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Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Italian Social Marketing Network - Newsletter 159
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Dalle App di servizio alle App di relazione: come cambia il rapporto medico-paziente. G.Fattori-N.Pinelli-S.Marcotullio

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Google's AI system can grade prostate cancer cells with 70% accuracy

Google's AI system can grade prostate cancer cells with 70% accuracy | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Google researchers have developed an AI system that can grade prostate cancer cells on the Gleason system with 70 percent accuray.

The goal, according to technical lead Martin Stumpe and Google AI Healthcare product manager Craig Mermel, was to develop AI that could perform Gleason grading objectively — and precisely. Human pathologists disagree on grades by as much as 53 percent, studies show.

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Health and fitness app usage “grew 330% in just 3 years” 

Health and fitness app usage “grew 330% in just 3 years”  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Health and fitness apps have become widely popular over the past few years, with usage growing by over 330% in the last three years, according to new research. The data, from Flurry Analytics, also shows that engagement is high, with three quarters of active users opening their health and fitness app at least two times ... [Read more...]

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Breast Cancer Patients Use Twitter as a Non-Medical Forum to Share their Experiences 

Breast Cancer Patients Use Twitter as a Non-Medical Forum to Share their Experiences  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Twitter is a place where many cancer patients go to share and discuss their experiences of the disease. This is the main finding of a recent exploratory study, to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, which analysed the contents of over 6,000 tweets and retweets about breast cancer.

Social media today have become an echo chamber in which every societal issue is reverberated many times over - including cancer. Study author Dr. Rodrigo Sanchez-Bayona of Clinica Universidad de Navarra in Pamplona, Spain, said: "Many of the patients we see in daily practice use social media to search for information about their disease, so, as care providers, we wanted to know what kind of content they find there. At the same time, the sheer volume of posts on Twitter represents a rich pool of data we can use to assess attitudes and discourses surrounding cancer."

For this analysis, all tweets posted with the hashtag #BreastCancer over a seven-day period were collected and categorised according to their content, aim, user information and whether they displayed a stigmatising attitude towards breast cancer. The tweets were also grouped into four subthemes: diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention. "This study was part of a larger, multidisciplinary project to observe the presence of different diseases on social media. In 2014, we found that cancer was the most mentioned pathology on Twitter globally. We decided to look more closely at breast cancer first, because it is one of the three most common tumours worldwide and the primary cause of cancer deaths in women."

The data collected included 3,703 original tweets and 2,638 retweets. "When examining the original tweets, we found that only one in three had medical content," said Sanchez-Bayona. "However, 90% of this medical information was appropriate, which is likely owed to the fact that 40% of tweets came from institutions and public accounts." The categorisation of tweets by aim showed that the most frequent motive was patients sharing their experiences, followed closely by patient advocacy. The most common subtheme by far was prevention (44.5% of tweets).

Out of the 2,559 non-medical tweets analysed, less than 15% contained stigmatising statements about the disease. "The numerous breast cancer awareness campaigns over the years have certainly contributed to reducing the stigma associated with this illness," said Sanchez-Bayona. "For many other tumours, there is still an unmet need. Going forward we would also like to explore and compare the social media presence of different tumours types."

"Although it would be interesting to do further research into the profiles of social media users who are the most active in the discussion about cancer, these initial findings may prove useful in themselves," he continued. "In particular, advocacy organisations can draw on them to create relevant medical content and counselling about cancer that will be more accessible to users. Social media can be used as a new way of providing information on cancer prevention and health education - not just to patients, but to a much broader audience."

Dr. Marina Garassino of Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori in Milan, Italy, commented for ESMO: "Twitter is a high-level platform that is much more credible than other social networks like Facebook, so I was not surprised to see that the majority of the news published there are accurate," she said. "This analysis also illustrates the presence of patients in large numbers on Twitter. We should take that as corroboration of a new reality: patients now use the web to find information, and social media must be an integral part of our communication with them. Academic institutions and key opinion leaders need to be even more active in spreading their findings through these channels to counteract the many 'fake news' circulating online."

Dr. Evandro de Azambuja, ESMO Executive Board member, further commented: "I agree that the volume of reliable medical content published on Twitter should increase. Healthcare professionals and organisations really need to use appropriate social media as a way of sharing relevant information - both between them and with patients - because that is where it has the potential to be picked up fastest and most broadly."

"Personally, I check Twitter daily for announcements of the latest publications of leading academic journals and fellow oncologists. I can then go and read the articles I'm interested in, knowing exactly where to find them. It's an efficient way of obtaining medical information as it is published," de Azambuja added. "When it comes to bringing the best evidence available in cancer research to the attention of as many people as possible, this platform is as powerful a tool as it gets."

Abstract 360P_PR 'Breast cancer in Twitter: A real-world data exploratory study' will be presented by Rodrigo Sanchez-Bayona during Poster Display Session on Monday, 22 October 2018, 12:45-13:45 (CEST) in the Poster Area Networking Hub - Hall A3. Annals of Oncology, Volume 29 Supplement 8 October 2018

 

 

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Stanford says over 400k people joined Apple Watch Heart Study

Stanford says over 400k people joined Apple Watch Heart Study | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Back in August, Stanford and Apple announced they were closing their joint Heart Study program to new participants. Now, Stanford Medicine has outlined additional details about the future of the program in a blog post.

 According to Stanford Medicine, the Apple Watch Heart Study attracted over 400,000 participants. Currently, Stanford says the study has entered the “final phase of data collection” with full completion expected in early 2019.

Lloyd Minor, dean of the Stanford School of Medicine, said that he hopes the study results in better detail on how wearables like Apple Watch can be used for informing precision health:

“We hope this study will help us better understand how wearable technologies can inform precision health,” said Lloyd Minor, MD, dean of the School of Medicine. “These new tools, which have the potential to predict, prevent, and mange disease, are finally within our reach.”

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Accenture and Merck partner with Amazon Web Services to launch a new platform to promote innovation | Pharmaceutical | Healthcare Global

Accenture and Merck partner with Amazon Web Services to launch a new platform to promote innovation | Pharmaceutical | Healthcare Global | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Accenture and Merck have sought to collaborate with Amazon Web Services (AWS) in the development of a cloud-based informatics research platform designed to help organisations in the life sciences industry improve productivity, efficiency and innovation in the early stages of drug development.

The platform will enable an ecosystem that accelerates innovation by creating open, industry-standard application programming interfaces for core research functions, allowing researchers to rapidly adopt new capabilities. Scientific application providers, content providers and technology innovators will benefit from lower barriers to entry as they bring new capabilities to market, helping life sciences companies re-imagine processes, user experiences, and approaches to data-intensive research.

 

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Bose self-fitting hearing aid gets FDA approval

Bose self-fitting hearing aid gets FDA approval | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Dive Brief:

  • FDA on Friday authorized the first self-fitting hearing aid that can be programmed without the help of a healthcare provider.
  • The Bose Hearing Aid uses what is called wireless air conduction technology that captures sound vibrations through a microphone. The signal is processed, amplified and played back through an earphone in the ear canal. Patients can adjust the sound through a mobile phone application.
  • In its statement announcing approval of the device, FDA said it is working to draft regulations for a new category of over-the-counter hearing aids in compliance with the FDA Reauthorization Act (FDARA) of 2017. The agency cleared the Bose Hearing Aid through its De Novo premarket review pathway for new low- to moderate-risk devices.

Dive Insight:

About 15% of U.S. adults, or 37.5 million people, have some degree of hearing loss. However, an estimated 86% of people who would benefit from hearing aids do not get them, primarily because of cost, according to the Hearing Loss Association of America. Medicare and most private insurers do not cover the devices. 

To help make hearing aids more affordable and accessible, Congress incorporated the Over-the-Counter Hearing Aid Act into the FDARA in 2017. Sponsored by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., the legislation allowing people to buy hearing aids without a doctor’s prescription garnered strong bipartisan support. FDA is required to publish proposed regulations for the new category of hearing aids by Aug. 18, 2020.

This July, FDA sent a letter to manufacturers cautioning them against characterizing their devices as over-the-counter hearing aids and reminding them that the OTC category does not exist yet. Hearing aids also differ from personal sound amplification products on the market that are intended for those with normal hearing.  

Approval of the Bose Hearing Aid gives users "direct control over the fit and functionality of the device," said Malvina Eydelman, director of the Division of Ophthalmic, and Ear, Nose and Throat Devices at FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. "The FDA is committed to ensuring that individuals with hearing loss have options for taking an active role in their health care," Eydelman said in a press release.

FDA reviewed data from clinical studies involving 125 patients that showed self-fitting of the Bose Hearing Aid was comparable to professional fitting for the amount of amplification selected, speech in noise testing and overall benefit. Patients also preferred the hearing aid settings they selected themselves over those chosen by a healthcare professional, FDA said. The Bose device includes labeling that informs consumers when to consult a doctor.

The device still must comply with state laws that require hearing aids to be purchased from a licensed hearing aid dispenser, FDA said. However a FDARA provision stating that no state or local law can be different from the regulations FDA establishes to govern over-the-counter hearing aids will take effect when the agency's final rule on the devices is published.

 

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Social Media Research Guidance; using social media for social research

Social Media Research Guidance; using social media for social research | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

This introductory guidance aims to raise awareness and explore the potential of social media research. It is primarily aimed at government social researchers and analysts, but will also be of interest to policy-makers and researchers working outside of government.

The guidance discusses how social media data has a range of attributes which are not found in ‘offline’ data and how as such, new approaches and techniques are required. It covers an introduction to social media, use of social media in government, social media as a research tool and ethical considerations. The document also provides a number of working-level resources which it is hoped will guide researchers unfamiliar with the topic through their first social media research projects.

As of March 2018 we have added to the initial guidance, to include a resource which highlights key ethical and quality assurance considerations which those conducting social media research might encounter. The resource also includes descriptions of these considerations, to support those commissioning or planning projects using this data. It also includes a grid showing the relationship between these new ethical consideration and the Government Social Research ethical principles for conducting research, to highlight where traditional approaches can be taken to handling these considerations, and where new approaches may have to be developed.

 

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Etude : quelles sont les marques préférées des millennials ?

Etude : quelles sont les marques préférées des millennials ? | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Une étude BrandIndex YouGov dévoile les marques dont les millennials disent le plus de bien. Et surprise, au milieu des GAFA et des réseaux sociaux américains s’est glissée une marque française. Le Doliprane devance Instagram, McDonald’s et même l’iPhone. La marque d’antalgiques se classe donc en cinquième position. Entre poster des photos retouchées pour donner l’impression d’avoir une vie de rêve et soigner son mal de tête après une grosse soirée, les millennials français ont fait leur choix.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Les stratégies digitales des pharmacies en ligne

Les stratégies digitales des pharmacies en ligne | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Stratégies digitales des pharmacies en ligne : Comment les pharmacies online communiquent pour faire face à la réglementation ? | Le Journal du Community Manager c'est l'actualité Community Management | Social Media | Marketing

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Social Media and Physician Conflict of Interest |

Social Media and Physician Conflict of Interest | | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

The use of social media by physicians has increased substantially in recent years, with some estimates reporting increases from 41.6% in 2010 to as high as 90% in 2011.1 While personal use is more common, approximately 65% of physicians interact with various social media platforms for professional reasons.1 For example, some physicians use social media to promote positive health behaviors, debate health care policy, network with colleagues, and to educate their patients, peers, and students.

As such, there is great potential for physician use of social media to improve health outcomes. However, protection of patient and physician privacy, distribution of inaccurate health care information, violation of personal–professional boundaries, misrepresentation of credentials, and bias in physicians’ recommendations on social media remain significant concerns. Recognizing this, in 2010, the American Medical Association and, in 2013, the American College of Physicians (ACP) and the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) published guidelines for the ethical use of social media by physicians.23 The ACP/FSMB policy statement advises that physicians must disclose any potential conflicts of interest (COI) when discussing their professional experiences online. These recommendations were (and to our knowledge remain) innovative; we are not aware of similar recommendations applying to other professional groups using social media (eg, lawyers and scientists). Despite this recommendation, data suggest that lack of disclosure by physicians continues to be a significant problem. In this commentary, we examine the challenges of disclosure on social media and propose potential solutions.

The Importance of Disclosure

Industry relationships may explicitly or implicitly bias physicians in their reporting of research study results and in their declared medical management recommendations. Such conflicts may create risks for individual patients and can also undermine the integrity of the doctor–patient relationship. Disclosure of potential COI ensures such influences can at least be acknowledged and incorporated into the interpretation of online information. Physicians are already required to disclose potential COI during conference presentations, on submissions to medical journals, and to their employing institutions (eg, academic medical centers). While some may argue that disclosure can lead to misguided trust in the discloser,4 in general, disclosure serves to 1) caution readers, and 2) serve as a deterrent from engaging in these relationships when unethical.

Current Status in Social Media

Are physicians following the ACP/FSMB policy recommendation on disclosure, and should consumers of social media be concerned about potential COI amongst physicians distributing health care information on these platforms? Available studies raise concerns.

Data about physicians’ failure to disclose potential conflicts online predate the 2013 ACP/FSMB policy statement. In a 2012 survey of osteopathic and medicine boards in the United States, 92% indicated that at least one online professionalism violation had been reported to their board, and approximately 20% of these violations related to failure to disclose COI online.5

Data in the wake of the ACP/FSMB recommendations suggest that the current state of disclosure online is no better. In a study of US hematology-oncology specialists using Twitter, 79.5% had at least one financial COI.6 In a subsequent study, researchers analyzed the contents of the tweets of 156 hematology-oncology physicians with a financial COI of at least $1000 in general payments in 2014.7 Eighty-one percent of physicians mentioned at least one drug from a company for which they had a COI.7 Comparing 100 tweets about potentially conflicted drugs with 100 tweets about nonconflicted drugs at random, conflicted tweets were more likely to be positive, similarly likely to be neutral, and less likely to be negative.7 Of utmost concern, only 1.3% of these physicians included disclosures of their payments.7 Whether such potential biases exist among other specialties warrants further study.

To read this article in its entirety please visit our website.


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5 strategies for improving health literacy with digital signage 

5 strategies for improving health literacy with digital signage  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Let’s tackle health literacy once and for all and move our health care system forward. Let’s remove complex and hard-to-understand messaging in all forms of communication. Let’s use innovative technology such as digital signage in hospitals to consistently engage patients and employees at the point of care.

Tell people what they need to do and where to get help and watch them take action. When you are clear and direct you help people assimilate, absorb, and retain information. You are empowering them to them to change their thoughts and behaviors, ultimately increasing the trust between patient and provider.

Improve health literacy and optimize digital signage communications with these five strategies:

 

Use plain language to explain “how” to do things and “why” they should be done.

Breaking down barriers to communication can help prevent avoidable hospital readmissions. Patients who know and understand a physician’s instructions will feel empowered to act in their own best interest. Demonstrating how to properly take medication, explaining why not refilling a prescription can have severe consequences, and why following a physician’s discharge instructions is critical to recovery are examples of messaging that can help support physician communication.

Help alleviate anxiety and reduce confusion with universal symbols.

Easily recognized symbols included in patient education messaging can help increase understanding as people capture meanings at a glance. Combined with compassionate and supportive messaging, symbols can help calm anxious patients and caregivers.

Provide easy-to-remember numbers and web addresses so people can act upon information in real time.

Call-to-action information in large eye-catching fonts and visually appealing designs can grab attention and encourage people to make physician and screening appointments on their cell phones while they wait. Tell caregivers to get prescriptions filled at on-site pharmacies while their loved ones are being discharged and show them exactly where to go. Provide discounts and coupons for nutritious meals in the hospital cafeteria.

Reinforce “teach back” opportunities with clinical staff to elevate quality care.

Ensuring seamless communication is an important component of delivering quality care and “teach back” is a proven means of increasing patient understanding. Offering helpful tips, reminders, and support on monitors in nursing stations and employee break rooms can go a long ways to moving health literacy forward.

Clarify insurance terms and connect people to the right coverage.

Studies have shown that not understanding basic insurance terminology makes it difficult for people to select the right coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Help people become more “insurance literate” when you shed light on terms like premiums, deductibles, and coinsurance. As you expand the types of messages delivered, your community will see you as a more comprehensive health resource.

We can’t ignore each opportunity to establish thoughtful, effective communication with patients, employees, and the communities we serve. Our messages must encourage a flow of conversation that is seamless and time-efficient. Health literacy needs to be addressed on many levels and digital signage, at the point of care, is a platform that can go a long ways towards breaking down the walls of confusing medical jargon and ineffective communication.


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Bullshit Metrics: Is Patient Engagement Real?

Bullshit Metrics: Is Patient Engagement Real? | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Whether it’s stock trading with a few clicks on a smartphone, streaming new music before the vinyl hit the shelves, or receiving a wardrobe from a personal stylist without ever stepping into a store, technology’s potential to revolutionize the consumer experience is ubiquitous across industries. The healthcare sphere is no exception to this, and in recent years a rash of digital health tools and connected devices have flooded the marketplace, promising cheaper care and better outcomes, all while personalizing the consumer experience.

The rallying cry of this digital boom in healthcare is “patient engagement.” Touted as the “blockbuster drug” of the new century, the term is slapped on every emerging product in the digital health market. The lure of such a label is patent in the consumer-centric economy, and the metrics seem to support its success.

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Alexa, Should We Trust You? Is Alexa Dangerous?

Alexa, Should We Trust You? Is Alexa Dangerous? | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
The voice revolution has only just begun. Today, Alexa is a humble servant. Very soon, she could be much more—a teacher, a therapist, a confidant, an informant.
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Addressing Health-Related Misinformation on Social Media - JAMA 

Addressing Health-Related Misinformation on Social Media - JAMA  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
This Viewpoint discusses strategies for debunking health misinformation on social media and ideas for ways to spread accurate health information.

The ubiquitous social media landscape has created an information ecosystem populated by a cacophony of opinion, true and false information, and an unprecedented quantity of data on many topics. Policy makers and the social media industry grapple with the challenge of curbing fake news, disinformation, and hate speech; and the field of medicine is similarly confronted with the spread of false, inaccurate, or incomplete health information

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One doctor’s social media mission to discuss vaccination with parents  

One doctor’s social media mission to discuss vaccination with parents   | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

As Romania fights a measles epidemic, Dr Mihai Craiu is using Facebook to turn the tide. His work has earned him a huge following – and 1st place in the 2018 Vaccines Today Communication Challenge’

In January 2017, Dr Mihai Craiu, a paediatrician in Bucharest, received some basic training in social media. It gave him the skills and confidence to do something he felt was sorely needed: join the online vaccine conversation to help parents understand the need for immunisation.

Romania has recorded thousands of measles cases this year and many blame the spread of misinformation online for declining vaccine uptake. 

‘Parents are using virtual media a lot – current data reveal that 74% of Romanians with a smartphone or desktop computer are going online first if they experience a health issue,’ Dr Craiu said.

‘I was concerned by the extremely low number of pro-immunization voices online. If anybody was searching online for information [in Romania] about a vaccine-related topic in 2016 or 2017 the first page they would find was full of anti-vaccination opinion. I realised that a Facebook page can reach more people than I could see in our clinic.’


That was the inspiration for his Facebook page (Spitalul Virtual de Copii) – a hub of information and a forum for conversations about vaccines and other child health topics. More than 100,000 people now follow the page and some of Dr Craiu’s videos have been viewed half a million times.

‘I spent at least three to four hours per day, but it has been a huge real-life experience,’ he said. The main challenge is responding to questions from parents – many of whom Dr Craiu believes decide to vaccinate their children after having their concerns addressed.

He said he has learned a great deal through using social media and has been sharing his experience with paediatricians, GPs and other health professionals – most recently at the 3rd Balkan Paediatric Meeting. 

Dr Craiu won first prize in this year’s Vaccines Today Communication Challenge. The contest set out to find Europe’s vaccine champions – those who actively advocate vaccination. He will present his work at the Excellent in Paediatrics conference in Prague at a roundtable event hosted by the Coalition for Life-Course Immunisation.

 

Read a full transcript of the interview below

What is the situation today in Romania regarding vaccine uptake? 

Unfortunately, it is slowly but constantly decreasing since 2010. According to the National Institute for Public Health (CNSCBT) we are now below the herd-immunity cut-off. The latest annual report shows a constant downward trend for measles-mumps-rubella vaccine uptake. Only 74.5% of children have had two doses of vaccine. So, the current epidemic could have been prevented because there have been serious warnings since May 2016.
Using three doses of DTP as a surrogate-marker for immunization, we also see a decrease, according to UNICEF data which puts the current level at 84% nationally. However, in some counties in Romania, it is as low as 50%. 

Is there widespread public concern about measles cases?

Yes, there has been constant coverage by media and official weekly reports from the CNSCBT on total number of confirmed cases and number of deaths. But the loudest voices are those of the anti-vaccine movement claiming that these numbers are incorrect and over-report measles cases and deaths.

Are you concerned by the level of anti-vaccine commentary in the media and online?

Yes, I am concerned because these rumours have grown into a structured movement with political implications. Clergy members, religious groups, artists and lawyers are joining forces.

There is a broad group of parliament members (more than 80 people) that have been able to block the Immunization Law. The Health Ministry appointed a group of experts two years ago when the first cases of measles were confirmed. I was appointed as a paediatrician, but there have been GPs, microbiologists, infectious diseases experts, epidemiologists, lawyers, and specialist representing the child-protection authorities among others.

The Immunization Law was evaluated by Health Ministry experts and then presented for a public debate. I was terrified by the verbal violence of opponents. Finally, after six hours of parallel dialogues, no basic consensus could be reached. The Senate had a relative short debate on this project and generated a positive vote. But the lower chamber of Parliament has the deciding vote. For more than a year there has been no progress.

Where does that leave the public debate?

Today there are no consequences for providing any fake-news regarding immunisation in Romania. The anti-vaccine people went so far as to distribute flyers by mail with UNICEF,WHO and Health Ministry logos stating that vaccines are harming children and are producing the measles epidemic. Dr Pintea, our Health Minister, has said that legal prosecution will follow. 

Do you also hear these concerns from parents in your clinic? How do you respond?

Parents are extremely vocal in social media, both pro and against vaccination. In the clinic most of the people that approach physicians are hesitant people. Some of them are not opponents of all vaccines. MMR uptake is still affected by the bad Wakefield story and we are still debating with many parents on autism causality issues. There are also a large group of parents who are hesitant because their GP is hesitant.

With my colleagues from the National GP Society we produced short online cases or scenarios related to vaccine-preventable diseases. We also posted, on the Society portal, a structured catch-up schedule for those children whose parents can be convinced. This portal is open also for lay people.

When did you begin using Facebook to communicate about paediatrics and vaccination?

More than four years ago we started to provide online education for parents of children with asthma through our Institute’s online portal. The Virtual Asthma Hospital has proven that people are reading these posts. And children that were instructed to use this portal were less likely to have unscheduled medical visits to the Emergency Department. We were able to present a paper at an international conference on the Virtual Asthma Hospital impact on quality of life.

Parents are using virtual media a lot. Current data reveal that 74% of Romanians with a smartphone or PC are going online first if they experience a health issue. Only 26% are asking their GP. So, I realised that a Facebook page can reach more people than I could see in our clinic.

I attended a training session in Bruxelles in January 2017. I was concerned by the extremely low number of pro-immunization voices online. If anybody was searching online for information about a vaccine-related topic in 2016 or 2017 the first page they would find was full of anti-vaccination opinion.  

There are some isolated voices of physicians like Irina Costache, mother of two and paediatrician. Her blog, Mamica Pediatru, is a nice and positive voice. Prof Maria Livia Ognean, neonatologist and one of the most active physicians on-line, has a page called Baby Care Sibiu. And Dr Otilia Tiganas, a GP in a small rural area of western part of Romania writes a blog with a simple and sometimes humorous approach to medial issues – Blogul Otiliei.

Has your social media work been a success? 

I think so – last year at the COPAC Gala my Facebook page (Spitalul Virtual de Copii) was awarded a special prize in a communication contest. It was the first time that a paediatric pro-immunization page was nominated for such a competition in Romania.

More than 97,000 people are reading this page and a lot of children have been immunized after their parents had an online pro-con debate on this page. Positive open dialogues on vaccine related-issues are common on my page. It is not entirely dedicated to vaccines but covers a rather large area of childhood diseases or health-related issues like growth and development, emergencies, diet etc.

Have you had any negative experiences?

Yes, several. But during my 20 months experience I found the right approach – I hope! Some unexpected negative experiences were related to other physicians that were not very happy – unfortunately we have some doctors in Romania that are organizing, along with religious groups or notorious anti-vaccine champions, public events where fake science is promoted.

How do you respond to anti-vaccine comments on Facebook?

If they are aggressive or deliberating misleading I warn them in a polite manner. Some fake-news are useful because I can answer in a scientific way and I am able to provide data and documentation sources for hesitant parents. A lot of hesitant people sent me private messages seeking guidance or even asking me to immunize their child.

Some vulgar or aberrant posts are deleted. But more than 90% of my Facebook followers are rather polite.

Would you encourage other health professionals to use social media in this way? 

Yes, I have presented my work at several local or regional meetings. This month I was an invited speaker at the 3rd Balkan Paediatric Meeting where I presented my online activities. Next month I will attend a national joint meeting of paediatricians, GPs and media people and I will present also a SWOT analysis of my Facebook page.

What skills or training do you need, if any?

I need better skills for video editing – short videos are the most commented posts on my Facebook page. One of them had more than 500,000 views. 

A lot of trouble-shooting issues are also needed – how to respond to a special type of approach? Tailored "treatment" in a rising rather aggressive Romanian Social Media environment is needed.

Does it take a lot of your time? 

Yes. At least 3-4 hours a day. But it has been a huge real-life experience. During a one-to-one dialogue in hospital I am rather protected. I am in a comfortable position of being a senior physician and patients are rather compliant. But online I have met the real patients. There are no limited on sincere and uncensored dialogue.

One parent has said: "If I am not in the GP’s office I can ask about my fears or dilemmas. You are listening. Or at least you cannot interrupt my questions…".

Do you believe your social media work is having an impact on public attitudes? 

Yes. Or I hope so! Many of my residents and students in medical school have changed. And our hospital is now the leading paediatric hospital in parental perspective. Because dialogue style changed. 

The future is now. Social media tools will impact more and more medical issues – not only vaccination. 


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The Med in Social Media: The Role Twitter Can Play in the Medical Student Toolkit

The Med in Social Media: The Role Twitter Can Play in the Medical Student Toolkit | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Medical school is a melting pot of passions and intellect. Therefore, I was surprised when it was here that I felt, for the first time, alone in my interests. I had fallen in love with the idea of using social media as a health care tool for both patients and providers. However, this concept is still in its infancy. With colleagues dedicated to so many different projects, it was difficult to convince them to join a movement that is still finding its place in medicine. Additionally, many of us are wary of putting our professional reputations at risk before they even have a chance to form. Statements made on social media in the heat of the moment can come back years later in haunting ways. A poorly thought out or timed tweet can become viral in minutes.

While I found this discouraging, the very platform I was trying to promote provided me with relief. On Twitter, I could find the conversations I craved with a simple #hashtag filter. Even when I didn’t know what I was looking for, I asked questions, and a simple like reminded me that I was not alone in my questioning. I followed mentors I admired, shaping my newsfeed into a flow of articles I cared about. Through them I learned of other hashtags and “mentors” I could follow. The quotations only indicate that most of these mentors probably are unaware of how they are influencing my personal career decisions and growth.

I happily grew into my lurker position and reached out of it occasionally. I learned about conference hashtags and was instantaneously given highlights from sessions occurring across the nation. It was easy asking clarification questions on Twitter knowing that people could respond in their own time. I enjoyed the false sense of security an online platform gives sometimes shy people like me. A few months ago, I participated in a tweetchat: #hcsm (healthcare social media). The interactions inspired me to break out of my comfort zone and directly message social media guru @DanamLewis, who founded the open source artificial pancreas system movement #OpenAPS. She agreed to speak for our Healthcare Innovations and Technology Student Interest Group, which is devoted to sharing news about improved patient care through the use of technology. It was the most attended event all year.

I currently hover in my personal bubble as a medical student on Twitter. I turn to it for information from trusted sources and am often pleasantly surprised by the interactions I have. While I tend to overthink social interactions with those above me on the medical hierarchy, the constant flow of tweets coming in from around the world allows me to let go of the expectations that I should get a response. Additionally, there is no obligation to post. I can use Twitter for as much or as little as I want, and it has been this versatility in usage that has convinced me of its invaluableness as a tool for the modern medical student.

I wrote this post with the guidance of both mentors and “mentors.” I look forward to the day when all medical students feel comfortable enough to add Twitter to their medical school toolkit. For all those who agree or disagree, I am putting out a call to action. A few peers and I who turn to social media for different reasons are coming together to formulate Twitter Guidelines, written by and for medical students. Guidelines for using Twitter as a medical educator, for example, already exist. If you have any experiences that would help us in our efforts, we would love to hear from you. You can email us at medstudsforsocialmedia@gmail.com or find me on Twitter @lamvivianw!


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Amazon secures a patent to further utilise Alexa to support patients 

Amazon secures a patent to further utilise Alexa to support patients  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Amazon’s decision to acquire pharmaceutical start-up PillPack came as no surprise to many, but dramatically led pharmaceutical companies to plunge in the stock market in **. Known to transform traditional industries, healthcare will be Amazon’s next big challenge, yet the company will face a multitude of complex hurdles.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Why Apple, Google, Amazon hired cardiologists

Why Apple, Google, Amazon hired cardiologists | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
  • The world's largest technology companies have all hired well-known cardiologists.
  • Heart disease and high blood pressure affect a large number of people, are well-understood, and there's evidence that consumer products can help.

 

Big Silicon Valley companies have often competed for talent with specialized skills, like expertise in artificial intelligence or trendy new programming languages.

 

Now they're competing for heart doctors.

 

Apple, Alphabet, and Amazon have all hired well-known cardiologists.

 

This might just be a coincidence. Cardiologists tend to be well educated and hard working, and big tech companies have a track record of recruiting such people.

 

In recent years, all of these companies have started to invest in products and devices that are targeted to millions of people who could benefit by tracking their heart health.

 

Apple's smartwatch now includes an electrocardiogram, which can detect heart rhythm irregularities. Verily's study watch, which is designed for clinical trial research, also tracks heart rate and heart rhythm, and it's doing a lot of work in chronic disease management. 

 

So the more likely explanation is that tech companies are interested in health care, and they have all come to the conclusion that cardiology should be an early (if not initial) target.

 

Here's why.

 

 

It's a huge potential market

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer in the world, and strokes are among the leading causes of death.

 

And that's not all that cardiologists treat. "Our scope covers other common disease such as high blood pressure, which impacts about a third of people in the U.S. — 75 million Americans — as well as lipid and cholesterol disorders," said Dr. Mo Elshazly, a cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine.

 

Many cardiologists are also experts in nutrition and exercise science, which impacts a huge number of people who are committed to staying healthy.

 

That's useful for the teams within the largest tech companies that are more focused on wellness and fitness applications, rather than on health and medical.

 

Alphabet has Google Fit. Apple has a fitness group for its Apple Watch. And Amazon is looking at health and wellness applications for its Alexa voice assistant.

It's well-studied

Cardiology is among the most-studied fields in medicine, meaning there's already a lot of evidence to understand the root causes of heart disease, as well as how to prevent it. That's attractive for tech companies, which tend to base their development decisions on data.

Their consumer products are already making a difference

Let's take Apple, as an example. The company launched its first Apple Watch model with a heart rate sensor, never expecting that people would use it to discover they were pregnant, at risk for a heart attack or experiencing a dangerous irregular heart rhythm.

But as people began sharing examples of how the Apple Watch saved their life, the company started to invest heavily in the science and technology to drive more of these stories. A lot of that work culminated in the first-ever clearance for a heart rhythm sensor called an ECG for Apple Watch earlier in the summer.

 

 

read more at https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/17/what-every-tech-company-needs-a-cardiologist.html

 


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Health Apps and Health Policy: What Is Needed? - Health apps require robust regulatory approach: JAMA opinion

Health Apps and Health Policy: What Is Needed? - Health apps require robust regulatory approach: JAMA opinion | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
Substantial gaps exist today between what the marketplace is producing in terms of apps and what is needed to make care better. Specific approaches can be taken at the FDA and at federal agencies that support research and encourage redirection. The marketplace needs to produce applications that will be helpful to patients and health care organizations, along with the ability to identify them. Apps have enormous potential benefits, but these benefits will not be realized unless these issues are addressed.
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Hashtag healthcare : Twitter's new role in Medicine

Hashtag healthcare : Twitter's new role in Medicine | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

In the space of a few short years, Twitter has grown from several strands of inconsequential drivel to an information powerhouse. Originally conceived as a way to keep up to date with a small network of friends and family, the micro-blogging model, which sees the rapid exchange of quick-fire information, was soon recognised as an invaluable resource for professional organisations.

 

An area that has benefited in particular from this format is the healthcare industry, where the output of short bursts of relevant news and developments can mean the difference between life and death. Social media sites such as Twitter now represent the largest source of healthcare discussion in the world. Just as celebrities have found Twitter a useful platform for communicating directly with fans, Tweets cut out the media coverage middleman when it comes to providing accurate news in real time from healthcare professionals. Read on to find out how medical authorities and industry experts are using twitter accounts to change the way healthcare is delivered.

 


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Philippe Marchal
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Sandra John-Baptiste's curator insight, October 21, 4:29 PM
This article explains how Twitter is used as a platform in the FOAM education movement.  Social media is transforming how medical knowledge is shared among medical professionals. Twitter can also provide statistics on diseases and current events based on trending comments.
 
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When to police staff social media use

When to police staff social media use | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Smartphones are ubiquitous. Beyond phone calls and texting, rarely does a moment go by without an urge to peek at the latest Facebook message or newest Instagram picture. While this may be fine at home, it can cause some problems in a medical practice setting if staff members use their smartphones to access social media.

 

Nitin S. Damle, MD, MS, MACP, board member and physician at South County Internal Medicine in Wakefield, R.I., says his staff are instructed to leave their phones in their lockers and turned off during work hours.

“There is no reason anyone should be getting onto any website other than one that is related to work during working hours,” he says.

 

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Does Twitter language reliably predict heart disease? 

Does Twitter language reliably predict heart disease?  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
We comment on Eichstaedt et al.’s (2015a) claim to have shown that language patterns among Twitter users, aggregated at the level of US counties, predicted county-level mortality rates from atherosclerotic heart disease (AHD), with “negative” language being associated with higher rates of death from AHD and “positive” language associated with lower rates. First, we examine some of Eichstaedt et al.’s apparent assumptions about the nature of AHD, as well as some issues related to the secondary analysis of online data and to considering counties as communities. Next, using the data files supplied by Eichstaedt et al., we reproduce their regression- and correlation-based models, substituting mortality from an alternative cause of death—namely, suicide—as the outcome variable, and observe that the purported associations between “negative” and “positive” language and mortality are reversed when suicide is used as the outcome variable. We identify numerous other conceptual and methodological limitations that call into question the robustness and generalizability of Eichstaedt et al.’s claims, even when these are based on the results of their ridge regression/machine learning model. We conclude that there is no good evidence that analyzing Twitter data in bulk in this way can add anything useful to our ability to understand geographical variation in AHD mortality rates.
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Confessioni sui social di un marketer disilluso

Confessioni sui social di un marketer disilluso | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Che fine hanno fatto tutti quegli sforzi su Facebook e Instagram? Un esperto ripercorre ascesa e caduta del social media marketing...

Mi sembra di identificare un chiaro corollario finale: non esiste una social media strategy, ma solo una tattica di canale: come decidere cosa far recitare al telemarketing. Cosa scrivere, a chi, con che tono, con quale foto inutile, e così via. Sono tutte tattiche, non strategie. Esiste, là fuori, solo la strategia aziendale. Puntare a creare affluenza di persone dai cerchi periferici dell’affezione – popolati di sconosciuti – a quelli centrali dei veri fan, ovunque siano e qualunque sia la modalità e l’idea di base. Creare un’olistica macchina digitale (e no) che lavori sui diversi canali, in modo agnostico rispetto a mode e hype. Il resto è social inutilità, che serve a farci perdere tempo su notizie ricopiate dai blog tecnologici americani che ricopiano i comunicati stampa dei vendor tecnologici, i quali a loro volta devono venderci l’ennesima spada magica.

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Questioning patient engagement: research scientists’ perceptions of the challenges of patient engagement in a cardiovascular research network

Questioning patient engagement: research scientists’ perceptions of the challenges of patient engagement in a cardiovascular research network | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it

Concerns about patient involvement in research were related to a lack of clarity about the meaning, process, and impact of involvement. This study highlights the need for education on the meaning of patient engagement, evidence of its impact, and guidance on practical aspects of implementation within this research community.

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Digital games show potential to improve cardiovascular disease-related exercise outcomes 

Digital games show potential to improve cardiovascular disease-related exercise outcomes  | #eHealthPromotion, #SaluteSocial | Scoop.it
A scoping review of studies on game interventions for cardiovascular disease (CVD) self-management found that the use of digital games improved exercise capacity and energy expenditure significantly. Average adherence rates for the game interventions ranged from 70% to 100% across all studies, and they were enjoyed by a majority of participants in studies that assessed perceptions of the interventions. However, the use of digital games did not affect quality of life, self-efficacy, anxiety, or depression, as reported in Games for Health Journal, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click hereto read the full-text article free on the Games for Health Journal website through October 18, 2018.
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