Water Ownership
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India-Pakistan Border Dam

India-Pakistan Border Dam | Water Ownership | Scoop.it

Caption: In the Kishanganga rush region near the India-Pakistan border, a dam is being built to divert the water back into India as soon it is about to flow into Pakistan.

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My scoop on water ownership

My own scoop on water ownership

The issue of water ownership is rather quite self-explanatory. The heart of this dilemma lies in the question, who owns the water? In the minds of most people, water is a human right that every person should have safe access to. However, what dictates where this water comes from? As country, state, and city lines have become clearer this issue has progressed to the point of “water wars” taking place over which area has access to a particular waterway. Having the right to water and owning it are two very different things. Even though everyone may have the right to water, its ownership is debatable. This creates problems for governments trying to set regulations on water usage and distribution for their respective countries.

The California Water Wars are a clear example of how water ownership can lead to huge problems. With the growth of Los Angeles as a large city, a bigger water supply became necessary. To provide the city with the water it needed, city officials decided to diverge the water via aqueduct from Owens Lake. The water, however, in Owens Lake was needed for the farmers in Owens Valley for agricultural purposes. This caused protest from the farmers there who obviously needed the water for their crops. Owens Lake was completely dry due to water divergence by 1926. So all in all, who actually had the right to this water? Water is a human right, but did the water in Owens Lake belong to the farmers or the city of Los Angeles?

To solve this issue, an economic alternative is available. Water ownership could be privatized. This means that large corporations could be given the option to compete for the right to sell water. This free enterprise system would allow water to be bought and sold as property.

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Legal status and ownership of the Sub-Saharan water utilities

Legal status and ownership of the Sub-Saharan water utilities | Water Ownership | Scoop.it

These pie graphs show the distribution of how water utilities are owned and their legal status regarding the Sub-Sahara region.

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Editorial: Good faith key to resolving water dispute - Politics - NZ Herald News

Editorial: Good faith key to resolving water dispute - Politics - NZ Herald News | Water Ownership | Scoop.it

The New Zealand government, on September 18th, met with leaders of Tainui in order to make a deal concerning the partial privatization of the Mighty River Power.  It was suggested that the iwi should put off the meeting in order to first create a pan-tribal group that would create a union against the government, but other iwi leaders explicitly declined to this for fear of being voted down by the government.  This helps to provide the perspective that not only is the water claim a dispute over water ownership, but it also provides a view into the tensions between tribal authority and populism.  

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Ohakuri Dam

Ohakuri Dam | Water Ownership | Scoop.it

Caption: In New Zealand, The Mighty River Power claims rights to the water in the the Ohakuri Dam on the Waikato River.

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ODT: tread carefully on water | Your Dunedin

ODT: tread carefully on water | Your Dunedin | Water Ownership | Scoop.it

The government in New Zealand claims that no one own water in the law, yet they proceed in consulting in the possibility of the Mighty River being up for sale.  It is thought by the government that these share offerings will not jeopardize the recognition of the rights and interests that Maori have in water; however, citizens who believe that water is an unalienable right are outraged.  It is thought that in light of this issue surrounding water ownership, there is the potential for a split socially in New Zealand. 

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Thirsty South Asia's river rifts threaten water wars

Thirsty South Asia's river rifts threaten water wars | Water Ownership | Scoop.it

In South Asia, India and Pakistan have a growing tension surrounding the water, given that Pakistan relies on the Himalayan rivers for almost everything water related.  With environmental factors such as climate change, and growing populations, the availability of water is crucial.  Pakistan has been going through dry spells, with many negative effects like hospitals having to delay surgeries, and even one town running out of water altogether, and they are blaming India and the dams that India has been installing to control the flow of water.  The blame, however, might not be best directed at India but rather should be pointed at Pakistan itself.  Inefficient ways of managing water cause millions of gallons to be lost daily.  Instead of pointing fingers, it may be better to take a look at the way things are being run first in order to avoid disputes.

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