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Geographic analysis for the zombie apocalypse

Can geography save your life in case of, say, a zombie apocalypse? Understanding the push and pull factors that create geographic movement -- or how people, resources, and even ideas travel -- might help you determine the location that's best for survival. David Hunter playfully analyzes the geography skills that you'd need to escape the zombies.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 24, 2017 3:48 PM

This tongue -in-cheek TED-ED lesson shows how the concepts of movement are spatial, and of course, critical in an zombie apocalypse.  Good vocabulary (push factors, pull factors, migration, infrastructure, etc.) is used in this clip.  

 

Tags: mobilitymigration, TED, video.

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"The Last of the Free Seas"

"The Last of the Free Seas" | web maps | Scoop.it

"The Last of the Free Seas is the title of this fantastic map of the Great Lakes made by Boris Artzbasheff.  It was published in Fortune Magazine in July 1940."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 14, 2017 5:23 PM

The inland waterways were absolutely critical to the demographic and economic development of the eastern part of the United States, especially from 1820-1940.  Before World War II, Great Lakes shipping exceeded the tonnage of U.S. Pacific Coast shipping (see hi-res map here). World War II and the beginning of the Cold War led to a consolidation of naval power for the United States and its allies, greatly expanding Pacific shipping trade and spurring fast-developing economies countries. 

 

Great Lakes shipping dramatically declined, in part because steel production has gone to lower-cost producers that were connected to the U.S. economy through the expanded trade.  Some could see irony since the steel warships created from the Great Lakes manufacturing enabled expanded Pacific and Atlantic trade that led to the decline of Great Lakes manufacturing and regional struggles in the rust belt.  Still, more than 200 million tons of cargo, mostly iron ore, coal, and grain, travel across the Great Lakes annually.

 

This deindustrialization clearly is a huge economic negative but the environmental impacts for lakeside communities has been enormous.  Industrial emissions in the watershed and shipping pollution in the lakes went down as waterfowl populations returned and more waterfront property became swimmable again.  Still this map of the environmental stress on the Great Lakes shows they are far from pristine.    

 

Tagsenvironment, historicalwater, resources, transportation, industry, economicregions, globalization.

 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, August 8, 2017 9:08 PM
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Mapping the world at war - Geographical

Mapping the world at war - Geographical | web maps | Scoop.it
An interactive map highlights the shocking number of ongoing conflicts around the world
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The Incredible growth of megacities

The Incredible growth of megacities | web maps | Scoop.it

"The world’s cities are booming and their growth is changing the face of the planet. Around 77 million people are moving from rural to urban areas each year. The latest UN World Cities Report has found that the number of “megacities” – those with more than 10 million people – has more than doubled over the past two decades, from 14 in 1995 to 29 in 2016. And whereas the developed world was once the home of the biggest cities, this map shows that it is now the developing world taking the lead."

 

Tags: urban, megacities, regions.


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Carson Dean Williamson's curator insight, May 11, 2017 10:43 AM
This relates to our chapter by showing some facts on mega cities. Mega cities are metropolitan areas that have a high population. These cities are the definition of urban development around the world. There is currently 29 mega cities (since 2016) around the world. This article showed the growth of mega cities and urban development of the city.
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
Melih Pekyatirmaci's curator insight, May 20, 2017 7:31 PM
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How the first city got started 12,000 years ago

"In this animated video, Jonathan F. P. Rose explains how the first city was started in Turkey, 12,000 years ago."


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Angel Peeples's curator insight, May 11, 2017 2:41 PM
  This article is related to world cultural by being about urbanization. My opinion on this article is that I cant believe that it was that long ago the first city started. Turkey was the first place of the first city because it was were agriculture started. I think it is pretty cool it all started with a structure that people just started building around. 
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 19, 2017 10:25 AM
unit 7
Deanna Wiist's curator insight, September 12, 2017 9:03 PM

What led to the first urban settlements? We know that the beginnings of agriculture are closely connected to the first forays into agriculture and the domestication of animals.  This brief video puts some archeological specificity on the though exercise, "what would you need to start the first city in a world without cities?" 

 

Tags: urban, placehistorical.

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Putting Canada’s Population in Perspective

Putting Canada’s Population in Perspective | web maps | Scoop.it
Canada is a big country, the second largest in the world behind only Russia. But most of its 35 million people live in a very small area. To see how small, follow the series of maps below. Where do Canada’s people live? (size = population) This is a cartogram, a map in which the area […]
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Teen creates insanely detailed map of stereotypes around the world

Teen creates insanely detailed map of stereotypes around the world | web maps | Scoop.it
17-year-old Martin Vargic has gone great lengths to really offend everyone (just kidding, Martin) by making a map that shows the most prevalent stereotypes
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This gorgeous interactive world map visualizes real-time weather data

This gorgeous interactive world map visualizes real-time weather data | web maps | Scoop.it
Weather apps, although a useful thing to have on a smartphone or bookmarked on your laptop, aren't generally known for their beauty. Ventusky, a web application launched earlier this year, wants to change that. It was created by Czech meteorological company InMeteo, the company behind In-počasí, one of that country's most reputable weather information websites. Check it out here. If you do nothing, you can simply marve
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Maptia · A World of Stories

Maptia · A World of Stories | web maps | Scoop.it
Join Maptia to discover a world of remarkable stories, told by some of the most inspiring photographers, writers, and adventurers on the planet, and to publish and share your stories as part of our thoughtful community.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 24, 2016 2:53 PM

Amazing content to build lessons around.

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, July 26, 2016 2:44 AM
A beautiful website where we can read some captivating stories about the world around us. The creative part is also present as we can be the ones publishing our own. One mor challenge for our students!
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Poles of Inaccessibility

Poles of Inaccessibility | web maps | Scoop.it
Geography nuts have located the hardest place to get to on every continent and beyond.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 20, 2016 9:59 AM

The middle of nowhere...this is a common expression that is used to convey isolation, backwardness, wilderness, or a lack of network connections.  This article focuses on 8 places that are the farthest away from coasts as well as land (known as 'Poles of Inaccessibility').  The point on the map above is Point Nemo, right in the middle of the South Pacific Ocean; it is the farthest place on Earth from land and is one of the best candidates for the world champion title of "the middle of nowehere."  What is it close to?  Nothing. 

 

Tagsplace, distance, site, Oceania.

Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 24, 12:49 PM
The places in this article really gives a whole new meaning to “the middle of nowhere.”  People often say they want to settle in the middle of nowhere to be alone, but this article points out that no one actually lives at these exact points, and few people live nearby.  This shows that in order to have a successful settlement, people need to have access to both land and water.  Without being able to get to both, temperatures become incredibly unbearable, resources are sparse, and access to the rest of the world is very difficult.  It is interesting that the part of the earth that is the farthest away from land, Point Nemo, happens to be in Oceania.  Oceania is so sparsely populated compared to the other regions of the world, so the fact that the point farthest away from land is located in this region helps to explain this.  The closest land to Point Nemo are small islands that are also very isolated.  Oceania itself is also generally isolated, since most land is far from the continents, except Australia because it is a continent.  The isolation of all these islands means it is difficult to live in these areas, which was probably far worse before globalization brought trade.  The people living on the islands of Oceania would have to rely solely on what was on their islands.  I am not a person who enjoys isolation very much, so I have no plans to visit these locations any time soon.
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220 years of US population changes in one map

Every 10 years, the Census Bureau calculates the exact center of the US population. Here's what that statistic shows about our history.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 15, 2016 1:46 PM

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the video above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to the podcast version of the article or a shorter podcast by NPR

 

Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?

 

Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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Maps Show Where Tourists Go—and Where Locals Do

Maps Show Where Tourists Go—and Where Locals Do | web maps | Scoop.it
GEOGRAPHY If you want to find tourists snapping pictures, you probably know where to go—Times Square in New York City, the Embarcadero in San Francisco, or Chicago's Magnificent Mile. But what locals think is picture-worthy in these cities is often substantially different. (Washington Post) Use our resources to better understand urban geography. Teachers, scroll down…
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The highest and lowest elevation points of 20 countries around the world [INFOGRAPHIC]

The highest and lowest elevation points of 20 countries around the world [INFOGRAPHIC] | web maps | Scoop.it
A country's altitude can vary from really low to incredibly high points. This infographic shows 20 country's highest and lowest points.
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Mapped: the United States and Canada at the same latitudes as Europe

Mapped: the United States and Canada at the same latitudes as Europe | web maps | Scoop.it
When looking at a regular map of the world, it may be difficult to images what city is on the same latitude as yours. We've solved that problem.
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Growth of Colonial Settlement

Growth of Colonial Settlement | web maps | Scoop.it

European settlement began in the region around Chesapeake Bay and in the Northeast, then spread south and west into the Appalachian Mountains.

 

Questions to Ponder: How did European immigrants settle along the East Coast? How did geography determine settlement patterns? 

 

Tags: migration, map, historical, colonialism, USA, National Geographic.


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Lights of Human Activity Shine in NASA's Image of Earth at Night

NASA scientists have just released the first new global map of Earth at night since 2012. This nighttime look at our home planet, dubbed the Black Marble, provides researchers with a unique perspective of human activities around the globe. By studying Earth at night, researchers can investigate how cities expand, monitor light intensity to estimate energy use and economic activity, and aid in disaster response.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 20, 2017 12:19 PM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends, Geographic Perspective, Spatial Significance
Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 5:28 PM
Unit 1
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, August 13, 11:50 AM

This kind of data also correlated with population density and location.

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Every Name Is a Music Reference

Every Name Is a Music Reference | web maps | Scoop.it
The designers behind the “Alternative Love Blueprint” are back with a map of the world. Only this map uses song titles instead of place names.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 18, 2016 9:29 PM

As one friend said, I think we can forgive the poor projection choice because of the incredibly clever naming scheme of this map.  Very fun idea, and worth exploring. 

 

Tags: music, map.

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, January 23, 2017 3:41 AM
Lots of fun here and how long did this take to put together?

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Watch as the world’s cities appear one-by-one over 6,000 years

Watch as the world’s cities appear one-by-one over 6,000 years | web maps | Scoop.it
Watch the rise of human cities, beginning with [arguably] the world’s first city in 3700 BC and continuing up to the present. Use the controls at the bottom to pause/resume the map and to move back and forth in time. The history of urbanization, 3700 BC – 2000 AD (full-screen version) full screen / video […]
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A More Accurate World Map Wins Prestigious Japanese Design Award

A More Accurate World Map Wins Prestigious Japanese Design Award | web maps | Scoop.it

"To design a map of the world is no easy task. Because maps represent the spherical Earth in 2D form, they cannot help but be distorted, which is why Greenland and Antarctica usually look far more gigantic than they really are, while Africa appears vastly smaller than its true size. The AuthaGraph World Map tries to correct these issues, showing the world closer to how it actually is in all its spherical glory."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2016 2:03 PM

This just shows how subjective the concept of "accurate" can be. First off, this is a fabulous map that nicely minimizes distortions (distance, direction, area, and shape) of the land on our planet. Any criticism of the map just shows the impossibility of making an accurate 2D map of a 3D Earth, but I still think that there is plenty of room to discuss the flaws/distortions that were chosen instead of others. It is interesting to note that a Japanese contest awarded this map with it's top honor (I doubt a Brazilian organization would feel the same way about this map). This map does make with some traditional cartographic conventions in its representation of Earth.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some elements of this map that are different from more traditional maps? This map claims to be more accurate; does that make it more useful?    

 

Tags: visualization, mapping, cartography, geospatial, technology.

Paula Weir's curator insight, November 15, 2016 9:13 AM
I like this 
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A Visual History Of Urbanization, From The World's First City In 3700 BC To The Present

A Visual History Of Urbanization, From The World's First City In 3700 BC To The Present | web maps | Scoop.it
A Visual History Of Urbanization, From The World's First City In 3700 BC To The Present
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Interactive Climate Map

Interactive Climate Map | web maps | Scoop.it

"Obsessed as we are with cartography we in Staridas Geography perceive any aspect of the actual 3D World as a constant opportunity for another pretty map creation!"


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2016 11:35 AM

This is a great interactive map of the world's climate zones. 

 

Tags: ESRIStoryMapedtech, GIS, mapping, cartographyphysical.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 19, 2016 7:47 PM

Great map to discuss global distribution of biomes and links to climate 

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 21, 2016 6:24 PM
Fun way for students to learn about the diverse climates around the world, by selecting a location on the map students are shown the climatic data of the selected place.
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Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped

Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped | web maps | Scoop.it

"Data viz extraordinaire Max Galka created this map using NASA’s gridded population data, which counts the global population within each nine-square-mile patch of Earth, instead of within each each district, state, or country border. Out of the 28 million total cells, the ones with a population over 8,000 are colored in yellow."

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.


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Brian Weekley's curator insight, July 27, 2016 10:47 AM
Great simple map of world population.  Scroll down and look at the U.S.  It reflects the global trend.  This also has political implications, as evidenced by voting patterns in the 2012 presidential election.  Elections are dependent upon votes, which come from people, which are primarily clustered in cities.  Election campaigns would use this data to plan their schedules as to where to focus their campaigning efforts.  For the folks in Wyoming, they rarely see candidates other than during the primaries.  And these world populationclusters have been relatively consistent historically, particularly in south and east Asia.  Northern India has serious carrying capacity challenges. Notice the clusters along the Nile- evidence of arable land.
Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:49 PM
Fantastic visualization!
David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 8, 2016 5:55 PM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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Canada is a huge country. Most of it is unfit for human habitation.

Canada is a huge country. Most of it is unfit for human habitation. | web maps | Scoop.it

"The area below the red line includes most of Nova Scotia, in Canada's east, but most of the population comes from the area a little farther west, in a sliver of Quebec and a densely populated stretch of Ontario near the Great Lakes."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 2016 5:15 PM

Admitted, the web Mercator projection of this map distorts the far northern territories of Canada, but still it hammers home some fascinating truths about Canada's population distribution.  Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  

 

TagsCanada, map, North America, population, density.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, June 4, 2016 10:27 AM
This article highlights the geographic concept of Spatial Significance
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 4, 2016 5:13 PM

Factors influencing settlement patterns - concentrations of population 

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32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World

32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World | web maps | Scoop.it
Our world is a complex network of people, places and things. Here are 32 maps will teach you something new about our interconnected planet.

Via Seth Dixon
Bob Zavitz's insight:

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

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StacyOstrom's curator insight, April 4, 2016 9:18 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

macellomedeiros's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:18 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

Lynne Stone's curator insight, August 30, 2016 8:08 PM
Everything posted by Seth Dixon really contributes to our understanding to the world.