Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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What is the Internet of Things and Why is it Important?

What is the Internet of Things and Why is it Important? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The true value of the Internet of Things does not lay in the lights turning on when the car reaches the driveway, but rather the data that the connected devices collect about its users. Imagine a hospital with connected devices. The data collected from those devices outputs information on the status of patients and runs analytics on the various monitoring machine, helping the hospital to run as optimally as possible.

 

The collection of data from devices will allow consumers, businesses and even entire connected cities to run more efficiently. However, collecting large amounts of data presents challenges.

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The Internet of Things: Buzzword or Big Business?

The Internet of Things: Buzzword or Big Business? | Web of Things | Scoop.it
With trillions of end-point 'things', device cloud platforms, subnets for humans, machines, sensor networks and rampant innovation being fostered globally, the Internet of Things could have the same disruptive potential as the Internet itself.

 

Building on the foundation of the IoT, the Cisco (CSCO) vision is the Internet of Everything, which it defines as bringing together people, process, data, and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before. Cisco believes that there is a $14.4 trillion value at stake in this market, which combines the increased revenues and lower costs that is created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022. The factors driving the trend include mainstreaming of sensors, cloud computing and the migration of everything to IP networks.

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Cisco: $500B in Internet of Everything Opportunities Wasted

Cisco’s extension of the concept of the Internet of Things, or sensor-driven, machine-to-machine Internet traffic into a kind of anything-to-anything network of free-flying data was first and foremost on the company’s mind at its gathering in Boston. And while the company has big numbers to back that up – its figures estimate $14.4 trillion in net profit will be driven over the next 10 years by this movement – it seems very much like a “watch this space” message. Many solution providers that Channelnomics talked to at the show were intrigued by the possibilities, but saw little applicability to their business today.

However, the company’s latest research on the subject may change those eyes from glazing to popped, as the company says that across 21 different use cases for the Internet of Everything (IoE), companies around the world will capture $614 billion in value this year alone. But the bigger news for channel partners is how much is being left on the table. Cisco’s study says that businesses feel there’s another $544 billion this year that could be captured through Internet of Everything types of solutions, but ultimately will not be.

 

Cisco president of sales and development Rob Lloyd suggests that the challenge "involves changing things like business models and company cultures, dismantling command-and-control structures on which many companies are built and establishing processes and systems whereby information is fed to the right people at the right time, and those people are empowered to act on it as quickly as possible."  


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Here, There, Everywhere: Rugged Computers Enable True Workforce Mobility

Here, There, Everywhere: Rugged Computers Enable True Workforce Mobility | Web of Things | Scoop.it

So what are today’s forward-thinking professionals doing with this new technology?

 

They’re finding that work is a whole lot simpler, faster and more enjoyable with data devices that can sort, synthesize and analyze data as well as collect it, and that can work seamlessly with both worksite machinery and advanced office hardware.


Take the public works sector: Government agencies and private companies across the world are using rugged technology for a wide range of tracking, monitoring, reporting and scheduling tasks essential to city maintenance — all while saving time and improving the accuracy of their data.


For example, GPS-enabled devices can tag along worry-free for messy catch-basin cleanup runs and sewer line repairs, and dashboard-mounted tablets with tracking software can simplify data collection on street-sweeping and waste-collection routes, without ill effects from constant road vibrations.


The data these computers collect can be stored, organized, charted, transmitted wirelessly to office locations, and formed into customized reports. Simple manual and sensor-based data input reduces human error and increases accuracy for record-keeping and important reporting, such as for governmental regulations or grant compliance.

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Om Malik: What the internet of things can learn from Minecraft and Lemmings

Once we have a home full of connected devices do we really want to individually manage all of them? Mike Kuniavsky, a principal in the Innovation Services Group at PARC, explains in this weeks podcast how we’re going to have to think differently about programming devices for the internet of things. Devices will need to know what they contain and how those elements might contribute to a certain scenario in the home.

 

For example when you want to watch a movie, you shouldn’t have to program 6 different devices in your home to tell them what they should do when you toggle on your movie setting, your devices should have some sense of what they are capable of and how to enter a set mode. As he did in his chat in February at our San Francisco Internet of Things meetup, Kuniavsky, likened this device behavior to video games like Minecraft or Lemmings, where preset general behaviors determines how the game unfolded as opposed to rigid and specific actions. He explains all this and more in the podcast. Check it out.

 

http://traffic.libsyn.com/gigaom/MIKE_KUNIAVSKY.mp3

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The internet of things: an elephant in the room that threatens to squash us

The internet of things: an elephant in the room that threatens to squash us | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Andy Hobsbawm's (one of the founders of the business EVRYTHNG) business gives me a headache quite quickly as I struggle to imagine the implications of the humungous data generated by everything we touch. And then there's the data generated by mixing up the data with other data in order to create more data that predicts the future and reshapes our existence. Got that? Just a little scary, yes?

 

I don't mind my bike or my fridge talking about my habits but the implications of underwear or individual deodorants having their own Facebook page, or the web-of-things equivalent, is mind-boggling. What if - oh dear, how embarrassing - you don't appear to have a deodorant life? Too much information or not enough, either way as we become even more defined by our consumption this could get vicious. I can sense a lobby forming to say our rights are being eroded in ways that go way beyond what Google's done to us so far.

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Weightless finalizes its white spaces networking standard for the internet of things

Weightless finalizes its white spaces networking standard for the internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Weightless SIG claims the new standard will allow for ultra-low-power transmissions at long-range and at a cheap manufacturing cost. If true, that would make the technology ideal for M2M communications.
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The real breakthrough of Google Glass: controlling the internet of things

The real breakthrough of Google Glass: controlling the internet of things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Many of the first apps for Google Glass will be about consuming and sharing content on the go. But what if Google Glass could unlock control over the world of the Internet of Things both inside and outside the home?

 

"Picture arriving home from work, and the door of your house automatically unlocks to let you in as you walk up to it. Inside, your NPR app comes on the glasses screen and you can tune in or change the channel while you fiddle with turning on the connected sprinkler system for your lawn. Your Nest thermostat app then pops up on your Google Glass screen to let you know that you’ve been good this week and saved a lot of energy, but with a wink you override the conservation mode and crank up the heat.

 

The scenario isn’t as crazy as it sounds and all the basic technology is there. There are mobile apps that already do all of these things. Essentially you’d just be moving the control function from the cell phone touch screen and your fingertips to the screen in front of your eye and either a facial gesture or hand movement. All devices in the home that would benefit from having connectivity and control are getting it, and there will be a variety of remotes that will control them — why not one on your face?"

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Wearable Electronic Sensors Can Now Be Printed Directly on the Skin

Wearable Electronic Sensors Can Now Be Printed Directly on the Skin | Web of Things | Scoop.it
New electronic tattoos could help monitor health during normal daily activities.

 

Taking advantage of recent advances in flexible electronics, researchers have devised a way to “print” devices directly onto the skin so people can wear them for an extended period while performing normal daily activities. Such systems could be used to track health and monitor healing near the skin’s surface, as in the case of surgical wounds.


So-called “epidermal electronics” were demonstrated previously in research from the lab of John Rogers, a materials scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the devices consist of ultrathin electrodes, electronics, sensors, and wireless power and communication systems. In theory, they could attach to the skin and record and transmit electrophysiological measurements for medical purposes. These early versions of the technology, which were designed to be applied to a thin, soft elastomer backing, were “fine for an office environment,” says Rogers, “but if you wanted to go swimming or take a shower they weren’t able to hold up.” Now, Rogers and his coworkers have figured out how to print the electronics right on the skin, making the device more durable and rugged.

 

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IOTA: Internet-of-Things Academy | superflux

IOTA: Internet-of-Things Academy | superflux | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The ambition of our proposed IOTA platform was to support a thriving community involved in imagining, building, and testing projects at the intersection of the physical and the digital. It would provide a space for play and experimentation; a central platform where different 'flavours' of hardware, software and data sets could meet, making it simpler for people to combine a range of elements in ways that support their aims and needs. IOTA addresses key issues around technological literacy, education and empowerment, and the interoperability of various competing standards. As it stands, the internet-of-things has a huge potential to empower users – but could easily end up reinforcing the divide between capable users and those intimidated or outpaced by new technology. We are looking to address this issue by building a real community with active moderators, project curation and rolling community challenges, 'augmenting' a relatively neutral core learning platform with human involvement.
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Wireless LED Lights That Don’t Shine Like LED Lights

Wireless LED Lights That Don’t Shine Like LED Lights | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Released last fall to the adoration of design blogs, Hue provides enough innovations to the way we light up our homes to make you long for the days when a wall-mounted light switch will be a techological relic.

 

A Hue kit--sold for $199 at the Apple store-- come with four wireless LED bulbs, a wireless hub, and an app that you download for your smartphone or tablet and use to communicate with the bulbs, up to 50 at a time.

 

The LEDs can shine at any color on the spectrum, and, with a click, will absorb the exact color from a photograph on your phone. Or you can rely on Hue’s premixed color "recipes," which are tested to promote relaxation, concentration, energy, or reading.

 

Philips isn’t the only player in the game, of course. About the same time that Hue was announced, the Kickstarter drive for LIFX, another Wi-Fi-enabled LED, knocked it out of the park by raising $1.3 million, more than 10 times its goal. LIFX ups the ante by promising to "visualise your music with animated colors" and integrating with Facebook and Twitter for notifications.

 

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CES 2013: The 'internet of things' opens up huge possibilities for retailers

CES 2013: The 'internet of things' opens up huge possibilities for retailers | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A little less sexy than the latest smart TVs perhaps, but drawing significant crowds at CES, were displays of kitchens and kitchen appliances. It is now a very realistic possibility that we will soon (after years of hype) be using fridges that assess when we are running low on certain food items and automatically reorder through our regular online retailer of choice. Given coverage of retail results over the last week and the development of this sort of technology, Morrisons may have even more reason to regret its slow progress in online retail when compared to the likes of Tesco. Another interesting appliance was a dishwasher from LG that liaises with your energy supplier to ensure that it only switches itself on at a time of day when electricity is cheap.


There are a very large number of stands exhibiting smaller scale, wearable computing such as health and fitness monitors and smartwatches (often combined). One of the most interesting of these is the Pebble smartwatch which was the subject of much excitement at CES today. This hotly-anticipated smartwatch was created thanks to $15m of crowdsourced funding (Kickstarter's most successful project to date) and is being made available this month. The Pebble has an e-ink display similar to those found on e-readers and lasts seven days on one battery charge. The screen is able to display a multitude of apps as well as tell the time. Third-party developers will be able to create apps for the watch which can pair up with smartphones running Google's Android software or Apple's iOS. Perhaps of more importance longer term are the devices that will help us monitor our health; not only heartbeat, blood pressure and so on but food intake and amount of exercise.


A huge number of acres of exhibition space was taken by car manufacturers. It feels to me that much of the focus in recent years has been around using technology to improve the quality of the drive as opposed to the in-car experience. But that is clearly about to change. Many manufacturers were displaying technology that can seamlessly link car, smartphone and location data to deliver an enhanced experience. For example, Ford were showing a car that would read your text messages to you as you are driving. Others demonstrated how by synching car and smartphone, the music being played in your car could automatically adapt to driving conditions. One soundtrack for driving faster on an open road, another for city driving.


by Stewart Easterbrook

10 Jan 2013


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Ecovacs Winbot Puts Robotic Muscle Into Window Cleaning

Ecovacs Winbot Puts Robotic Muscle Into Window Cleaning | Web of Things | Scoop.it

You’ve got a robot that vacuums your carpet, and it doesn’t even scare the cat too much anymore. That’s progress, right? So where do you turn next in your quest for automated domestic help? How about a robot that does windows?

The Ecovacs Winbot cleans both sides of a window at the same time, with a two-part system. A driver that contains the motor sits on one side of the glass while a follower unit goes on the other side. The two units are held together with a powerful, variable-strength magnet. The robot senses its position on the window and follows a zig-zag path to cover the entire area. A remote is also included to allow manual direction of the robot.

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The Wi-Fi in your home can track your moves like Xbox Kinect

The Wi-Fi in your home can track your moves like Xbox Kinect | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Want to switch off the living room lights from bed, change channels while washing dishes, or turn the heat up from the couch? A team at the University of Washington has rigged a standard Wi-Fi home network to detect your movements anywhere in the home and convert them into commands to control connected devices.

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Cyber Security in the Internet of Things

Cyber Security in the Internet of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Why do we say IoT requires new thinking about cyber security? Mainly because of the level of data sharing involved. This is a fast-evolving feature of the IoT, around which industrial equipment markets have not yet aligned. Note that we can trace the origins of the IoT to the early efforts by engineers in Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to find ways to monitor, objectively and in real time, how the machines they designed for customers actually performed in the real word. They tended to use the terms telematics and mobile resource management. Soon, however, it became clear how valuable such data would be to their colleagues in product marketing, and in turn to customer service and technical support. As for the customers themselves, they received some benefits, such as maintenance alerts but, generally speaking, they had access to little real-time data, and it was difficult to work with when they did get it.

 

Today, growing numbers of customers recognize how that data could inform their own operations, and even feel it is rightfully theirs, leading to battles over who owns and has access to what data, who is responsible for securing it, and a long list of other related questions. What's more, as systems built by different OEMs interact, there is infighting among them as to what constitutes sensitive or competitive intelligence. Simultaneously, everyone must address the question of how shared access to data exposes them to new legal liabilities with their trading partners.

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Forrester: Google Glass will be the next iPhone

Forrester: Google Glass will be the next iPhone | Web of Things | Scoop.it
"Glass is continuously improving via over-the-air updates and new applications, and we have no doubt that in time, Glass will be the next iPhone," the Forrester study says.

 

"Roughly 21.6 million Americans would buy Google Glass if it were available, a new Forrester report says. But the current Explorer version is more of a Newton — Apple’s flawed and failed PDA — than an iPhone.
That’s 12 percent of the adult population.


In fact, despite the current prototype model’s limited battery life and restrictive API, Glass is more of a “when” than an “if” product, according to the survey of more than 4,600 U.S. adults.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

The easy access to location-based info in full AR is applauded.
Also, bone conduction is said to provide great audio quality, "without disrupting others who are nearby."

 

John Koetsier from VentureBeat contrasts Noam Chomsky’s belief that Glass is a privacy-destroying, Orwellian technology (http://youtu.be/rz1AImQ5jqA), with Forrester's view, "that Glass is not a good covert-surveillance camera — it’s too obvious, and its battery life is too limited."

 

I recall previously curated privacy concerns:
The efforts to ban ... http://goo.gl/IktYb (G+)
The pleas for policies ... http://goo.gl/GV9vW (G+)

 

thanks Tyger AC

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Adopting IPv6 is a Corporate Business Issue

Adopting IPv6 is a Corporate Business Issue | Web of Things | Scoop.it
Along with many groups Internet pioneer Vint Cerf has persistently warned of the imminent exhaustion of IPv4 Internet addresses (see clips from 2010, 2011 and 2012), to largely frustrating effect. The time for warnings is over.

 

"IPv6 adoption is currently perceived as all cost and no value. So organisations are maximising the remaining elbow room in the current IPv4 environment, by, for example, squeezing more out of Network Address Translation (NAT) which allows a network to use minimal addresses, or by renumbering redundant addresses, or by other means such as deploying private networks.

And when it comes to the Internet of Things there is a chorus from some technical but influential people in organisations actively urging restraint on IPv6 adoption.They see IPv6 as a Layer 3 network issue, not an Internet of Things issue. One argument is that IPv6 is just one element towards interoperability in an Internet of Things environment and not the be-all and end-all.  It  points to inherent dangers in equating IPv6 with getting value from the Internet of Things saying, for example, that the thousands of sensor devices around a hub don't necessarily need IPv6. It is only the hub itself that does."


-- Dr John Riley

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Using Visual Recognition to Tap into the Consumer Mindset

Using Visual Recognition to Tap into the Consumer Mindset | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Marketers have been trying to capture that magic moment when a potential consumer is actually looking to interact with your brand."

...

"Current smartphone technology allows for nearly infinitely granular targeting based on behavior, third party data, contextual data like location, and universal sign-in profiles. All of these allow increasingly relevant interactions to follow a consumer across apps and the mobile web, all while waiting for the right moment. While interesting, however, this is not what I am talking about. This is just a refinement of existing approaches to targeting. It’s nothing new."

 

"What I’m talking about is giving consumers control, a tool that allows them to quickly and easily learn something about a specific product or service. I’m talking using our smartphones to create intuitive gateways that bridge the real world with related digital experiences. Whether you call it Web 3.0 or the “internet of things,” this is what mobile is all about and I believe visual recognition technology will play a key role in making it happen."

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Cisco’s Lew Tucker On The Internet Of Everything And The Tie To An App-Centric World

Cisco’s Lew Tucker On The Internet Of Everything And The Tie To An App-Centric World | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Cisco’s Lew Tucker stood onstage today at Cloud Connect and pitched the networking giant’s “Internet of Everything,” an app-centric world that will be worth $14.5 trillion over the next couple of years. Whereas the Internet of Things is all the objects in our world, Tucker says the IoE is the smart grids and, really, the entire supply chain and its transformation.

 

Big enterprise companies are good at this kind of thing. They talk about huge market opportunities and great futures with tremendous upside, but it’s a question of how nimble they can be with startups innovating so fast. Tucker, however, gets credit for explaining how an app-centric world ties in with software-defined networking (SDN) and the switch from traditional, heavyweight systems of records (ERP, CRM) to systems of engagement (apps, lightweight services that provide feedback loops).

 

Tucker, citing Cisco’s own study, says there is $4.9 trillion in immediate opportunity through the development of such things as smart grids, smart factories, smart buildings and smart cities.

...

The IoE also provides a context for the ways we interact with this deep fabric of connected things. An ERP system will become less relevant for companies. Instead, systems of engagement will put us right in the center of a feedback loop that allows us to measure our own selves and in the process connect to all the other smart aspects of our life. That might be in the city of San Francisco when trying to find a parking spot or the smart factory where we order our data-generated personal things.

 

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Jerome BESSON's curator insight, November 10, 2013 1:11 PM

IoE (Internet of everything) annonce-t-il la fin des ERP et autres systèmes CRM au profit d'un  "systems of engagement (apps, lightweight services that provide feedback loops)" ou les apps. sont reines. Le principes :  les data sont déversées dans un lake par les "things"...le lake est scruté en temps réels par des applications "légères" (genre celles des smartphones) qui elles mêmes génèrent de l'intelligence qu'elles déversent à leurs tours...c'est en tout cas ce qu'annonce certain.

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4 Myths about the Internet of Things

Interesting read Kishore Swaminathan, Chief Scientist at Accenture, on the possibilities of the Internet of Things and the myths of the things that are stopping the thing called the Internet of things happening.

 

Myth 1: IoT is a Technology. IoT is a concept, not a technology you would buy. (See also: http://thebln.com/2013/04/the-internet-of-things-a-definition-according-to-cisco/).

 

Myth 2: IoT is the next wave of the Internet. The closest some devices will get to the Internet is using TCP/IP protocols.

 

Myth 3: Regulations on data privacy is a critical enabler of the IoT. Privacy concerns might give rise to more innovative business models, but that is no reason to hold off on understanding what the IoT means for businesses.

 

Myth 4: IoT needs device communication standards. Standards never hurt but most devices will be communicating for specialist and limited reasons.

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We can't let the Internet of Things become the Tyranny of Things

We can't let the Internet of Things become the Tyranny of Things | Web of Things | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things isn’t just some futuristic concept — it already exists. But often badly. For it to succeed, it will need an economy supported by developers who can rely on open standards and APIs.

 

"oT done wrong is the much maligned Internet refrigerator. Seriously? People have been talking about this dog for years now and seemingly every year some earnest manufacturer actually demonstrates yet another realization of this dubious vision, which usually consists of little more than a screen stuck onto the door like some giant fridge magnet. This is IoT designed by a committee.

 

IoT done wrong is all of the proprietary protocol nonsense around home entertainment. When I purchased my last TV, I also bought the same manufacturer’s BluRay player in the hope I could get away with one remote and hiding the latter in a closed cabinet. Boy, was I naïve. I finally succumbed to an expensive universal remote and an IR repeater—a brute force approach if there ever was one. This is not IoT; it is the Tyranny of Things."

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Two good infrastructure considerations for the internet of things from SXSW

Two good infrastructure considerations for the internet of things from SXSW | Web of Things | Scoop.it
We may accept that the internet of things will become commonplace in the next few years, but how do we build out the network and processing required to support it?

 

The network is probably the most important (and is definitely the most expensive) element of the internet of things infrastructure, but another ongoing debate is about where the information collected by the thousands (millions?) of sensors we’ll connect will be turned into action or aggregated to form meaningful insight. Namely, will the processing happen in the cloud, or will it happen locally?

 

Wael Diab, senior technical director at Broadcom’s infrastructure and networking group, noted that the pendulum has swung back and forth between centralized and distributed processing since the mainframe. But what’s worth noting about the internet of things is that there will need to be both — and where the processing takes place will be dynamic depending on several factors.

 

For example, if the promise of a truly universal internet of things ever occurs (as opposed to siloed areas of connectivity in the medical space, the home, the car etc) then devices might send certain types of data to a local hub in a medical or automotive setting because it’s more secure or cheaper, but take advantage of the cloud and wireline broadband in the home or work setting.

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MYO - Wearable Gesture Control from Thalmic Labs

With the wave of your hand, MYO will transform how you interact with your digital world.

 

The MYO armband lets you use the electrical activity in your muscles to wirelessly control your computer, phone, and other favorite digital technologies.

 

Preorder at www.getmyo.com. Supports Mac, Windows, iOS, and Android.

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Epson and Meta Augmented Reality Glasses Take on Google Glass

Epson and Meta Augmented Reality Glasses Take on Google Glass | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Meta, a startup composed primarily of Columbia University, students agrees. In partnership with Epson, the company is releasing a developer’s kit, composed of stereoscopic glasses that offer a super low latency gesture tracking technology which turns your surroundings into your PC and your hands into controllers.


Anna Attkisson

29 Jan 2013


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Parrot Flower Power - smart sensor for your plants (CES 2013 preview)

via ces.cnet


LAS VEGAS--This is what Bluetooth was invented for: a tong you stick in the soil of your plant that tells you when to water it.


The Flower Power is a gadget that Parrot will bring to market at some stage this year -- there is no word on price yet while the company works out how much it can get away with charging. The fork has sensors that send the information they pick up from the soil of your plant via Bluetooth to an iPad app.


Once you have told the app what the plant is, it cross-references the information received with the info in its database to tell you which day it needs watering, whether it's getting enough sun, and if it's hot or cold.

You can move the tongs to different plants, and see information on them all on your tablet screen. It also works on lawns.

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