Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Forrester: Google Glass will be the next iPhone

Forrester: Google Glass will be the next iPhone | Web of Things | Scoop.it
"Glass is continuously improving via over-the-air updates and new applications, and we have no doubt that in time, Glass will be the next iPhone," the Forrester study says.

 

"Roughly 21.6 million Americans would buy Google Glass if it were available, a new Forrester report says. But the current Explorer version is more of a Newton — Apple’s flawed and failed PDA — than an iPhone.
That’s 12 percent of the adult population.


In fact, despite the current prototype model’s limited battery life and restrictive API, Glass is more of a “when” than an “if” product, according to the survey of more than 4,600 U.S. adults.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

The easy access to location-based info in full AR is applauded.
Also, bone conduction is said to provide great audio quality, "without disrupting others who are nearby."

 

John Koetsier from VentureBeat contrasts Noam Chomsky’s belief that Glass is a privacy-destroying, Orwellian technology (http://youtu.be/rz1AImQ5jqA), with Forrester's view, "that Glass is not a good covert-surveillance camera — it’s too obvious, and its battery life is too limited."

 

I recall previously curated privacy concerns:
The efforts to ban ... http://goo.gl/IktYb (G+)
The pleas for policies ... http://goo.gl/GV9vW (G+)

 

thanks Tyger AC

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4 Myths about the Internet of Things

Interesting read Kishore Swaminathan, Chief Scientist at Accenture, on the possibilities of the Internet of Things and the myths of the things that are stopping the thing called the Internet of things happening.

 

Myth 1: IoT is a Technology. IoT is a concept, not a technology you would buy. (See also: http://thebln.com/2013/04/the-internet-of-things-a-definition-according-to-cisco/).

 

Myth 2: IoT is the next wave of the Internet. The closest some devices will get to the Internet is using TCP/IP protocols.

 

Myth 3: Regulations on data privacy is a critical enabler of the IoT. Privacy concerns might give rise to more innovative business models, but that is no reason to hold off on understanding what the IoT means for businesses.

 

Myth 4: IoT needs device communication standards. Standards never hurt but most devices will be communicating for specialist and limited reasons.

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Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother?

Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Say goodbye to privacy: In the future, advertisers, app makers, the government, and even our employers might be able to assess our personalities and react based on what we do with our phones.


Oliver Brdiczka, a manager at PARC, is working on contextual intelligence. The research, he hopes, will allow enterprises and the government to use data that is accumulated as we use our mobile phones. The data mined from our email messages, Facebook conversations, and sensors in the phone can be used for a variety of purposes, including intelligence, marketing and app design, even employee relations. In other words, owning a smart phone with this capability will be like having a spy ratting out your thoughts to the government.


For instance, PARC is working on a project that predicts a person's personality through their online behavior. The idea, Brdiczka said, is to market this data to enterprises, who want to know people's intent for targeted advertising or developing content customization. (...)


"Imagine a device that immediately lights up when you hold it in your hand and offers you the five most likely things you were going to do next: call your co-worker, drive to the meeting you're about to have, book a dinner or catch up on that article that you wanted to read," said Cue CEO Daniel Gross. "We'll be able to breathe life into our current phones, which currently only do things when we explicitly tell them every detail of what we want to do."

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How the Internet of Things could change Australian homes and businesses

Many of the barriers to adopting the Internet of Things in the home revolve around design issues. For example, Williams says a substantial amount of intelligence is required to enable alerts to be sent when the user wants to receive them – not when the events actually occur. (...)

 

The Internet of Things not only has potential in the home, but businesses could also benefit from it to find out what is happening in real time. For example, it could be used to track the exact location of parcels or drivers. (...)

 

Google has already made a move into this area, with the release in June this year of Google Maps Coordinate which allows businesses to track exactly where employees are located through Google Maps. (...)

 

There are numerous issues around privacy and security. For example, allowing a fridge to connect to the internet could create potential holes for hackers to get into personal networks. How readily consumers will accept these potential invasions of privacy remain to be seen, Williams says, but a tightening of online security will help.

 

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The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide

The Internet of Things: chipped, scanned and monitored | Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Web of Things | Scoop.it

China, Japan and the European Union all invest about €1 billion a year in the Internet of Things; it is not known how much the US spends but the country also tags, scans and monitors goods and services. "The question of whether this is a desirable development or not is no longer relevant, the technology is there and we're using it," says IT specialist Arjan Geurts of Twynstra Gudde Advice Bureau.

 

The technical problems have been solved; an RFID or Radio Frequency Identification tag costs just five cents and wireless internet is in the ascendancy. The amount of information being sent is relatively small, which means there is very little chance of overloading the internet connection. Geurts: "the advent of the smartphone is the motor driving technological developments."

 

...

 

Asia is in the vanguard when it comes to the Internet of Things. Van 't Hof: "Chinese and Japanese users have integrated the technology very harmoniously. When China introduced electronic licence plates in order to monitor and regulate traffic, the authorities feared it would lead to riots as the technology could be used to restrict freedom of movement. However, there were no protests once the advantages of the system were explained and assurances about data accumulation were given. Transparency was the key."

 

...

 

The privacy issues don't worry companies very much, but security is very much an issue. Jaap-Henk Hoepman, a computer security and privacy expert attached to Radboud University in Nijmegen, says, "If something goes wrong, the damage is enormous. A company could be stuck with an entire shipment of perishable goods if the tracking system goes down or could be hit by digital industrial espionage."

 

"But that's no reason not to go ahead. We have to be aware of the risks. About 90 percent of the applications for this technology haven't even been thought of yet. And there will certainly be ways to use the technology that will make us wonder how we ever survived without them."

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Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data

Hyperconnected Bodies the rising cloud of selfaware data | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Put all this data in the cloud, (privacy not included) and personal medicine becomes a reality, tracking our mood, skin temperatures and the analysis of correlated data becomes a new picture we have of ourselves, and a new image we can project unto the world.

 

“They’re really external extensions of our mind,” said Joseph Tranquillo, associate professor of biomedical and electrical engineering at Bucknell University. (referring to all our networked devices- CNN)

 

So, vast amounts of data, self-tracking, personal information stock exchange, our own memories in the cloud, implants under our skins transmitting the data continuously.

 

by @Wildcat2030

 


Via Peter Vander Auwera
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Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:58 AM
Thanks Peter, glad you liked the article
Wildcat2030's comment, May 25, 2012 5:59 AM
Thanks for sharing this, glad you liked the article
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can be helpful, but there are privacy concerns

can be helpful, but there are privacy concerns | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Things are getting a “voice,” says Ric Asselstine, chief executive officer of Terepac Corp., a Waterloo company that makes tiny electronics to put into objects to make them “smart” and compatible with the Internet of Things.

 

“At the end of the day, what we’re creating is information,” Asselstine said in a phone interview from Terepac’s headquarters on Colby Drive.

 

There is the potential for “trillions” of devices to be connected to the Internet of Things, he said, noting all of the objects in his office alone.

 

“The potential is literally boundless.”

 

Consumer products, medical devices and agricultural methods, such as managing crop moisture with sensors, can be a part of the Internet of Things.

 

Data about locations and conditions can be transmitted through these objects, Asselstine said.

 

[...]

 

ABI Research analyst Sam Lucero said privacy is already an issue.

 

“We’re already seeing tremendous privacy concerns around, for instance, smart meter data,” said Lucero, practice director of machine-to-machine connectivity for the New York-based tech trends firm.

 

“How is the owner of those devices and that data assured that the data is being used in agreed upon ways and that security is assured?”

 

This is going to be multiplied as different applications and devices become interconnected, he said.

 

TheRecord.com by LuAnn LaSalle

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Commission consults on rules for the ‘Internet of Things’

Realising the enormous economic and societal potential of the IoT requires a level playing field where all players can compete on an equal footing, without gate keepers and locked-in users.

 

Its societal acceptance requires the definition of an ethical and legal framework, supported by technology and providing people with control and security.

 

Through the consultation, the Commission is seeking views on privacy, safety and security, security of critical IoT supported infrastructure, ethics, interoperability, governance and standards.

 

The Internet of today offers access to content and information through connection to web pages from multiple terminals like PCs, smart phones or TVs.

 

The next evolution will make it possible to access information related to the physical environment through connected objects capable of sensing the environment and communicating through smart chips using Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) with or without human intervention.

 

by Enterprise Europe Network

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CIA Chief: We’ll Spy on You Through Your Dishwasher

CIA Chief: We’ll Spy on You Through Your Dishwasher | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, Petraeus mused about the emergence of an “Internet of Things” — that is, wired devices — at a summit for In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm. “‘Transformational’ is an overused word, but I do believe it properly applies to these technologies,” Petraeus enthused, “particularly to their effect on clandestine tradecraft.”

 

All those new online devices are a treasure trove of data if you’re a “person of interest” to the spy community. Once upon a time, spies had to place a bug in your chandelier to hear your conversation. With the rise of the “smart home,” you’d be sending tagged, geolocated data that a spy agency can intercept in real time when you use the lighting app on your phone to adjust your living room’s ambiance.

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Intel’s automotive plans herald the ever connected future

Intel’s automotive plans herald the ever connected future | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"There are aspects to this internet of things that really are profoundly concerning, however. Privacy is one of them. No one can doubt that if all cars are all wi-fi or LTE connected, busybodies in government will no doubt want access to exactly where people are, where people have been, and where people are going. The upside, of course, is that licences, car tax and insurance will all be digitised too, and if a car doesn't check out on the police database, menaces driving without isurance or without passing a test will be easily identifiable."

 

via TechEye.net

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net.wars: Location, location, location

"Blaine Price, a senior lecturer in computing at the Open University, had this cheering thought: as humans become part of the Internet of Things, data leakage will become almost impossible to avoid.

 

Network externalities mean that the number of people using a network increase its value for all other users of that network. What about privacy externalities?"

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The internet of things: an elephant in the room that threatens to squash us

The internet of things: an elephant in the room that threatens to squash us | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Andy Hobsbawm's (one of the founders of the business EVRYTHNG) business gives me a headache quite quickly as I struggle to imagine the implications of the humungous data generated by everything we touch. And then there's the data generated by mixing up the data with other data in order to create more data that predicts the future and reshapes our existence. Got that? Just a little scary, yes?

 

I don't mind my bike or my fridge talking about my habits but the implications of underwear or individual deodorants having their own Facebook page, or the web-of-things equivalent, is mind-boggling. What if - oh dear, how embarrassing - you don't appear to have a deodorant life? Too much information or not enough, either way as we become even more defined by our consumption this could get vicious. I can sense a lobby forming to say our rights are being eroded in ways that go way beyond what Google's done to us so far.

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Revolutionary evolution: The Internet of things and things to come

The digital world is evolution, per se — continuous, rapid, radical, and, by now, so pervasive that it is the Internet which is driving human evolution. It is the Internet which makes possible the future envisioned by genomics researcher Juan Enriquez, one where we choose what and who we are. It is the Internet which allows Intel Fellow Mark Bohr to foresee that "in the future, chips may become integrated directly with the brain, combining AI/human intelligence and dramatically enhancing our cognitive and learning abilities. ... lead[ing] to a "technological singularity" — a point in time when machine intelligence is evolving so rapidly that humans are left far, far behind." Is not the coming of the Internet a "butterfly effect," a change so profound that the world we know today simply disappears? (...)


Revolutionary evolution is the future — a series of paradigm shifts with unpredictable yet profound effects. Precisely because we are building upon an interconnected foundation of complex technologies, any small change may be extremely amplified. That Apple app store (cloud service) offers 650,000 applications, has 400,000,000 credit card numbers on file, and has engaged in 30,000,000,000 transactions. In dollar terms, that is $7 billion in revenue for app developers most of whom can be called "cottage industry." With respect to software development, this is revolutionary evolution. (...)


But even without directly implanted transducers of the sort described by Bohr, every nuanced movement or change in your orbit can be measured analyzed and correlated. So while there may be a temporary fear of direct transducer implants, your physical condition, actions and even intentions can be indirectly inferred from mega-sampling large number of interconnected transducers providing exactly the same result as an implanted transducer. (...)


Are you in control or entitled to be aware of the apps and transducers in your orbit? Would your apps or transducers have some sort of inferred or legal rights preventing you from turning them off or excluding certain ones? Is security merely a euphemism for control, and if so by whom? Is security evolving into an organic model perhaps one where your transducers have a kind of antibody that roams within your orbit identifying and destroying perceived malicious intruders, and if so what about the impact of false positives? Is everything we understand about security about to be obliterated? For that matter, is the meaning of "self" up for grabs?




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Why London's Police Just Set a Horrifying Precedent on Mobile Privacy

Why London's Police Just Set a Horrifying Precedent on Mobile Privacy | Web of Things | Scoop.it
London's Metropolitan Police recently started using machines that allow law enforcement to tap into any mobile device and download call registers, photographs, videos, SMS, email and even social networking data in under 20 minutes.

Via Peter Vander Auwera
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The Internet of things: Smart houses, smart traffic, smart health

In the same way as we put ID chips on products, we can attach sensors to ourselves and allow them to communicate via the Web to other objects around us. The health service is currently testing sensors on elderly patients living at home. The sensors can monitor pulse and blood pressure.


...

 

Major changes in the energy sector in recent years mean that the need for smart, flexible energy is increasing, and that energy production and storage facilities will have to become more coordinated. Current methods mean that our electricity is supplied by large, commercial energy companies from coal, gas and nuclear power stations.


So far, these centrally controlled systems have not needed to communicate much with the outside world. In the future, however, distributed energy sources provided by multiple suppliers will take over. These sources will come from renewable energy such as hydro, wind and solar.

 

...

 

Norwegians are in favour of the service, since we think that the environment and saving energy are important. Americans, on the other hand, are sceptical: 'Are the energy companies going to see inside my fridge?!' With a box on the wall, information will flow both ways, but exactly what data will go out?

 

...

 

Electric cars will be able to connect to the smart future grid. Each car will contain a unique identifying SIM/MIM card, like the card in your mobile.


...

 

When vehicles and road infrastructure come online and communicate with each other, the range of opportunities will be enormous. When your car is connected to the Internet of Traffic, you will be able to receive information about everything that is happening around you. How many other cars are on the road? Which is the quickest route, taking traffic into account, and how fast should you drive if you want the next traffic light to be on green?

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‘Smart Cities’ On The Increase, Despite Obstacles And Risks | Risk Watchdog

The establishment of ‘smart cities’ globally is being driven by the growing need to augment/automate a wide range of legacy productivity, distribution, and consumption platforms.


Current and forecast population growth and urbanisation trends demand the creation of hundreds of new cities – or new communities within existing cities – over the next couple of decades, and this is an ideal time to develop, test and implement new technologies to replace outmoded and inefficient platforms.


...

 

But, security and data privacy are treated as an after-thought. Somebody else’s problem, effectively, according to several people I spoke to. This is worrying if the majority of systems are to be routinely deeply interconnected in the future. A simple virus could shut off the national grid, crash aircraft, or send nuclear reactors critical.

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Dooming scenario

Dooming scenario | Web of Things | Scoop.it

In another scenario, where we can recognize a seamless network “of things” (Rob Van Kranenbrug, Internet of Things) – of cars, of cities, of washing machines communicating – the idea is to leave this network open, and not enclosed in the hands of one middleman, one government, or one or two states (and Moglen will use examples of USA and China), that can choose to act in their un-wisdom. Moglen argues, in a dooming scenario where big data is collected about each citizen, that “we need to reposses the web away from the man in the middle.” Otherwise, our memories will become inferior to this “big data” because what is collected will not be forgotten. “Media consumes us”, he concludes, “watching us watching it,” and the freedom of thought may be lost forever if there wasn't anyone left running free software, securing free (un-surveilled) media, leaving the seamless network – open.

 

In my view, the central question was revolving around the ways of securing our own autonomy[...]

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Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report

Machine-to-machine communication reaching tipping point - report | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Services from healthcare to energy will change over the next decade as machine-to-machine communication facilitates more sophisticated automation.

 

The shift will be led by a combination of improved network communication, smaller and lower cost embedded devices and the development of common standards.

 

However, privacy, security and the risk of network congestion will need to be overcome, while technology standards and streamlined regulations are also a prerequisite.

 

These claims are made in a new report from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), entitled Rise of the Machines

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European Commission gets interested in the Internet of Things

The European Commission wants to find out whether there is enough of a business case for a single firm to exploit the market. In the commission's statement of intent it said it wants to find out about privacy, security and safety and whether societial acceptance requires ethical and legal frameworks to be put into place.

 

The commission is right in treating the Internet of Things seriously. While the term might be something of a marketer's delight, the underlying principles behind it are extremely powerful and could generate a lot of money for private companies, which typically means that users' and public interests are sacrificed on the altar of profits.

Source: The Inquirer (http://s.tt/19dZS)
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The wireless world: Is there chaos around the corner?

The wireless world: Is there chaos around the corner? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Not everyone is looking forward to this with open arms however, for the same reasons people are against ID cards, and have rightfully suspicious views of centralised data. Not everyone wants their underpants to beam their movements directly to the government or their spouse. Throwing a surprise party? Forget it. Hide-and-seek? Out of the question.


‘Everyday objects are increasingly going to become gateways to services beyond the objects themselves.’ says Nathan Miller, Insight Curator for Crayon consumer insight agency.. ‘Having ‘smart objects’ make decisions for us could be dangerous. However, as these objects and technologies become more accessible, it’s almost certain that many of us will find ways to control our own data. The centralisation, control and freeness of our data is a choice of design rather than a requirement of technology.’"

 

via HumansInvent.com

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10 ways a digital Big Brother can be good for you

10 ways a digital Big Brother can be good for you | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"These days, Big Brother doesn't need to do much snooping. We just tell him what we're up to. We tweet, check in on Foursquare, use digital payment systems and generally live so publicly that spying loses at least some degree of utility.


Meanwhile, we're quickly expanding the systems we've built to monitor ourselves and our environments. We connect our power consumption to the internet via "smart meters," we let Google's cameras map our streets and we use wireless gadgets to transmit vital signs to doctors."

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Where objects talk and humans watch

"Given how connected the world would become, shoelaces could talk to wardrobes, cars could set appointments with mechanics themselves, and stores could tell you what would be appropriate for you, based on your past purchase preferences."

 

"Analysts predict the phenomenon to gain widespread attention within the next few years, and the world to be ‘taken over’ in just a decade. Soon enough, IoT-related privacy will become an issue and the inevitable threat of hackers will emerge (in a connected world, they could be infinitely more dangerous than in The Net)."

 

via DAWN.COM Blog

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