Gavin Birchnall.

There is currently a great deal of focus on patient centricity within the pharmaceutical industry. Most industry stakeholders now believe that one of the most exciting opportunities for healthcare is the development of digital health technology that can manage disease, improve outcomes for patients and positively support healthcare professionals to improve the provision of care.

It is commonly agreed that in order to be effective, these solutions need to be truly built around patients and their needs. The concept of patient-centred design is now becoming part of mainstream discussion. However, this goes much deeper than simply designing a user-friendly interface. Solutions that work in the real world must also be designed to effectively support the patient’s tasks and goals, while being engaging to use. In other words, they need to be built with patients, not for them.

This starts with truly understanding patients’ problems through in-depth research and analysis. It is important that any pharma-sponsored support programme aligns with strategic objectives but also rigorously meets real patient need and is differentiated from currently-available solutions. Building the value proposition should be done collaboratively, and through a process of co-creation. When patients truly partner with clinicians, academia, pharma and health technology experts, the results can be incredible.

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Why Instagram Is the Worst Social Media for Mental Health

Why Instagram Is the Worst Social Media for Mental Health | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Instagram is the worst social media network for mental health and wellbeing, according to a recent survey of almost 1,500 teens and young adults. While the photo-based platform got points for self-expression and self-identity, it was also associated with high levels of anxiety, depression, bullying and FOMO, or the “fear of missing out.”

Out of five social networks included in the survey, YouTube received the highest marks for health and wellbeing and was the only site that received a net positive score by respondents. Twitter came in second, followed by Facebook and then Snapchat—with Instagram bringing up the rear.

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8 Technology Trends in Healthcare to Watch in 2018

8 Technology Trends in Healthcare to Watch in 2018 | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

While healthcare has historically been slow to adopt technology, the industry is about to witness significant changes over the next several years. The digital health market is expected to reach $206 billion by 2020. Leading companies are already redefining themselves with digital transformation, applied to their main functional areas with customer-centric approach.

 

For us, keeping an eye on the latest industry-specific tech trends is essential. These trends are typically best showcased at the world's leading events—in our case, healthcare conferences. Today we're going to share our insights gained at Med-Tech Innovation Expo, spotlighting 8 major technology trends in healthcare to watch in 2018.

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Gamification in Healthcare: Just Play or Real Value?  #esante #hcsmeufr #digitalhealth

Gamification in Healthcare: Just Play or Real Value?  #esante #hcsmeufr #digitalhealth | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
The following is a guest blog post by Thomas McFarland, Kerry Harbeck, and Andrea Kamper from Atos. As early as the 1900s, educators started using rewards to motivate learners. Today, we know that …

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Using social media to understand health risks and deliver health interventions at scale


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Want to score on social, pharma? Follow Sanofi's lead, experts say | FiercePharma

Want to score on social, pharma? Follow Sanofi's lead, experts say | FiercePharma | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

 

Sanofi could have just let it go. When actress Roseanne Barr blamed its sleep aid Ambien for a racist post, the pharma company could have simply ignored it and let the Twitterverse call out the inaccuracy. Instead, Sanofi seized the moment and responded with a pithy, yet relevant and product-accurate tweet response that wryly noted: “While all pharmaceutical treatments have side effects, racism is not a known side effect of any Sanofi medication.”

That sort of real-time social media response isn't easy to pull off effectively. Consumer brands like Moon Pie, Wendy's and Oreo do it regularly, but there are also plenty of big brand social media flops to make companies think twice about going for the clever retort.

 

Which makes Sanofi’s leap even more significant: It's a regulated pharma company that has to send its messaging through compliance reviews. But Sanofi’s U.S. communication team moved fast enough to write, vet and post the response within hours of the original tweet, stepping into the cultural conversation as it happened.

 
 

Social media experts applauded and consumers responded—the post has been retweeted 68,800 times and liked by 186,000 accounts. It also garnered more than 6,100 comments with many people replying  “thank you,” “well done” or posting congratulatory memes. The previous top performing post from @SanofiUS garnered 78 retweets and 241 likes.

 

Pharma marketing insiders, meanwhile, praised Sanofi for its message, timing and boost to pharma social media credibility overall.

Julie Hurvitz Aliaga, vice president of social media at CMI/Compas said via email, “They tackled it before it had an opportunity to be an issue, educated about their drug and what it does not do, and won praise for doing so—as being a company who is not going to sit back and watch—but take action to educate.”

The balance of humor and seriousness was important, noted Klick Health’s senior director of social practice Brad Einarsen in a blog post: “The dry wit that infuses the tweet itself is fantastically balanced. There are many very serious issues surrounding these events, and we cannot lose sight of that, but the understated facts really pull off the corporate message and provide just the right amount of spark for others on Twitter to carry it along.”

 

RELATED: Pharma's social media strategies are growing up—and working better, too, report finds

Wendy Blackburn, vice president at healthcare and pharma agency Intouch Solutions, added her own kudos and hope for the industry: “Good for Sanofi for standing up and speaking out. I applaud their ability to react with swift action. Done the right way, we’d all like to see more of this from pharma.”

For pharma companies that might be interested in doing that, she offered a few tips. Companies should listen especially for well-known people or celebrity mentions of their brands because whether positive or negative, those get a lot of attention on social media. She also advised setting up an action plan so that the company can act quickly in those moments. And finally, just do it.

“Respond as immediately as possible. Current events move too quickly. Tomorrow is too late,” Blackburn said.

 

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How Could Digital Technology Make An Impact On Primary Care?

How Could Digital Technology Make An Impact On Primary Care? | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

General practitioners are the first contact point for patients and the building blocks of healthcare. Where do they stand on the issue of digital tech? The Medical Futurist Institute conducted extensive, survey-based research about the willingness of GPs to use the latest innovations in their practice and their attitude towards the future. Let’s see how could digital technology make an impact on primary care.

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Novartis VP: Digital therapeutics, like pills, are just another kind of treatment

Novartis VP: Digital therapeutics, like pills, are just another kind of treatment | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
A drug no longer needs to be a tangible object, according to panelist at the BIO 2018 convention in Boston. The way the pharma industry looks at medication is evolving and may be including new tech-focused treatments, such as digital therapeutics.

“If you think about the trajectory of medicine what is a drug these days: is it a pill, is it an injection, is it infusion, is it gene therapy? We’ve created some artificial constructs in the industry,” Jeremy Sohn, vice president and global head of digital business development and licensing at Novartis, said at a panel discussion on Wednesday. “The thing that is always constant, as the FDA will tell us, is it is about data-driven processes that allow us to demonstrate efficacy and truth.”

While the term digital therapeutic has been broadly used, many in the industry are starting to carve out a definition and shed light on what can be considered a digital therapeutic as opposed to some other kind of health technology.

“Digital therapeutics became a term that meant directly digital applied to medicine, and I think what we are talking about here goes a step further to [make it] more clear what we mean by prescription digital therapeutics: digital being the medicine and digital directly treating the condition, having gone through clinical trials with an FDA regulating its treatment, such that it can be prescribed by a doctor, and covered by insurance, just like any medicine today,” Eddie Martucci, CEO of Akili Labs, said at the panel discussion. “So the word medicine doesn't have to mean a pill it can mean something digital as long as it is having a safe treatment effect.”

Much like a physical drug, a digital therapeutic must run through clinical trials, demonstrate efficacy and meet fundamental safety codes, said Corey McCann, founder of Pear Therapeutics, a company that has created a digital prescription treatment for addiction.

Now big pharma has begun to turn to the new technologies as ways of the future. In March Pear Therapeutics, inked a deal with Novartis to develop two digital therapeutics, one for multiple sclerosis and another for schizophrenia.

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Patient engagement or social media marketing?

Patient engagement or social media marketing? | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

The rising use of social media creates an obvious opportunity for certain parties, such as pharmaceutical companies, to engage with the public in new ways.

Advocates of pharmaceutical companies reaching out to potential customers online suggest the industry has been too reluctant to invest heavily in social media strategies, mainly because of a vague regulatory environment. But skeptics of the practice say the pharmaceutical industry is already gung ho about social media, which some companies appear to be using to circumvent restrictions on direct-to-consumer advertising, a practice legal in only the United States and New Zealand.

In a recent report called “Engaging patients through social media,” the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics states that “the strategies that pharmaceutical companies use to engage with social media could be categorized as low-risk and less innovative than those employed in other industries.”

The report notes that use of social media among US adults has grown from 8% in 2005 to 72% by 2013, and that Facebook is the fourth most popular source of health information in the United Kingdom. These numbers are sure to increase, the report suggests, as so-called digital natives — those as comfortable texting and tweeting as they are walking and breathing — grow into adulthood and become more concerned about their health.

Yet the pharmaceutical industry has been slow to embrace social media, claims the IMS Institute, a company based in Danbury, Connecticut. One reason is the lack of guidance from health regulators — in the US, Canada and Europe — about using social media. In the US, for example, the only restriction seems to be on the promotion of off-label uses of drugs. Some companies may be reluctant to invest heavily in a social media strategy for fear of wasting time and resources should strict regulations come into force.

The rising use of social media creates an obvious opportunity for certain parties, such as pharmaceutical companies, to engage with the public in new ways.

Image courtesy of MicroWorks/Thinkstock
 

Other concerns include how — or whether — to handle claims of adverse events received through social media and how to measure return on investment. New strategies would also be required to respond much more quickly to consumer concerns. A slow response can escalate into a public-relations nightmare with tweets, Tumblr and Facebook comments going viral in hours.

“Users of social media now expect to be able to have a conversation with pharmaceutical companies when they face uncertainties,” states the report. “If there is no conversation, or only a standardized answer, it could lead to frustration and be of little overall benefit to both involved parties.”

But what does engaging patients really mean in this context? “When you talk about engagement, it is really about direct marketing to the consumer,” says Timothy Mackey, an investigator for the San Diego Center for Patient Safety at the University of California San Diego.

In a 2011 paper entitled “Prevalence and global health implications of social media in direct-to-consumer drug advertising,” Mackey and colleagues looked at the social media presence of the 10 largest global pharmaceutical corporations. All were active on Facebook, Twitter, sponsored blogs and other social media platforms, and 80% had YouTube channels. Many individual drugs also had dedicated Facebook pages and Twitter feeds.

This has led to a new form of direct-to-consumer advertising, developed for interactive social media, which the researchers have dubbed eDTCA 2.0. Though some of these websites state they are intended solely for US residents, the Internet transcends borders. These websites don’t appear to restrict access to web users from outside the US, Mackey and colleagues note in their paper.

“The new consumer is one that is global and connected online, a profile that precisely fits the patient/consumer of eDTCA 2.0,” the paper states. “Public health policy must take into account this new consumer and the rapidly developing digital environment.”

Some websites set up by drug companies (and medical-device manufacturers) to create communities of potential consumers have scant corporate branding and appear to exist primarily to offer free services. These sites, called patient-engagement portals, might offer guidance on how to manage a particular medical problem, such as high blood pressure. They may offer risk assessment tools for sleep apnea or any number of conditions. Some even offer online patient coaches.

“What they are really doing is engaging directly with patients and collecting consumer information, which they may or may not categorize as PHI, or protected health information,” says Mackey. “It’s about getting information directly from the consumer, mining data and using that for their own marketing purposes. That’s why these websites exist.”




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Seven Steps for Managing Adverse Events in Social Media

Seven Steps for Managing Adverse Events in Social Media | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

In an ever-changing pharma environment staying connected is vital. Amidst regulatory challenges and uncertainty of new channels, the pharma industry is beginning to embrace social media to empower patients and healthcare providers. Social platforms are uniquely designed to support patient and provider needs perhaps more directly and efficiently than traditional channels. Social technologies can be leveraged to support patient engagement, ultimately leading to healthier patient outcomes.

 

 


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mHealth Economics 2017 – Current Status and Future Trends in Mobile Health

mHealth Economics 2017 – Current Status and Future Trends in Mobile Health | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

1. About the mHealth Economics program

The mHealth Economics program has been exploring the developments of digital health for 7 years now, and counting. Since the first report on the mobile health app market, a total of 6.7 million data points have been revealed, which illustrate mHealth and digital health market developments dating back as far as 2010. The mHealth Economics program is the largest digital health research program globally, with more than 15,000 participants since its beginnings. This is the first of two reports of the mHealth Economics Program 2017/2018. Download the 2nd report (How To Monetize Mobile Health Apps) for free here.

The aim of the program is to reveal current market conditions, and future trends in the digital health arena. It examines how successful mHealth app publishers are operating, how the market is changing, and where it is heading. In doing so, the report helps stakeholders to understand current and future market developments.

15,000 participants since 2010

Each year the program emphasizes several trending topics relevant to digital health. For 2017/2018, trending topics include; digital health business models, typical project budgets and digital health accelerator programs. Also new to this yearsprogram is the release of not only one, but several free-to-download reports.

The mHealth Economics program go-to resource for all digital health stakeholders

This year more than 2,400 decision makers and experts in mobile and digital health have partaken in the market survey and have contributed to this years report.

The majority of digital health practitioners come from Europe (47%) and the US (36%). 11% come from the Asian-Pacific region, and only a small share from South America and Africa.

 

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DIGITAL HEALTH TECH VISION 2018

DIGITAL HEALTH TECH VISION 2018 | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Where technology is deeply embedded in our lives—and the lines between business and personal are blurred more than ever. Healthcare organizations are increasingly unleashing the power of intelligent technologies, using them to deliver personalized, efficient and informed care. However, with such innovation comes responsibility. For people to get the full benefits of digitally enabled healthcare services, providers and health plans must prioritize trust and responsibility. The Accenture Digital Health Technology Vision 2018 explores five trends that underscore the importance of building a foundation of trust as technology has a greater impact on our lives: Citizen AI, Extended Reality, Data Veracity, Frictionless Business and Internet of Thinking. We see these trends in two categories—the enablers of an intelligent healthcare enterprise, and the consequences. The technology enablers Extended Reality, Frictionless Business and Internet of Thinking demonstrate how integration and personalization can help people in new ways. Citizen AI and Data Veracity reveal the consequences when technology is deeply intertwined in our lives and in our care.

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Millennials: From Social Media in Healthcare to Rich Patient Relationships with Cutting-Edge Communications 

Millennials: From Social Media in Healthcare to Rich Patient Relationships with Cutting-Edge Communications  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

For business leaders, millennials are a source of intrigue, opportunity, and sometimes even apprehension. When it comes to the healthcare industry and its trends, this is no small consideration — and it's not just about social media in healthcare. As Steve Bullock at MediaPostpoints out, millennials are plugging into "online forums, social media, health apps, wearables … and want multi-channel access to all their healthcare-related business."

Reaching digital natives goes beyond social media in healthcare — it's about providing more robust and integrated ways to engage with and care for the millennial population.

Millennials' love for dynamic, real-time, interactive digital experiences is changing how healthcare organizations reach them, take care of them, and earn their business and loyalty. This demographic, aged 20 to 35, wields spending power on the scale of $1.3 trillion — the biggest spend out there, according to Agency Ascend — and they are also the fastest-growing segment of the workforce, according to Inc.

In an age of immediate, personalized interactions, building communications channels that reflect millennials' wants and needs will shape how the healthcare industry builds its own future, influencing how offerings and opportunities evolve over time. Here are some pathways to earning millennials' attention and loyalty, while also keeping digital-first healthcare solutions on the cutting edge of quality and compliance.

Millennials Put in the Healthcare Homework

One of the healthcare trends that's shaping the future of the industry is how millennials use their digital resources to educate themselves as patients before they talk to their doctors. As Bullock reports in his article, 54 percent of millennials have consulted as many as seven information sources for purposes of self-diagnosis.

That's social media in healthcare at work, but the conversation grows even louder when healthcare organizations enter the picture.

Digital natives are already creating a profound impact on healthcare, and millennials are on the leading edge of this change.

Digital Natives Expect Speedy Solutions and DIY Options

Digital solutions are increasingly cloud based, and with the cloud comes the agility of unified communications. This is important in healthcare, an industry in which dynamic, flexible, and speedy person-to-person contact is critical to patient outcomes.

Unified communications solutions are capable of extending far beyond the more familiar elements such as automated routing that cuts down on patient wait time. For example, the patient may benefit from an impromptu telehealth session. In this case, a voice call can evolve into a video conference from whatever device is in play. Healthcare professionals can take the session a further step if necessary, instantly bringing in a second opinion or a companion consultation with the ease of a click, tap, or swipe.

Patient engagement strategies are changing: The digital world is increasingly a self-serve ecosystem, and healthcare is no exception. Take appointment scheduling and records management, for example. Millennials want self-service options that let them skip phone queues — they don't expect to spend time on hold — and they don't want to repeatedly fill out paper forms. Unified communications can satisfy these patients, creating on-screen billing access, pre-visit and symptom-input tools, and do-it-yourself scheduling.

Personalization: Rich Relationships Run on Data

Data in the digital space is on everybody's mind, and when it's put to nuanced, permissions-based uses, patient data helps physicians build insight-rich relationships.

Millennials expect conversational commerce. This means a lot more than relying upon data to simply prompt appointment reminder texts. It's about deeper lines of two-way communication that bring a patient's history and a physician's records together in private, selective, compassionate ways that link every visit — in-person or not — to the spectrum of care the patient has experienced.

Millennials and Beyond: Healthcare Depends on QoS

With the well-being of every patient in play, business communications downtime during physician–patient appointments is simply unacceptable. The good news is that newer solutions in the unified communications space include SD-WAN systems that can ensure backup communications reliability should a healthcare organization's MPLS or other in-house system experience an interruption.

And since solutions like SD-WAN are cloud based and never need a physical upgrade, they're also economical ways to meet healthcare's critical QoS standards.

Social Media in Healthcare: Embracing the Digital Future

Digital natives are already creating a profound impact on healthcare, and millennials are on the leading edge of this change. But the industry must also keep its eye on the next up-and-coming generation. As Generation Z begins to drive business in the years to come, they will bring billions in their own spending power to the table.

For the healthcare organizations that successfully engage these younger patients, the steps considered here are pathways to the industry's future. Embracing the future of healthcare means the start of a vibrant and healthy digital conversation for every physician and patient.


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News Media in Western Europe: Populist Views Divide Public Opinion - Pew Research Center

News Media in Western Europe: Populist Views Divide Public Opinion - Pew Research Center | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

In Western Europe, public views of the news media are divided by populist leanings – more than left-right political positions – according to a new Pew Research Center public opinion survey conducted in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Across all eight countries, those who hold populist views value and trust the news media less, and they also give the media lower marks for coverage of major issues, such as immigration, the economy and crime.1

Trust in the news media dips lowest in Spain, France, the UK and Italy, with roughly a quarter of people with populist views in each country expressing confidence in the news media. By contrast, those without populist leanings are 8 to 31 percentage points more likely to at least somewhat trust the news media across the countries surveyed.

In Spain, Germany and Sweden, public trust in the media also divides along the left-right ideological spectrum, but the magnitude of difference pales in comparison to the divides between those with and without populist leanings.

When it comes to how the news media perform on key functions, broad majorities of the publics rate the news media highly for generally covering the most important issues of the day. This includes majorities of both those who do and do not hold populist views, though there are still significant differences in the magnitude of those ratings. More substantial divides between those two groups occur around how the news media do in covering three specific issues asked about here: the economy, immigration and crime. (See detailed tables for more information.)


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These 15 Doctors are Dominating Twitter in 2018

These 15 Doctors are Dominating Twitter in 2018 | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Physicians are connecting with their patients in more ways than ever.

With Twitter, these medical professionals have found an outlet that channels their expertise while supporting followers.

Social media has emerged as a key nexus for doctors to engage with patients, participate in meaningful discourse, and promote thought leadership in their respective areas of expertise. Whether they’re connecting with professionals on LinkedIn or developing digital marketing strategies on Facebook, physicians now have access to every tool imaginable to craft the online presence that best suits their needs.

On Twitter especially, doctors can meet patients on a level playing field to discuss treatment or address wider developments throughout the healthcare industry. For physicians and medical practices looking to boost their digital profile, these 15 doctors and their Twitter accounts serve as successful examples of leveraging social media to serve patients — and their professional profiles.

 

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