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Rescooped by David Stapleton from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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How Long Should Your eLearning​ Module Be?

How Long Should Your eLearning​ Module Be? | wealth business & social media | Scoop.it

How long should an eLearning module be? What is the ideal length? Can people concentrate for longer than their shoe size in minutes? What is the average attention span?

 

Attention span is the amount of concentrated time a person can spend on a task without becoming distracted. Common estimates for sustained attention to a freely chosen task range from about five minutes for a two-year-old child, to a maximum of around 20 minutes in older children and adults. (www.Wikipedia.org)

 

Recently I had to sit through 2 hours of on-line Contractor Induction which we had developed for a client. The reason was this – we were developing a video to include in another Induction for Ship Captains for an LNG production facility, and I was part of the video crew from our company in charge of the droning video.

Initially, I was like, “OMG, do I really have to go through this?” But after realising it was mandatory, I chose to do it as soon as possible. I have to be honest, I thoroughly enjoyed this experience as it was broken into smaller sections: facility, safety, ecosystem, wildlife responsibilities etc. These together with the various interactivity made it engaging.

 

So how do you decide the ideal eLearning length?

 

1.    Learn from a favourite TV Series

Think of a TV Series you love to watch. It’s made up of Seasons, Episodes and Acts. Every Season has about 12 Episodes and every Episode has 5 or 6 Acts. Each Act lasts about 10 minutes. Why are there Acts every 10 minutes? The screenwriters understand human behaviour and that we lose attention after 10 minutes.

 

They know the way we restore attention is by taking a rest, doing a different kind of activity, changing mental focus, or deliberately choosing to re-focus on the first topic.

 

One large financial client we have is now developing 5-8 minutes eLearning modules and every employee goes to work and watches one module per day.

 

2.    Know how essential this training is

I like to think of ‘essential’ like a set of traffic lights.

Red, is ‘mandatory’. This could be a longer module broken up into smaller segments. eg InductionAmber, is ‘important but not mandatory’. This needs to be at a length that people will see as a win/win. Long enough to get the message and training without it encroaching on all my other pressures and responsibilities. This should be 10 -15 minutes maximum.Green, is ‘good to know’. It needs to be short, sharp or if longer requires gamification or great interactivity. This is generally 2-5 minutes or could be longer if it’s engaging.

 

One of our clients is a Pharma company. We have been developed many 2-3 minute eLearning modules for their channel to watch, explaining the different products and their benefits to the consumer.

 

3.    How engaging can you make it?

People are generally capable of a longer attention span when they are doing something that they find enjoyable or intrinsically motivating. In eLearning, we achieve this through interactive, reality-based scenarios, quizzes and gamification. These engage people and therefore their attention span.

 

Introducing a video can also help to hold attention as it introduces emotion. The video could involve: people at work, actors, drone footage, 360-degree exploration or animation.

 

With different personalities, different learning styles and different ages the question ‘How long should your eLearning module be?’ is always going to be a challenging one. Over the past 5 years, we have gone from eLearning modules being hours long to being minutes long. However, at the end of the day what is probably the most important goal is meeting your Learning Objectives.

 

If you are still unsure then learn from some of the largest companies today. Most companies are aiming for 8-14 minutes and if there is a subject that requires more then they break it into segments. A bit like a TV series really ��

 

Chris Gaborit is managing director of The Learning Factor, an eLearning company who loves technology linked to learning. Follow him here on Linkedin, on Twitter @droneservicesAU and Instagram @idronefoto


Via The Learning Factor
David Stapleton's insight:
Know how essential this training is I like to think of ‘essential’ like a set of traffic lights.Green, is ‘good to know’.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 11, 5:00 PM

How long should an eLearning module be? What is the ideal length? Can people concentrate for longer than their shoe size in minutes? What is the average attention span?

bostmag's curator insight, March 25, 9:49 AM

How long should an eLearning module be? What is the ideal length? Can people concentrate for longer than their shoe size in minutes? What is the average attention span?

Rescooped by David Stapleton from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Since Your Brain Constantly Compares You With Everyone Else, Try This | Fast Company

Since Your Brain Constantly Compares You With Everyone Else, Try This | Fast Company | wealth business & social media | Scoop.it

Your brain is a comparison engine. In every new situation, it automatically rifles through your memory of every other situation you’ve encountered in the past. It swiftly finds one or a few that are similar to the current scenario, then uses that information to figure out what to do next. Most of the time, you do this without you ever realizing it.

 

Sometimes this cognitive reflex works to your advantage, and sometimes it doesn’t. But since it’s always happening anyway, you might as well make it work for you more often than against you–at least as best you can. Here’s how.


Via The Learning Factor
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After everything we have learned we can clearly see everything
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 15, 2017 6:36 PM

Social comparisons sometimes make us feel better and sometimes don’t. Here’s how to use that tendency to actually get better.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, October 16, 2017 1:48 AM

When you compare yourself to someone better than you on a dimension, that’s called an “upward social comparison”; when you compare yourself to someone you consider worse off on a given dimension, it’s “a downward social comparison.” So while these comparisons can be useful (in both directions) for figuring out where you stand, they can make you miserable, too. If you’re always making upward social comparisons and find yourself lacking something, you may start feeling bad about how you measure up.

Rescooped by David Stapleton from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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How You Can Create A Schedule That Really Works For You

How You Can Create A Schedule That Really Works For You | wealth business & social media | Scoop.it

hen it comes to our daily schedule, most people fall into one of two camps:

 

The over-scheduler: Their calendars look like a kindergartener’s finger painting. Meetings overlap meetings while reminders for events, breaks, tasks, and more meetings are going off like it’s New Year’s Eve. Their days are determined from the moment they wake up to their evening routine.

 

The minimalist: Also known as “The Dreamer.” They’ve got one or two recurring events, but a whole lot of whitespace so they’re “free” (at least on paper) for long stretches of work.

The problem is that both of these are terrible. For their own reasons.

 

Being over-scheduled leaves us no time for ourselves. The more “in control” we are of our calendar, the less control we feel like we have over our lives. Not to mention we’re notoriously bad at knowing how long tasks take us to do. When your schedule is this jammed, even going 15 minutes over on your morning task will throw your whole day out of whack.

 

And the minimalist? Well, they’re just living in la la land, aren’t they? They’ve offloaded their schedule to some other format–most likely a to-do list, scheduling app, or series of angry emails asking “Where is this?”

 

A good daily schedule is a blueprint for a successful life. Knowing what we’re doing and when empowers us with a sense of purpose, meaning, and focus.


Via The Learning Factor
David Stapleton's insight:
Being over-scheduled leaves us no time for ourselves.
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 6, 5:47 PM

Don’t fall prey to under or over-scheduling.

Harish Kumar's curator insight, February 8, 6:59 AM
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