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Brian Eno on Creating Music and Art As Imaginary Landscapes (1989)

Brian Eno on Creating Music and Art As Imaginary Landscapes (1989) | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
Brian Eno: record producer, visual artist, collaborator with the likes of U2 and David Bowie, ambient music-inventing musician, self-proclaimed...
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A Room for London | Hearts of Darkness: David Byrne

A Room for London | Hearts of Darkness: David Byrne | walk to unpick | Scoop.it

“I brought along some field recording gear to use while I was staying in the lovely pod/room/boat. I went out during the day and recorded sounds that I thought might be useful and evocative. It turned out that most of the sounds—even the church organ in Southwark Cathedral—seemed to converge around a common rhythm. It’s a bit too good to be true—that every large city should have its own rhythm, but here it is. I let the sounds dictate the groove, the tempo, and then I simply played along.”

 

via http://www.iainsinclair.org.uk/

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What is Story Map?

What is Story Map? | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
An attempt to map the entire world, alphabetically, in a day. To name every country in its own language, and to collect a story for every country, and to place it, correctly, on the map, from memory....
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About | Wasteland Twinning

About | Wasteland Twinning | walk to unpick | Scoop.it

Urban wastelands are at the centre of conflicts around cultural, economic and historical hegemonies. The common notion still remains that wastelands are of no value until developed. However these types of spaces hold a unique and valuable role in the future of humanity as we question notions of progress and strive for more sustainable models of living. Urban wastelands support inner city biodiversity, provide carbon sinks, improve hydrological attenuation, provide open space and represent freedom from the controlled built environment. As metaphors wastelands typify the cause and effect of our constant (re)development.

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Phillips de Pury & Company: CINDY SHERMAN, Untitled (#196)

Phillips de Pury & Company: CINDY SHERMAN, Untitled (#196) | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
Lot 12, CINDY SHERMAN, Untitled (#196), 1989...
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Anatomy of the Dandy

Anatomy of the Dandy | walk to unpick | Scoop.it

1. Physical distinction

 

Dandyism can only be painted on a suitable canvas. It is impossible to cut a dandy figure without being tall, slender and handsome, or having at least one of those characteristics to a high degree while remaining at least average in the other two. Fred Astaire was neither tall nor handsome, but he was “so thin you could spit through him.”

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George Sand: An Amazing Woman

George Sand: An Amazing Woman | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
To protest the unequal treatment accorded to women, George usually wore men's suits: shirt, pants, jacket, tie, top hat... the whole deal.
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Hannah Nicklin » Introducing… #Dust.

Hannah Nicklin » Introducing… #Dust. | walk to unpick | Scoop.it

We wanted to push the idea of stories you walk by, of moments and fragments forgotten, floating around a city (Motes…). We’re going to make a device for you to listen to them. But it will also challenge the interface of the headphone piece, it will be tactile and awkward and breakable and intimate. There will be some things never found. You will scan the city from above, and then search its streets below.

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Liminality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Liminality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | walk to unpick | Scoop.it

The spatial dimension of liminality can include specific places, larger zones or areas, or entire countries and larger regions.[114] Liminal places can range from borders and frontiers to no man's lands and disputed territories, to crossroads to perhaps airports or hotels, which people pass through but do not live in: arguably indeed all 'romantic travel enacts the three stages that characterize liminality: separation, marginalization, and reaggregation'.[115] In mythology and religion or esoteric lore liminality can include such realms as Purgatory or Da'at, which, as well as signifying liminality, some theologians deny actually existing, making them, in some cases, doubly liminal. "Between-ness" defines these spaces. For a hotel worker (an insider) or a person passing by with disinterest (a total outsider), the hotel would have a very different connotation. To a traveller staying there, the hotel would function as a liminal zone, just as 'doors and windows and hallways and gates frame...the definitively liminal condition'.[116]

 

Examples in fiction include the Interzone, the Wood between the Worlds and, as mentioned, The Twilight Zone (1959). In this television series, the Twilight Zone does not appear as an actual literal location, making it both a place and not a place at the same time, and therefore also doubly liminal. Similarly, on the television show Lost, the Island is revealed to be in liminal space, constantly shifting through spacetime while being physically rooted somewhere in the South Pacific Ocean.

It has been suggested that of itself 'the Internet...creates a natural environment for liminality: a place separate from one's space where the ordinary norms of everyday life easily may be suspended'.[117]

 

More conventionally, springs, caves, shores, rivers, volcanic calderas - 'a huge crater of an extinct volcano...[as] another symbol of transcendence'[118] - fords, passes, crossroads, bridges, and marshes are all liminal: '"edges", borders or faultlines between the legitimate and the illegitimate'.[119] Oedipus (an adoptee and therefore liminal) met his father at the crossroads and killed him; the bluesman Robert Johnson met the devil at the crossroads, where he is said to have sold his soul. Major transformations occur at crossroads and other liminal places, at least partly because liminality—being so unstable—can pave the way for access to esoteric knowledge or understanding of both sides. Liminality is sacred, alluring, and dangerous.

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Fallt Publishing | Invisible Cities | Janek Schaefer | London

'Recorded Delivery' is a sound activated tape recording of parcel travelling through the post office system from Exhibition Road, London to the room of the original installation in the Acorn Self Storage Centre, Wembley, London.

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Ultra-red: Sounding The Naked City

Our central idea is that of the construction of situations, that is to say, the concrete construction of momentary ambiences of life and their transformation into a superior passional quality. We must develop a methodical intervention based on the complex factors of two components in perpetual interaction, the material environment of life and the comportments which it gives rise to and which radically transform it.


Guy E. Debord, "Report on the Construction of Situations" (1957)1

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The Poet and the Prostitute: the search for female subjectivity | Six impossible things before breakfast

The Poet and the Prostitute: the search for female subjectivity | Six impossible things before breakfast | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
The flâneur responds to the spectacle created by the massive changes of the nineteenth century’s industrial innovation. As a response to the modern urban world, of increasingly fragmented and perceived insignificance, flânerie and the art of biography offer a realm of concrete subjectivity. Griselda Pollack comments that the figure of the flâneur “symbolises the privilege or freedom to move about the public arenas of the city observing but never interacting, consuming the sights through a controlling but rarely acknowledged gaze, directed as much at other people as the goods for sale. The flâneur embodies the gaze of modernity which is both covetous and erotic.”[5] The wandering practice of the flâneur in this perspective, positions itself at the juncture of modernity and the pleasure derived from looking, scopophilia.

 

 

There has been much debate over even the concept of the female flâneur. The term for female flâneur in its German usage is “Flaneuse” which has been criticised for suggesting as Anke Gleber states, “what is “typically” female, is associated with “necessarily” menial occupations such as those of the Friseuse [female hairdresser] or Masseuse [female massage worker], the latter carrying contingent suggestive and discriminatory conations.”[6] While the flâneur loitered on the streets observing the urban spectacle unobserved himself, some critics believe that the female flâneur could not exist or if it did the female form of flânerie was prostitution, as Professor Susan Buck Morss argues “if women roamed the street they became “streetwalkers” prostitutes, carnal commodities on sale alongside other items in the arcade. Women were objects for consumption, objects for the gaze of the flâneur, or the poet who like, Baudelaire, would notice women as mere passerby, all women who loitered risked being seen as whores” [7].

 

So whilst men were exploring the spaces of modernity and the spectacle of the city, the female experience of this comes from a place of exclusion. The marginalisation of the female experience, of the female flâneur, was in direct relation to the social construct of the “fallen woman” as an unchaperoned woman in a public domain. This is not to say there were no female artists, however artists such as Berthe Morisot and Mary Cassatt were restricted to spaces for ladies such as the park, theatre (spectator in the circle or balcony), garden and domestic spaces. Whilst Édouard Manet and Pierre-Auguste Renoir who lived in Paris at same time had free access to create images from all of the above spaces as well as backstage at the theatre, cafes, the street, music halls and brothels, which were regarded as the sphere of fallen women. It was this restriction to the urban space that female writer/poet and artist (necessarily middle class as these titles assert the privilege of education) was unable to freely observe and participate in the forming of the new metropolis.
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Gender Forum: Cultural Bastards:

14In terms of gendered behavior, the flâneur's sexualized penetration of the urban sphere and his detached and ironically objectified gaze may be considered masculine, whereas his writings, his sketches and tableaux, being the focal point of his gaze, are traditionally gendered feminine.[5] But there have also been female flâneurs like George Sand, Renée Vivien, and Djuna Barnes, which leads to the question whether the traditional notion that the flâneur roaming the streets untouched applies for women as well. Obviously, no is the answer here, since, as Jane Rendell notes, "the figure of the public woman […] represents the blurring of public and private boundaries, and the uncontrollable movement of women and female sexuality" (88). George Sand, for example, remained "untouched" as long as she was cross-dressed as a dandy, claiming "my clothes feared nothing […]. No one knew me, no one looked at me, no one found fault with me […]" (qtd. in Munt 116). This simulacrum of a flâneur may be, as Sally Munt argues, a "roving signifier" and as such "contribute to the unfixing of the supremacy of the heterosexual male gaze in urban spatial theory" (117). But one may also claim that woman can only be a flâneur as a transvestite and thus must rely on an "indeterminate sexuality, trapped in transliteration, caught in desire" (Munt 117).

 

 

 

15 The transgression of the female flâneur is her claim to spatial mobility. She may not be biologically male, but her gaze is considered to enact masculine visual privilege. Leaving her traditionally ascribed female-private space of domesticity to enter the male-public sphere turns the female flâneur into a figure of excess. This notion of woman as excess is even heightened when appropriated by the butch lesbian flâneur, because, as Munt points out, "[s]waggering down the street in her butch drag casting her roving eye left and right, the lesbian flâneur signifies a mobilised female sexuality in control, not out of control" (121). Breaking down clear distinctions between masculinity and femininity, the lesbian flâneur poses a threat to heteronormativity, "hence the jeering shout 'Is it a man or is it a woman?' is a cry of anxiety, as much as aggression" (Munt 121). On the one hand then, female flâneuring is a liberating accomplishment; on the other hand, it lacks the protection of the home and can thus turn into encountering a gendered urban war zone. Oscillating between empowerment and failure, the lesbian flâneur becomes vulnerable and susceptible to instable place designations.
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Dark Waters

Dark Waters | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
Dark Waters features maps of buried tributaries, interviews, and original written content about the history of London's River Thames.
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art people place: Riverlands

art people place: Riverlands | walk to unpick | Scoop.it

The national premiere of a performance by poet Jo Bell and storyteller Jo Blake Cave.
Inspired by their journey along the Nene in the footsteps of nature writer BB, this hour-long performance brings you atmosphere, mesmerising stories, humour and humanity.

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SPACE / SCAPE Project » About

SPACE/SCAPE is a project division of KUNCI Cultural Studies Center which is maintained as a critical engagement with ways of thinking around our contemporary conditions of space as forms of social practices. The conceptual-practical natures of this exploration weave through various issues ranging from architecture, geography, urbanism to experience of everyday life, with strong emphasis on collaborative approaches, open circulations, and knowledge-sharing processes.

 

As its pilot project, in 2009 SPACE/SCAPE held a collaborative research, which gathered trandisciplinary individuals/groups in an intensive period of time to explore together and co-produce the meanings, ideas and practices in Alun-alun,Yogyakarta. The endeavor had culminated in a successful publication, a series of event-holdings, and created some critical dialogues across temporal and geographical boundaries. The next step in this itinerary is by continuing the project as a common platform for dialogue and exchange with other local contexts of space while widening its scope beyond.

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Love Songs - Mary Kelly

The works that make up the Love Songs project remix images and accounts of the 1970s Women’s Movement from Mary Kelly’s archive. Flashing Nipple Remix uses time-exposed photographs to capture three moments from a re-enactment by younger performers of the 1971 Miss World protest at the Albert Hall in London. WLM Demo Remix projects a film-loop with a slow dissolve to create a bridge between past and present representations of the 1970 Women’s Liberation demonstration in New York, which marked the 50th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment. In the centre of the room, Multi-Story House illuminates, and allows visitors to step inside, the intergenerational dialogue about the historic ‘moment’ of activism. The Love Songs series asks what, if anything, is passed on from one generation to the next. Rather than a nostalgic evocation of the 70s, the works synthesize past and present, exploring the ongoing investment of the artist and performers in both the history and current relevance of sexual politics.
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The Dandy Portraits: The Lives of Exquisite Gentlemen Today by Rose Callahan

The Dandy Portraits: The Lives of Exquisite Gentlemen Today by Rose Callahan | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
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George Sand & Friend

George Sand & Friend | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
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THAMES MUDLARKING IN LONDON

THAMES MUDLARKING IN LONDON | walk to unpick | Scoop.it
THAMES MUDLARKER'S SHOW YOU 8000 PICTURE'S OF TREASURE'S AND FIND'S FROM THE THAMES 4-SHORE.
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“SOUND OF THE CITY,” a sound + visual installation capturing SHANGHAI & HANGZHOU by LOU NANLI (aka: B6) /// NeochaEDGE ///

“SOUND OF THE CITY,” a sound + visual installation capturing SHANGHAI & HANGZHOU by LOU NANLI (aka: B6) /// NeochaEDGE /// | walk to unpick | Scoop.it

Sound of the City is a recent sound and visual installation from Shanghai-based Lou Nanli (aka: B6)

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Gender Differences in the Urban Environment The flâneur and flâneuse of the 21st Century

 

To research gender differences in perception of the historical city, a type that explores the city, the flâneur is used. Flânerie means: watching people and being watched, but just that definition wouldn't be adequate and would do the flâneur injustice. This character is a paradox itself, he likes to be secluded

from the mass, then he would like to be part of the mass, he wants quietness and then liveliness.


The flâneur has a female version, the flâneuse. Among the critics, the existence of the flâneuse is debatable. Writers like Janet Wolf and Virginia Pollock claim that she can't exist, because she can't show the same behavior as the flâneur, wandering aimlessly around town. As stated by Deborah
Parsons and Anne Friedberg, the flâneuse does exist, but in a different form then the flâneur. The flâneuse was simply not noticed by male history writers.

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One-Way Street: The Female Flâneur

One-Way Street: The Female Flâneur | walk to unpick | Scoop.it

Zambreno isn't the first person to wonder what a female flâneur would look like. Gender studies scholars have thoroughly examined the gender politics of this quintessentially male figure. The flâneur is both spectacle and spectre, at one with the crowd and set off from it. For the female flâneur the dynamics of the gaze get shifted, but the shifting pleasures of flâneurie are (almost) equally available to women.

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New Left Review - Elizabeth Wilson: The Invisible Flaneur

The relationship of women to cities has long preoccupied reformers and philanthropists. [1] In recent years the preoccupation has been inverted: the Victorian determination to control working-class women has been replaced by a feminist concern for women’s safety and comfort in city streets. But whether women are seen as a problem of cities, or cities as a problem for women, the relationship remains fraught with difficulty. With the intensification of the public/private divide in the industrial period, the presence of women on the streets and in public places of entertainment caused enormous anxiety, and was the occasion for any number of moralizing and regulatory discourses. In fact, the fate and position of women in the city was a special case of a more general alarm and ambivalence which stretched across the political spectrum. It is true that some—predominantly liberals— expressed an optimistic and excited response to the urban spectacle. Perhaps not surprisingly, those who stood to gain most from industrial urbanization were the ones that praised it most strongly: the new entrepreneurs, the rising bourgeois class. For them the cities—above all the great city, the metropolis—offered an unprecedented and astonishing variety of possibilities, stimuli and wealth. The development of a consumer and spectacular society on a scale not previously known represented opportunities for progress, plenty and a more educated and civilized populace. [2]

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