#eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial
110.1K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
onto #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial
Scoop.it!

Socioeconomic Disparities in Fatalistic Beliefs About Cancer Prevention and the Internet - Lee - 2012 - Journal of Communication - Wiley Online Library

Socioeconomic Disparities in Fatalistic Beliefs About Cancer Prevention and the Internet - Lee - 2012 - Journal of Communication - Wiley Online Library | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Giuseppe Fattori's insight:

Given the importance of public information environment in cancer control, it is theoretically and practically important to explore how people's media use to acquire health information influences their beliefs about cancer prevention. In the current research, we focus on the role of the Internet in shaping fatalistic beliefs about cancer prevention (cancer fatalism)

more...
No comment yet.
#eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial
E-Health promotion. #web2salute. Health 2.0
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Asl ospedali social media: le "TOP 5" su Twitter e Facebook

Asl ospedali social media: le "TOP 5" su Twitter e Facebook | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Asl Ospedali Social Media: presentiamo la classifica delle “TOP 5” Aziende Sanitarie e Ospedaliere italiane su Twitter e Facebook. Dal 2013 analizziamo la presenza delle Aziende Sanitarie e degli ospedali nei social media.

Risale infatti al luglio di quell’anno una prima analisi del tema “Asl e ospedali ai tempi di twitter” condotta dal corso di marketing sociale Università di Bologna in collaborazione con FIASO – Federazione Italiana Aziende Sanitarie e Ospedaliere.

Come previsto dalle analisi, twitter ha perso il suo fascino a favore di facebook mentre, a differenza di quanto auspicato, non c’è ancora un utilizzo integrato delle varie piattaforme social (twitter, facebook e youtube).

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Contemporary Challenges in Marketing
Scoop.it!

News Media in Western Europe: Populist Views Divide Public Opinion - Pew Research Center

News Media in Western Europe: Populist Views Divide Public Opinion - Pew Research Center | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

In Western Europe, public views of the news media are divided by populist leanings – more than left-right political positions – according to a new Pew Research Center public opinion survey conducted in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Across all eight countries, those who hold populist views value and trust the news media less, and they also give the media lower marks for coverage of major issues, such as immigration, the economy and crime.1

Trust in the news media dips lowest in Spain, France, the UK and Italy, with roughly a quarter of people with populist views in each country expressing confidence in the news media. By contrast, those without populist leanings are 8 to 31 percentage points more likely to at least somewhat trust the news media across the countries surveyed.

In Spain, Germany and Sweden, public trust in the media also divides along the left-right ideological spectrum, but the magnitude of difference pales in comparison to the divides between those with and without populist leanings.

When it comes to how the news media perform on key functions, broad majorities of the publics rate the news media highly for generally covering the most important issues of the day. This includes majorities of both those who do and do not hold populist views, though there are still significant differences in the magnitude of those ratings. More substantial divides between those two groups occur around how the news media do in covering three specific issues asked about here: the economy, immigration and crime. (See detailed tables for more information.)


Via Cambridge Marketing College
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

These 15 Doctors are Dominating Twitter in 2018

These 15 Doctors are Dominating Twitter in 2018 | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Physicians are connecting with their patients in more ways than ever.

With Twitter, these medical professionals have found an outlet that channels their expertise while supporting followers.

Social media has emerged as a key nexus for doctors to engage with patients, participate in meaningful discourse, and promote thought leadership in their respective areas of expertise. Whether they’re connecting with professionals on LinkedIn or developing digital marketing strategies on Facebook, physicians now have access to every tool imaginable to craft the online presence that best suits their needs.

On Twitter especially, doctors can meet patients on a level playing field to discuss treatment or address wider developments throughout the healthcare industry. For physicians and medical practices looking to boost their digital profile, these 15 doctors and their Twitter accounts serve as successful examples of leveraging social media to serve patients — and their professional profiles.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Is Social Media Useful in Understanding Side Effects?

Is Social Media Useful in Understanding Side Effects? | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

“Oh god, I really hate you prednisone, I can’t sleep because of you.” It’s only 66 characters long, but Twitter messages like this one may become a critical tool for understanding and reporting a drug’s side effects in the future.

As people have become more and more comfortable sharing personal information online, including personal health information, pharmacoepidemiologists — the health care professionals who closely track a drug’s benefits and side effects in the general population — now see social media sites like Twitter and Facebook as vast troves of data about prescription drug use in America.

It would be an understatement to say that traditional systems for reporting drug side effects, including the FDA’s MedWatch program, are failing. One of the larger published papers to look at the problem, a review of 37 studies from 12 countries, found that adverse effects of prescription drugs were underreported 94% of the time, meaning that a patient experienced a drug side effect but it was not reported to the appropriate local, regional or national drug safety surveillance systems.

The study, published in 2006 in Drug Safety, found that the problem was even more pronounced for common, less serious side effects — that is, the side effects patients are most likely to experience are the ones that are least likely to be reported. Severe or serious adverse effects of drugs were reported 80% of the time, compared to 95% for more common side effects.

 

 

Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Video consultation service Doctor on Demand raised $74 million so everyone can see a doctor anytime –

Video consultation service Doctor on Demand raised $74 million so everyone can see a doctor anytime – | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Healing America’s broken healthcare industry has been at the top of the priority list for almost every politician, entrepreneur and inventor for at least the past 40 years.

Costs continue to climb (roughly 5 percent this year) and spending is already 20 percent of the nation’s GDP. For the trillions of dollars Americans spend on healthcare, they’re getting declining services, more frequent ailments and a steadily diverging standard of care for the rich and the poor in the country.

Something needs to be done — and venture capitalists and some of the biggest names in finance led by Goldman Sachs  are investing $74 million in a technology startup they see as a potential solution.

The company is Doctor On Demand, and its solution is video-based telemedicine.

The new funding, led by Goldman Sachs and Princeville Global (with participation from existing investors, including Venrock, Shasta Ventures and Tenaya Capital), will be used to continue the company’s rapid expansion in the U.S. and abroad — and brings the company’s total financing to $160 million.

“This trend of consumerization, which we’re leading, is really going to result in much greater patient-driven healthcare experiences, which will save the patient a lot of money,” says company chief executive Hill Ferguson .

Ferguson knows that the arc of internet services bends toward on demand and he says that healthcare should be no different. “Most people have no idea they can see a board-certified physician on their phone from their bed while they’re sick at two in the morning with a five-minute wait time,” he says.

That’s essentially the service that Doctor On Demand provides.

While the company’s consultations aren’t a panacea for everything that ails the healthcare industry, Ferguson claims his company’s board-certified staff can handle 90 percent of the consultations that happen every day in urgent-care facilities and for $300 less than insurers currently pay out.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Health Information Technology: An Updated Systematic Review With a Focus on Meaningful Use 

Health Information Technology: An Updated Systematic Review With a Focus on Meaningful Use  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Abstract

Background:

Incentives offered by the U.S. government have spurred marked increases in use of health information technology (IT).

Purpose:

To update previous reviews and examine recent evidence that relates health IT functionalities prescribed in meaningful use regulations to key aspects of health care.

Data Sources:

English-language articles in PubMed from January 2010 to August 2013.

Study Selection:

236 studies, including pre–post and time-series designs and clinical trials that related the use of health IT to quality, safety, or efficiency.

Data Extraction:

Two independent reviewers extracted data on functionality, study outcomes, and context.

Data Synthesis:

Fifty-seven percent of the 236 studies evaluated clinical decision support and computerized provider order entry, whereas other meaningful use functionalities were rarely evaluated. Fifty-six percent of studies reported uniformly positive results, and an additional 21% reported mixed-positive effects. Reporting of context and implementation details was poor, and 61% of studies did not report any contextual details beyond basic information.

Limitation:

Potential for publication bias, and evaluated health IT systems and outcomes were heterogeneous and incompletely described.

Conclusion:

Strong evidence supports the use of clinical decision support and computerized provider order entry. However, insufficient reporting of implementation and context of use makes it impossible to determine why some health IT implementations are successful and others are not. The most important improvement that can be made in health IT evaluations is increased reporting of the effects of implementation and context.

Primary Funding Source:

Office of the National Coordinator.

 
In the United States, adoption of health information technology (IT) has been accelerated by the meaningful use incentive program, which provides financial incentives to individual health care providers and organizations that demonstrate that they use “certified” health IT to meet a set of several use criteria specified by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (1, 2). This increase in use has been accompanied by a concomitant increase in the number of published evaluations of health IT. Because of the rapidly expanding evidence base, the Office of the National Coordinator requested a systematic update of the literature (3). The objective of this review is to update previous reviews (4–6) and examine recent evidence that relates health IT functionalities prescribed in meaningful use regulations to health care quality (including process, health, and patient and provider satisfaction outcomes), safety (including medication safety and other manifestations of patient safety), and efficiency (including costs, utilization, timeliness, and time burden of health care).
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from GAFAMS, STARTUPS & INNOVATION IN HEALTHCARE by PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

AI Software Writing AI Software For Healthcare?  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth

AI Software Writing AI Software For Healthcare?  #hcsmeufr #esante #digitalhealth | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

At the World Medical Innovation Forum this week, participants were polled with a loaded question:

“Do you think healthcare will become better or worse from the use of AI?”

Across the respondents, 98 percent said it would be either “Better” or “Much Better” and not a single one thought it would become “Much Worse.” This is an interesting statistic, and the results were not entirely surprising, especially given that artificial intelligence was the theme for the meeting.

This continual stream of adoption of new technologies in both clinical and post clinical settings is remarkable. Today, healthcare is a technology operation. As a case in point, outside of the array of MDs and medical professionals presenting at the forum, there was clearly a strong, advanced technology thread weaved throughout the conversations of the traditional topics of pathology, radiology, bioinformatics, electronic medical records (EMR), and standard healthcare provider issues.

As an example, a panel of senior technology experts from Microsoft, Cisco Systems, Dell EMC, Qualcomm, and Google joined research and information officers from Partners Healthcare and Massachusetts General Hospital to discuss the challenges in what they called “Data Engineering in Healthcare: Liberating Value.” That is a serious title for a panel.

Data portability was clearly a key topic, as was security and the public cloud.

The underlying issue with the cloud is that the EMR was never really designed to be portable.

Health records existed with institutional walls, and were not originally intended for real time care, but more as a means of tracking costs and transactions as the patient traveled through the various systems. As the EMR has not only become more feature rich, the ability to mine that data inside of them with ML and AI methods is clearly at the forefront of everyone’s mind right now.

There was discussion of episodic systems wrapped in policy and technology – this really isn’t quite how we can gain the maximum knowledge from the healthcare version of a Digital Me. A digital object containing all of our many and varied health related attributes. The challenges of discussing how to best build a “marketplace” and healthcare data exchanges and how to integrate “data marts” with existing EMR systems was obvious.


Via nrip, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
nrip's curator insight, April 30, 7:13 PM

AI can help clinicians and nurses do their job better. AI will never replace doctors, but doctors which use AI will replace doctors who dont.

Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Apple’s CareKit Puts mHealth in Consumers’ Hands

Apple’s CareKit Puts mHealth in Consumers’ Hands | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

The consumer-facing app platform has gone live with four apps, and at least two health system-sponsored apps are in the wings. But will providers care?

Apple’s open-source, consumer-facing mHealth platform – went live today with four apps.

Unlike its predecessor HealthKit, which debuted in 2014, CareKit puts the iOS platform out there on its own (the framework is available for free on GitHub) and lets consumers, mHealth app developers and healthcare providers decide what to do next. Whether that will prompt health systems to partner with app developers or take on their own mHealth projects remains to be seen.

The app features a Care Card, Symptom and Measurement Tracker and Insight Dashboard, accessible on an iPhone or Apple Watch. Its Connect and Collaborate tool also enables the user to share that information with family, friends and/or care team members.

For now, three companies have launched four apps on the platform – Glow has two apps, Nurture and Baby, which track pregnancy and newborn health, respectively; Informed Data Systems’ OneDrop app has a diabetes management app (soon to be paired with the company’s own Bluetooth-enabled blood glucose meter); and Iodine has a Start app that features a depression test, mood tracker and medication and side effect management features.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Public health use of digital technology to advance health equity

Public health use of digital technology to advance health equity | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Social media has become an ever-present aspect of life. Public health can increase its influence and impact on the social determinants of health and health equity by harnessing social media.

The NCCDH conducted surveys in 2012 and 2016 to assess how public health used social media and other digital tools for knowledge translation, relationship building, and specific public health roles to advance health equity.

Highlights:

  • Most participants thought social media had an important role in public health and were generally comfortable in online spaces.
  • Half of respondents were satisfied with their ability to use social media.
  • Social media was used more frequently for personal purposes, and was less present in professional settings.
  • More than one in five of those surveyed used Twitter or Facebook at least weekly for knowledge exchange.
  • Social media is being used to address public health equity roles.

These findings indicate that there is room to enhance the use of social media in public health practice. Capacity building and organizational policies that support social media use may help achieve this.

A version of this report is also published in the Journal of Public Health Policy: Ndumbe-Eyoh, S. & Mazzucco, A. Social media, knowledge translation, and action on the social determinants of health and health equity: A survey of public health practices. J Public Health Pol (2016) 37(Suppl 2): 249.

Use this resource to:

  • Describe how and why public health professionals use social media and other digital tools
  • Identify which social media platforms are most relevant for public health professionals
  • Explore areas for developing capacity for social media use

Reference:

National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health. (2017). Public health use of digital technology to advance health equity. Antigonish, NS: National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health, St. Francis Xavier University.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Social media and outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases: A systematic review of literature

Social media and outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases: A systematic review of literature | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Highlights

 

  • A systematic review of published articles on social media and emerging infectious disease.
  • Three major approaches are identified: assessment of public opinion, organization's social media use, and evaluation of information accuracy.
  • More theorization and methodologic rigor is needed.

 

Background

The public often turn to social media for information during emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) outbreaks. This study identified the major approaches and assessed the rigors in published research articles on EIDs and social media.

Methods

We searched 5 databases for published journal articles on EIDs and social media. We then evaluated these articles in terms of EIDs studied, social media examined, theoretical frameworks, methodologic approaches, and research findings.

Results

Thirty articles were included in the analysis (published between January 1, 2010, and March 1, 2016). EIDs that received most scholarly attention were H1N1 (or swine flu, n = 15), Ebola virus (n = 10), and H7N9 (or avian flu/bird flu, n = 2). Twitter was the most often studied social media (n = 17), followed by YouTube (n = 6), Facebook (n = 6), and blogs (n = 6). Three major approaches in this area of inquiry are identified: (1) assessment of the public's interest in and responses to EIDs, (2) examination of organizations' use of social media in communicating EIDs, and (3) evaluation of the accuracy of EID-related medical information on social media.

Conclusions

Although academic studies of EID communication on social media are on the rise, they still suffer from a lack of theorization and a need for more methodologic rigor.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Social media e salute: giornalismo di pubblica utilità. Lo sviluppo della rete oncologica del Piemonte e della Valle d'Aosta

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

The Role of Social Media in Clinical Trial Recruitment | National Lip…

Presentation at National Lipid Association Scientific Sessions, Philadelphia, May 2017
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Use of Social Network Sites for Communication Among Health Professionals: Systematic Review

Use of Social Network Sites for Communication Among Health Professionals: Systematic Review | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

ABSTRACT

Background: Although much research has been done investigating the roles of social network sites (SNSs) in linking patients and health professionals, there is a lack of information about their uses, benefits, and limitations in connecting health professions only for professional communication.

Objective: This review aimed to examine the utilization of SNSs for communication among health professionals in (1) frontline clinical practice, (2) professional networks, and (3) education and training to identify areas for future health communication research.

Methods: This review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. A systematic search of the literature published in the last 10 years (January 1, 2007, to March 1, 2017) was performed in March 2017, using the following electronic databases: MEDLINE via OvidSP, EMBASE, CINAHL Complete, and InfoSci-Journals. The searches were conducted using the following defined search terms: “social media” OR “social network” OR “social network site” OR “Facebook” OR “Twitter” OR “Linkedin” OR “Instagram” OR “Weibo” OR “Whatsapp” OR “Telegram” OR “WeChat” AND “health” OR “health profession.”

Results: Of the 6977 papers retrieved, a total of 33 studies were included in this review. They were exploratory in nature, and the majority used surveys (n=25) and interviews (n=6). All retrieved studies stated that SNSs enhanced effective communication and information sharing. SNSs were used for supporting delivering of clinical services, making referrals, and sharing information. They were beneficial to network building and professional collaboration. SNSs were novel tools to enhance educational interactions among peers, students, instructors, and preceptors. The application of SNSs came with restraints in technical knowledge, concerns on data protection, privacy and liability, issues in professionalism, and data protection.

Conclusions: SNSs provide platforms facilitating efficient communication, interactions, and connections among health professionals in frontline clinical practice, professional networks, education, and training with limitations identified as technical knowledge, professionalism, and risks of data protection. The evolving use of SNSs necessitates robust research to explore the full potential and the relative effectiveness of SNSs in professional communication.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

How to improve patient outcomes with digital health

How to improve patient outcomes with digital health | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Digital health solutions that work in the real world must also be designed to effectively support the patient’s tasks and goals, while being engaging to use. In other words, they need to be built with patients, not for them, say Alex Butler and Gavin Birchnall.

There is currently a great deal of focus on patient centricity within the pharmaceutical industry. Most industry stakeholders now believe that one of the most exciting opportunities for healthcare is the development of digital health technology that can manage disease, improve outcomes for patients and positively support healthcare professionals to improve the provision of care.

It is commonly agreed that in order to be effective, these solutions need to be truly built around patients and their needs. The concept of patient-centred design is now becoming part of mainstream discussion. However, this goes much deeper than simply designing a user-friendly interface. Solutions that work in the real world must also be designed to effectively support the patient’s tasks and goals, while being engaging to use. In other words, they need to be built with patients, not for them.

This starts with truly understanding patients’ problems through in-depth research and analysis. It is important that any pharma-sponsored support programme aligns with strategic objectives but also rigorously meets real patient need and is differentiated from currently-available solutions. Building the value proposition should be done collaboratively, and through a process of co-creation. When patients truly partner with clinicians, academia, pharma and health technology experts, the results can be incredible.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Why Instagram Is the Worst Social Media for Mental Health

Why Instagram Is the Worst Social Media for Mental Health | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Instagram is the worst social media network for mental health and wellbeing, according to a recent survey of almost 1,500 teens and young adults. While the photo-based platform got points for self-expression and self-identity, it was also associated with high levels of anxiety, depression, bullying and FOMO, or the “fear of missing out.”

Out of five social networks included in the survey, YouTube received the highest marks for health and wellbeing and was the only site that received a net positive score by respondents. Twitter came in second, followed by Facebook and then Snapchat—with Instagram bringing up the rear.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Doctors Hub
Scoop.it!

Fitbit and Google Team Up on Digital Health Initiative

Fitbit and Google Team Up on Digital Health Initiative | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

The partnership between Fitbit and Google has the potential to revolutionize digital healthcare by enabling patients to link personal data with medical records.

Fitbit and Google are joining forces to change the way healthcare providers receive and process patient data. For Google, this is one of many initiatives that aims to make an impact in a growing industry that represents over $3 trillion in annual spending.

For Fitbit, this partnership is a natural extension of its device capabilities. The company is transitioning from counting steps and calories to offering professional medical insights based on users’ biometric data.

Now, Fitbit and Google will connect user data from wearable devices to the healthcare system. Using Google’s new Cloud Healthcare API, Fitbit wearers can link their personal data with their electronic medical records (EMR). This will allow doctors to access long-term, up-to-date information and focus on patients’ individual needs.

New Opportunities for Digital Healthcare


Via Philippe Marchal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Medical Twitter’s ShareAStoryInOneTweet hashtag is heartbreaking.

Medical Twitter’s ShareAStoryInOneTweet hashtag is heartbreaking. | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Doctors are just like everyone else: They’re on Twitter. For many of us, Twitter has become a global watercooler, where professionals come to discuss ideas and hot topics, just like any other subset of Twitter. Debates over new articles, medical education, and policy are common and—somewhat extraordinarily given the medium—often civilized and informative.

Like any other field, “Med Twitter” has its stars, and last summer, Esther Choo became an undisputed one. An emergency physician and health-policy researcher, Choo fired off a tweetstorm about her experiences with racism as a practicing Asian American in Oregon (in a moment of downtime while watching one of her kids—emergency docs are legendary multitaskers).

 

 


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Social media has become a public health issue - and it's killing us all

Social media has become a public health issue - and it's killing us all | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Do you know what will eventually do for social media?

The health issue: it’s killing us, mind and body. As I predicted that on Sky News the other day, it occurred to me that in a previous decade I would’ve said it with a cigarette on the go, the interviewer pausing to offer me a light. But just as health scares stopped smoking in public, so social media will eventually become a taboo, even a matter for state regulation. I for one will be very happy. I wish we could uninvent it all together.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

FDA moves to encourage A.I. in medicine, drug development

FDA moves to encourage A.I. in medicine, drug development | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

The Food and Drug Administration is making moves to encourage the use of artificial intelligence and other digital tools in medicine and drug development, expanding a program it announced last year around digital health and establishing a new incubator focused on health technology.

"AI holds enormous promise for the future of medicine," FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in prepared remarks for the Health Datapalooza conference Thursday in Washington. "We're actively developing a new regulatory framework to promote innovation in this space, and support the use of AI-based technologies."

The agency established its pre-certification program for digital health companies last year, enabling certain firms that obtain that status to bring digital health products to market through a more streamlined regulatory process. Gottlieb said the regulatory agency will look to apply that program to tools based on AI as well.

 

"We expect to see an increasing number of AI-based submissions in the coming years, starting with medical imaging devices, and we're working with experts in the field," Gottlieb said.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media in Pharma: Taming Word of Mouth

Social Media in Pharma: Taming Word of Mouth | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Whether pharmaceutical companies should leverage social media is not an issue anymore. Marketing practices in the field are evolving rapidly, and as electronic communication continues expanding, pharmaceutical professionals need a good understanding of social media’s effects on marketing more than ever before. Taking the right steps can make all the difference between a disappointing launchand a wild success story.

The question is how to strategically plan and execute social media campaigns. Both researchers and practitioners seek a better understanding of how online and offline word of mouth (WOM) operates in the context of the pharmaceutical industry.

 

Planning Ahead

 

Summarized below are some of the most pertinent and largely unresolved questions pharma communications professionals are eager to find the answer to:

When: When to enter social media? Are there pioneering advantages and/or follower advantages? During which stage of its life cycle should a product be promoted the most through social media marketing?

Where: Where should firms start a social media communications campaign? Blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, or across all social media channels? Should firms sponsor an existing community, or create their own?

Who: Who should firms target? Who are the opinion leaders and influencers? Should firms target loyal patients and heavy prescribers? How should they optimize sales force resource allocation so that it leverages the power of WOM?

What: What should the contents of social media campaigns be like? Should they be branded or unbranded? How should they leverage social media to mitigate the impact of crisis or negative events such as recalls and competitive launches? Should they take proactive actions to communicate with patients, physicians, and regulatory communities prior to a crisis outbreak?

How: How does word of mouth affect a drug and how does the effect change over a product’s life cycle? Which therapeutic category should be promoted, using which social media channel? Can a new media strategy that proved successful for one brand resonate with another brand’s target audience?

 

Word of Mouth

 

Understanding word of mouth is crucial to understanding the dynamics and effects of social media on the adoption of new products and its effective use in pharma communications.

In the pharmaceutical industry, word of mouth influence can emanate from different players such as patients, physicians, healthcare providers, insurers, regulatory authorities, the general public, and others. Studies on WOM and social influence within the professional field are limited, however, mainly because of the lack of adequate data to infer connections among key opinion leaders, physicians, patients and other stakeholders.

 

Measuring WOM

 

A simple yet powerful approach to measuring the so called word-of-mouth equity was proposed byMcKinsey&Co in 2010. Under their model, there are three main drivers of the impact of WOM messages: what is said, i.e. the message content, the identity of the person who communicates the message, and the environment where it circulates.

 


 

Source: McKinsey&Co (2010)

 

As evident from the figure above, the effect of WOM is also dependent on the message volume. One of the main pieces of research on online word of mouth (albeit not in the pharmaceutical industry), published in the Journal of Marketing in 2006, has shown that the volume of WOM rather than its valence is a significant predictor of box office revenues. Thus, tracking  share of voice on social media and its underlying sentiment is an important input into pharma communication strategies.

Furthermore, McKinsey found out that influentials typically generate three times more word of mouth messages than non-influentials do, and each message has four times more impact on a recipient’s purchasing decision.

The diffusion of influence on social networks is explained by the so called social contagion, which in the context of pharma is likely driven by social learning mitigating functional and physical risks. Research in this area carried out in 2011 among doctors in the US indicates that social contagion exists in new product adoption after controlling for marketing efforts and system-wide changes.

The primary driver of social contagion effects on new product adoption in pharma is opinion leadership. In this regard the structure of social networks matters more than their size: researchers at the University of Southern California recently uncovered a social media paradox called “the majority illusion,” demonstrating that you only need a handful of influencers to give the impression that everyone is talking about your brand.

Mapping key opinion leaders and the network ties between them through social network analysis, therefore, provides an innovative and scientific approach for pharma companies to effectively scale their communication efforts.

 

The Way Forward

 

In view of the challenges and questions outlined above, pharmaceutical companies can follow a six-step plan to integrate social media with their overall communications strategy.

Track the brand. This involves monitoring the brand in all forms of media, including social media.

Identify and communicate with opinion leaders (e.g., Six Until Me diabetes blog, Brass and Ivory blog). Pharmaceutical firms need to first identify opinion leaders among patients, physicians, healthcare providers, academics, regulatory authorities, the general public, etc., by monitoring relevant online media. Then they should provide timely and unbiased information relating to their brands to these opinion leaders.

Support social network(s) (e.g. WebMD, CureTogether, PatientsLikeMe). Pharmaceutical firms can be proactive by supporting relevant social networks of physicians and patients through content and financial sponsorship. However, they may need to weigh the pros and cons of explicitly advertising their sponsorship, since it could detract from the authenticity of the site and messages.

Hang out with opinion leaders in their networks (e.g. EyeSpaceMD for ophthalmologists, SpineConnect, MedTrust). In the relevant social networks, firms need to engage influencers by discussing pertinent issues and ideas.

Use video. Because the visual medium is powerful for memorability, firms should actively seek opportunities to use video. Posting, sharing, and distributing relevant information videos will enhance the authenticity of the brand.

Go mobile. Firms should use the rapidly growing mobile media segment to engage key opinion leaders first. Once they start engaging key opinion leaders, they can continually experiment to figure out the best way to do so. They can establish partnerships with mobile operators, applications providers, and other technology representatives. Because speed is of essence, firms are better served by forming relationships early and not waiting for the perfect partner.


Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Social Media for Hepatitis B Awareness: Young Adult and Community Leader Perspectives

Social Media for Hepatitis B Awareness: Young Adult and Community Leader Perspectives | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Screening for hepatitis B (HBV) among high-risk young adults can help prevent its transmission and lead to earlier treatment and better long-term health outcomes. Yet few interventions have focused on increasing HBV awareness among young adults. Social media (SM) may be an effective method for disseminating information and engaging young adults about HBV. In this pilot study, qualitative and quantitative methods were applied to collect information on current use and perceptions toward SM through semistructured interviews and focus groups with young Chinese and Vietnamese adults and community leaders from local organizations in Philadelphia. Additionally, survey items were collected during the interviews and focus groups to provide quantitative data. Results from the interviews provided evidence that young adults and local organizations are already using SM and are open to using it to share general health information that is specific to their community. The focus groups suggested that using group pages or chats could be most appropriate for reaching young adults and that credible sources should be used to deliver messages that are tailored to the audience. The findings from this study will support the development of an SM intervention aimed at increasing HBV awareness.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

The Effects of Digital Marketing of Unhealthy Commodities on Young People: A Systematic Review 

The Effects of Digital Marketing of Unhealthy Commodities on Young People: A Systematic Review  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
The marketing of unhealthy commodities through traditional media is known to impact consumers’ product attitudes and behaviors. Less is known about the impacts of digital marketing (online promotional activities), especially among young people who have a strong online presence. This review systematically assesses the relationship between digital marketing and young people’s attitudes and behaviors towards unhealthy commodities. Literature was identified in June 2017 by searches in six electronic databases. Primary studies (both qualitative and quantitative) that examined the effect of digital marketing of unhealthy food or beverages, alcohol and tobacco products on young people’s (12 to 30 years) attitudes, intended and actual consumption were reviewed. 28 relevant studies were identified. Significant detrimental effects of digital marketing on the intended use and actual consumption of unhealthy commodities were revealed in the majority of the included studies. Findings from the qualitative studies were summarized and these findings provided insights on how digital marketing exerts effects on young people. One of the key findings was that marketers used peer-to-peer transmission of messages on social networking sites (e.g., friends’ likes and comments on Facebook) to blur the boundary between marketing contents and online peer activities. Digital marketing of unhealthy commodities is associated with young people’s use and beliefs of these products. The effects of digital marketing varied between product types and peer endorsed marketing (earned media) may exert greater negative impacts than owned or paid media marketing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare – Do the Benefits Outweigh the Challenges?

Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare – Do the Benefits Outweigh the Challenges? | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

As healthcare professionals, it seems we can’t escape the buzz and hype of artificial intelligence (AI) today. However, unlike other industries, healthcare’s adoption of AI is still in its infancy, in part, due to many providers still updating their tools and processes for the digital age. According to anAccenture analysis, growth in the AI health market is expected to reach $6.6 billion by 2021 and key clinical health AI applications can potentially create $150 billion in annual savings for the US healthcare economy by 2026.

AI provides industry players with a unique opportunity to not only offer tools and insights that can vastly improve patient care, but that also improve their bottom line. However, despite all the benefits and advantages of AI that we hear about, some remain skeptical and hesitant to jump on board, and quite frankly, are concerned about the challenges ofAI in healthcare and just how much it will impact the industry.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

Surgical Outcomes and Social Media Reviews: When a 5-Star Rating Isn't All It Seems

Surgical Outcomes and Social Media Reviews: When a 5-Star Rating Isn't All It Seems | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

You arrive at high quality surgical outcomes the same way you arrive at Carnegie Hall: practice, practice, practice. It may not be the only — or even the most important — driver of superlative operative results, but it's fairly well established that people (and places) who do a lot of operations tend to have better outcomes than those who don't.1

The “why” of this isn't exactly a medical mystery: they've had more practice. With the steepest part of the learning curve firmly in the rear view, high-volume operative hubs are stacked with teams that are exceptionally prepared to outmaneuver the hazards that regularly trip up novices. An expert, as the saying goes, has already made all the mistakes that can be made in the field. Surgery is all about not making those mistakes twice. High-volume centers embrace that challenge, and their patient outcomes shine as a result. The patients, of course, are thrilled. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Giuseppe Fattori
Scoop.it!

The Anatomy of a Tweet: Social Media in Surgical Practice

The Anatomy of a Tweet: Social Media in Surgical Practice | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Adham Elmously, MD, Arash Salemi, MD, and T. Sloane Guy,MD

 

The use of social media by surgeons is not only encouraged, but should be seen as an obligation to patients and colleagues to help disseminate impor-tant information. In a rapidly expanding digital revolution, engagement in social media allows surgeons to network with the community and leverage content to a wide audience while owning their online presence.

 

It has been over a decade since the conception of social media, and despite its nearly ubiquitous use in modern life, many phy-sicians have opted out of participating in this platform. The main barriers to social media use for physicians seem to be lack of time, lack of perceived value, as well as concerns about personal and patient privacy.1 Currently, Facebook has over 1 billion active users and Twitter has over 300 million active users, with studies demonstrating that 84% of adults use the Internet and spend an average of 6 hours per week on social media,2,3 figures that are rising each year (Fig. 1). In fact, the use of social media by all age groups is increasing with time, and this includes patients over the age of 65, a group that is an important part of cardiothoracic practice (Fig. 2).2 Although these numbers may seem surprising, it is important for us as phy-sicians to understand the importance of participating in this revolution. That being said, up to 35% of patients look to the In-ternet or social networking sites to obtain health-care information.4 In line with this, physician grading websites such as Healthgrades, Zocdoc, and RateMD that pervasively attempt to evaluate and score us are an ever-present reminder of the extensive online presence that we have as physicians. So, if you are under the impression that you are not a social media user, you are probably mistaken—you are simply not owning your online presence. Type your name into Google; regardless of your academic success or stature, not only will you find links touting your accomplishments, but you will also find evidence of unverified commentary and ratings. These websites regularly have as little as a handful of reviews—which naturally select out unhappy patients or may even constitute acts of sabotage from competing providers.5 If it is not in the interest of the physician to engage in social media for their own benefit, it is important to participate for their pa-tients and for their specialty. With the rapid and instantaneous dissemination of information that is provided by these platforms, physicians can take part in disease-specific-social media—creating awareness, communicating directly with patients, participating in podcasts and debunking misinformation.6 So, the question for surgeons is not whether to use social media, but how to use social media. SOCIAL NETWORKING IN VENUES OF RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND PATIENT ENGAGEMENT Engagement in social media in this era should not be consid-ered an addition to our workflow, but a part of our job. One of the fundamental advantages of social media is that it allows us to engage with learners, patients, and peers in an asynchronous fashion—without being limited by geography or resources.7-10 Twitter and Facebook have become indispensable tools that allow us to reach a much wider audience and bring shared interactions to every aspect of our practice. Physician utilization of Twitter has slowly grown11,12; however, for context, whereas the American Associa-tion for Thoracic Surgery (@AATSHQ) currently has 2835 followers on Twitter, Justin Bieber has 103,301,694, so there remains room for growth. Launched in 2006, Twitter is considered a “micro-blog”; although it limits users to only 140 characters per post (tweet), thus limiting context, it has provided the most precise and dynamic information exchange via social media in health care.13 Tweets can also include “hashtags,” a form of information indexing that allows users to search for tweets regarding specific topics. Tweets can also be shared or “re-tweeted,” which means that with the appropri-ate network, a carefully assembled tweet has the potential to have an immense downstream effect. Twitter has allowed a multifaceted line of communication with our peers and patients. For many Twitter users, health care “tweetchats” have allowed participation in the platform. A tweetchat is a prearranged Twitter discussion moderated by a host through the aid of a hashtag. The #hcsm (health care communications and social media) tweetchat emerged in January 2009 as the first regular tweetchat related to health care.14 Since then, patient-centered tweetchats have also emerged, with #lcsm (lung cancer social media), led by surgeon David Tom Cook (@DavidCookeMD), producing an explosion in the number of patients and doctors discussing lung cancer online. With the growing use of health-care-related hashtags such as #lungcancer and #colonoscopy, not only are we provid-ing patients with education and support, but it is reasonable to think that there will also be an associated increase in patient screen-ing and awareness of diseases like lung cancer and colon cancer, which may manifest as a survival benefit, an area of research that will be interesting to explore. Further evidence that social media is transforming patient-physician commination is the development of novel mobile health apps made for patients to track and iden-tify nascent complications and prevent hospital readmission, currently in feasibility stages.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from PATIENT EMPOWERMENT & E-PATIENT
Scoop.it!

Guidebook for Patient Access to Health Information  -#esante #digitalhealth #hcsmeu

Guidebook for Patient Access to Health Information  -#esante #digitalhealth #hcsmeu | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

April 04, 2018 - HHS and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) has issued a new guidebook to assist patient access to health information. This playbook comes as a part of the HHS and CMS MyHealthEData initiative.

The ONC Guide to Getting and Using Your Health Records is an online and patient-facing document helping patients overcome the challenges they face in accessing their medical records. The guide reviews obtaining a patient health record, checking the health record for accuracy and completeness, and using health records and data sharing for better patient engagement.

This guidebook, in conjunction with the MyHealthEData initiative announced last month, supports HHS’s goals for better patient engagement. Patients become more activated in their own care and are empowered to make healthcare decisions when they can obtain access to their own medical records.

MyHealthEData and patient access to health data also aligns with the 21st Century Cures Act. Patient access to their own medical records is a measure of interoperability, HHS and ONC contend, as is the ability for a patient to send her own medical data to another healthcare provider.

“It’s important that patients and their caregivers have access to their own health information so they can make decisions about their care and treatments,” ONC head Don Rucker, MD, said in a statement. “This guide will help answer some of the questions that patients may have when asking for their health information.


Via VAB Traductions, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
more...
No comment yet.