Web of Things
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Web of Things
How wirelessly connecting objects to the Internet can help organisations anticipate change.
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Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother?

Contextual Intelligence: Smart Phones To Become Big Brother? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

Say goodbye to privacy: In the future, advertisers, app makers, the government, and even our employers might be able to assess our personalities and react based on what we do with our phones.


Oliver Brdiczka, a manager at PARC, is working on contextual intelligence. The research, he hopes, will allow enterprises and the government to use data that is accumulated as we use our mobile phones. The data mined from our email messages, Facebook conversations, and sensors in the phone can be used for a variety of purposes, including intelligence, marketing and app design, even employee relations. In other words, owning a smart phone with this capability will be like having a spy ratting out your thoughts to the government.


For instance, PARC is working on a project that predicts a person's personality through their online behavior. The idea, Brdiczka said, is to market this data to enterprises, who want to know people's intent for targeted advertising or developing content customization. (...)


"Imagine a device that immediately lights up when you hold it in your hand and offers you the five most likely things you were going to do next: call your co-worker, drive to the meeting you're about to have, book a dinner or catch up on that article that you wanted to read," said Cue CEO Daniel Gross. "We'll be able to breathe life into our current phones, which currently only do things when we explicitly tell them every detail of what we want to do."

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ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge

ARM forms M2M supergroup in Cambridge | Web of Things | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things represents a big opportunity to drive growth for both UK and worldwide economies. According to IMS Research, governments will play a key role in defining the regulations that will propel shipments for M2M communications modules to more than 118 million units by 2016, especially in the automotive sector.

 ...

The first forum will meet on August 24 in the UK and will be chaired by Gary Atkinson, who leads the Internet of Things initiative at ARM.

 

“In the next five years, over £2.4 billion will be spent in the UK on smart home energy management devices, ranging from smart meters themselves to in-home devices that are connected to them. This is a great example of an Internet of Things application, but is only a fraction of the market that will open up over the next 15-20 years,” said Atkinson.

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EU commission urged to be 'more ambitious' on digital technology:

It declares, "The European commission wants to know what framework is needed to unleash the potential economic and societal benefits of the IoT, while ensuring an adequate level of control of the devices gathering, processing and storing information."

 

The commission will draw responses to its consultation into a package of proposals, but it is not scheduled to be published until summer 2013.

 

Harbour said, "There is huge unexploited potential in the internet of things. If we can agree the necessary specifications and protocols on a Europe-wide basis, it will unlock a myriad of socially and economically attractive technologies.

 

"People on the move could use their smartphone to control the fridge or central heating back at home or to lock and unlock their doors. Health services could collect and share real time information about the care of patients in remote locations. The possibilities are endless."

 

theparliament.com

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'City in a garden' can still be wired

'City in a garden' can still be wired | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A new technology revolution is brewing, which Harrison dubs the wired city, or "the internet of things".

 

Harrison - a softly spoken type, happiest when he discussing the techie details - is a British scientist who has taken a roundabout route through research in medical imaging and mobile computing to head IBM's Smarter City strategy.  [...]

 

Harrison says the foundation of the smart cities of the future is the three "i's" of instrumentation, interconnection and intelligence.

 

The interconnection is the obvious bit. With cheap and ubiquitous communication - broadband, wi-fi, cellphones, the internet - people can be digitally plugged in the whole time.  [...]

 

But there is an equivalent revolution happening in instrumentation - the cheap sensors, GPS locator chips and other data gathering and tracking devices that can be made for throwaway prices.

 

From a city bus to a private car to a pallet of goods to a can of beans, there is nothing that cannot be monitored, measured or accessed in real-time.

Together, interconnection and instrumentation makes for a nervous system and its sense organs: a wired city with a network of perception and control.

 

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The wireless world: Is there chaos around the corner?

The wireless world: Is there chaos around the corner? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"Not everyone is looking forward to this with open arms however, for the same reasons people are against ID cards, and have rightfully suspicious views of centralised data. Not everyone wants their underpants to beam their movements directly to the government or their spouse. Throwing a surprise party? Forget it. Hide-and-seek? Out of the question.


‘Everyday objects are increasingly going to become gateways to services beyond the objects themselves.’ says Nathan Miller, Insight Curator for Crayon consumer insight agency.. ‘Having ‘smart objects’ make decisions for us could be dangerous. However, as these objects and technologies become more accessible, it’s almost certain that many of us will find ways to control our own data. The centralisation, control and freeness of our data is a choice of design rather than a requirement of technology.’"

 

via HumansInvent.com

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Government gives away £500,000 to 10 lucky firms to build ‘Internet of Things’

"A UK GOVERNMENT backed project is giving 10 British companies up to £50,000 each to conduct preparatory studies for moving towards an applications and services marketplace, or 'internet of things'.
Source: The Inquirer (http://s.tt/15bJm)

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Duncan Jefferies: How the 'internet of things' could radically change local government

"The IoT is linked to a number of other emerging ideas, such as smart cities, pervasive sensing and machine-to-machine communication – all of which are being tentatively explored by businesses and government. Regardless of what name it is given, this merger of the physical and virtual worlds could allow local authorities to deliver much more efficient services, reducing waste and unlocking reams of useful data: think water mains loaded with clusters of sensors that can alert engineers to leaks or blockages, or lampposts that can detect light levels and save energy by turning themselves off. Sensors could even be used to check the effectiveness of waste removal and recycling services, or help the police locate stolen goods."

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If the Internet of Things Will Be So Big, Why Is It Still a Mystery?

If the Internet of Things Will Be So Big, Why Is It Still a Mystery? | Web of Things | Scoop.it

A new market research study available from a British firm, Companies and Markets, predicts that by 2017 the global Internet of Things market will reach sales of $290 billion.


First, wow.


Second, I'm forced to ask again: If the "IoT" has such short-term promise (not to mention its long-term transformational impact on every aspect of our society and economy), why does the very term, let alone the examples that are already making it a reality, remain such a mystery in the U.S? I have yet to find an intelligent layman who's already familiar with the IoT before I explain it.

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mHealth: The Next Frontier For Mobile Service Growth - Forbes

Wearable body sensors and remote monitoring can keep chronic patients out of hospitals and improve their quality of life while significantly reducing admission expenses.

 

Analyst forecasts estimate the potential value of the mHealth market will be $4.6 billion by 2014. The driving forces behind this expected uptick are numerous. Mounting pressure to cut burgeoning costs in the U.S. healthcare system is a government mandated objective; in particular, preventable readmissions cost an estimated $12–17 billion per year. On top of this lies the problem of an aging population, exacerbated by the size of the baby boomer demographic. Americans aged 60 or older represented 18 percent of the U.S. population in 2009; , this segment is expected to grow to 27 percent by 2050.

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Commission consults on rules for the ‘Internet of Things’

Realising the enormous economic and societal potential of the IoT requires a level playing field where all players can compete on an equal footing, without gate keepers and locked-in users.

 

Its societal acceptance requires the definition of an ethical and legal framework, supported by technology and providing people with control and security.

 

Through the consultation, the Commission is seeking views on privacy, safety and security, security of critical IoT supported infrastructure, ethics, interoperability, governance and standards.

 

The Internet of today offers access to content and information through connection to web pages from multiple terminals like PCs, smart phones or TVs.

 

The next evolution will make it possible to access information related to the physical environment through connected objects capable of sensing the environment and communicating through smart chips using Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) with or without human intervention.

 

by Enterprise Europe Network

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Difference Engine: Wireless’s colliding worlds

Difference Engine: Wireless’s colliding worlds | Web of Things | Scoop.it

At Rice University in Houston, Texas, home to the first residential Super Wi-Fi network, white-space is used to carry data back from a series of conventional Wi-Fi routers scattered around the campus. In the future, white space will have other, more prosaic applications—such as linking machines autonomously to other machines in a so-called “internet of things”.

 

via The Economist

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Intel’s automotive plans herald the ever connected future

Intel’s automotive plans herald the ever connected future | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"There are aspects to this internet of things that really are profoundly concerning, however. Privacy is one of them. No one can doubt that if all cars are all wi-fi or LTE connected, busybodies in government will no doubt want access to exactly where people are, where people have been, and where people are going. The upside, of course, is that licences, car tax and insurance will all be digitised too, and if a car doesn't check out on the police database, menaces driving without isurance or without passing a test will be easily identifiable."

 

via TechEye.net

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10 ways a digital Big Brother can be good for you

10 ways a digital Big Brother can be good for you | Web of Things | Scoop.it

"These days, Big Brother doesn't need to do much snooping. We just tell him what we're up to. We tweet, check in on Foursquare, use digital payment systems and generally live so publicly that spying loses at least some degree of utility.


Meanwhile, we're quickly expanding the systems we've built to monitor ourselves and our environments. We connect our power consumption to the internet via "smart meters," we let Google's cameras map our streets and we use wireless gadgets to transmit vital signs to doctors."

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How the 'internet of things' could radically change local government

"The IoT is linked to a number of other emerging ideas, such as smart cities, pervasive sensing and machine-to-machine communication – all of which are being tentatively explored by businesses and government. Regardless of what name it is given, this merger of the physical and virtual worlds could allow local authorities to deliver much more efficient services, reducing waste and unlocking reams of useful data: think water mains loaded with clusters of sensors that can alert engineers to leaks or blockages, or lampposts that can detect light levels and save energy by turning themselves off. Sensors could even be used to check the effectiveness of waste removal and recycling services, or help the police locate stolen goods."

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