Visualization Techniques and Practice
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Visualization Techniques and Practice
How to use visualization techniques for nonprofits in areas like data analysis, learning, facilitation, and innovation
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How to Make an Infographic Worth a Thousand Words

How to Make an Infographic Worth a Thousand Words | Visualization Techniques and Practice | Scoop.it

As the old saying goes about pictures being "worth a thousand words," so goes the story about infographics.


Infographics are a compelling way to represent complex information quickly and clearly. In an infographic, visual symbols and numbers are used with colors, fonts, and labels to make the data more useful. With the flood of information and exponential data points, it is imperative to focus people's attention on not just the valuable data, but the implications as well.

Storytelling is using a linear narrative to guide people- as the creative and performance marketing communities work together to make sense of data, we must not squander the opportunity that this format provides. We need to create meaningful infographics that minimize information anxiety by conveying the perspective in the most effective manner. Agencies are tasked with providing creative expressions that connect target audiences with meaningful content -- and infographics are by no means any different.

Visit the complete article to learn more about the fundamental factors that contribute to successful infographics:..


Via Lauren Moss
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Why Infographics Are Visual Thinking

Why Infographics Are Visual Thinking | Visualization Techniques and Practice | Scoop.it

Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org


Another way to articulate the importance of sense-making.


Think about it this way: Tools are not always actual objects designed to help us with physical activities. A notebook, whether it is a Moleskine or an Evernote digital document, is a tool that expands our memory. A digital calculator, whether it is an inexpensive machine bought in the nearest Dollar Tree or an app downloaded to your iPhone, frees you from the burden of having to retain and execute many complex mathematical algorithms. Non-physical tools (or sets of tools and practices), such as statistics and the scientific method, evolved to let us gaze beyond what we would normally see, and to overcome our deepest biases and lazy habits of mind. The same is true for great visual displays of information...


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2012 Winners of the Information is Beautiful awards

2012 Winners of the Information is Beautiful awards | Visualization Techniques and Practice | Scoop.it

On September 27th, the world's best examples of visually stunning information was recognized at the inaugural Information is Beautiful awards.

The event, held at London's Institute of Contemporary Arts, awarded designers from all over the world in a variety of categories, including data visualisation, infographics and data journalism.

When David McCandless, author, data journalist and founder of the IIB data-visualisation studio, announced in early 2012 that IIB was looking for award applicants, he was inundated with over 1,000 entries.

"I've just been amazed by the sheer quality of the creative work submitted to the awards from around the world," McCandless told Wired.co.uk. "There are a number of criteria we look for when judging these awards. Not only do they have to have the right visual quality and be easily understood, they have to have that invisible element of story telling as well."


Read the complete article for a closer look at all the winners, selected by a panel of judges including musician and visual artist Brian Eno, senior curator of the Museum of Modern Art Paola Antonelli, BrainPickings.org editor Maria Popova and Guardian Datablog editor Simon Rogers.


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