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Op-Ed: Arts Education Is Critical to Student Success - TakePart

Op-Ed: Arts Education Is Critical to Student Success - TakePart | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
TakePart Op-Ed: Arts Education Is Critical to Student Success TakePart It states, “Art education opens the possibility for creating new worlds, rather than simply accepting the world as it is…students learn a great deal in high-quality visual arts...
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A personal thought on photography, art, biology and science | Society of Biology blog

A personal thought on photography, art, biology and science | Society of Biology blog | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
Last year's Society of Biology photography competition winner discusses visual art, science and entries to the 2012 competition entitled How Biology Can Save the World (A personal thought on photography, art, biology and science

Via Amanda McDonald Crowley
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Scientific Illustration Tumblr

Scientific Illustration Tumblr | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

Draw like a scientist! Great collection of truly inspiring images about science and nature by @lukaslarge

 

“As art reflects culture, scientific illustration reflects the findings of science and technology.  Scientific illustration takes the viewer to the often unobservable - from molecules and viruses to the universe, from depiction of the internal anatomy of arthropods and plants to geologic cross sections and reconstruction of extinct life forms, ranging from realistic to abstract portrayal. Shapes, anatomy, details, and concepts that cannot be conveyed with words form the essence of this art. […] Science illustrators are artists in the service of science. They use scientifically informed observation, combined with technical and aesthetic skills to accurately portray a subject. Accuracy and communication are essential. The skilled scientific illustrator can clarify multiple focal depths and overlapping layers, emphasize important details, and reconstruct broken specimens on paper - results unattainable through photography. Structure and detail may be depicted with cutaway drawings, transparencies, and exploded diagrams. Many steps may be required to achieve accuracy.” http://www.gnsi.org/science-illustration


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Microbiology: Bacterial communities as capitalist economies

Microbiology: Bacterial communities as capitalist economies | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

Tracking the behaviour of bacteria as they group together on a surface reveals a 'rich-get-richer' mechanism in which polysaccharide deposition and cellular location amplify in a positive feedback loop.


Via Laran, Sakis Koukouvis
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These gorgeous medical illustrations look like scenes from another world

These gorgeous medical illustrations look like scenes from another world | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
When viewed from a new angle, a different scale, or in a slightly different light, even something as familiar as the human body can look utterly alien.

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Hospital reports more patients with antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Hospital reports more patients with antibiotic-resistant bacteria | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

"Artwork of bacterial cells becoming resistant to antibiotics. This resistance is acquired from a donor cell's plasmid (circular unit of deoxyribonucleic acid, DNA), which has resistance seen at upper left (red/yellow, red is resistance). Viral transmission involves a virus (pink, lower left) obtaining a resistant gene, and passing it to a bacterial cell that incorporates it into its plasmid. Bacterial cells also acquire segments of DNA released from dead cells (upper left). Mutations (not seen) may also occur, which may be antibiotic resistant and thus allow the bacteria to survive and reproduce.

© Bryson Biomedical Illustrations / Custom Medical Stock Photo -

South Shore Regional Hospital's experiencing another flare-up of cases of patients contracting an antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
The hospital's fourth-floor medical unit, the same area where problems were found in September, is where nine cases of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) have been detected over the last couple of weeks.

"We've instituted a lot of the similar precautions although it's not at the point where we'd be closing the unit to visitors or restricting admissions," said registered nurse Elizabeth Watson, one of South Shore Health's infection control practitioners.

"It's disappointing but not entirely unexpected because we identified a number of issues during the last outbreak and it takes awhile for those recommendations, especially ones that have lofty work or money associated with them, to get changed so it takes time to address them."..."

Back in September the health district limited access to the unit when about 20 patients tested positive for MRSA. High-level efforts to contain, control and eradicate the bacteria's presence, such as the use of special soap to clean patients, translated to temporary delays in non-essential services, patient admissions and transfers.

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American Medical Botany - published 1817

American Medical Botany - published 1817 | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

"Being a collection of the native medicinal plants of the United States, containing their botanical, history and chemical analysis, and properties and uses, in medicine, diet and the arts, with coloured engravings. By Joseph Bigelow, MD" (http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/21877#page/7/mode/1up)

 

Old botany books are so beautiful with the hand coloured drawings, and digitization means that everybody can enjoy them. I've been looking through this nearly 200 year old volume while working on the upcoming teaching tool about medicinal plants. Thanks to the biodiversity heritage library for sharing these lovely objects (http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/)


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Rules devised for building artificial protein molecules from scratch

Rules devised for building artificial protein molecules from scratch | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

By following certain rules, scientists can prepare architectural plans for building artificial protein molecules not found in the real world. Based on these computer renditions, previously non-existent proteins can be produced from scratch in the lab. The principles to make this happen have now been elucidated in detail.


Dr. Nobuyasu Koga and Dr. Rie Tatsumi-Koga, a husband-and-wife scientific team in Dr. David Baker's lab at the University of Washington Protein Design Institute led the effort. The project benefited from hundreds of thousands of computer enthusiasts around the world who adopted Rosetta@home for simulating designed proteins. In this project, protein molecules start as an unstable, high energy chain of amino acids. This chain then begins folding into various shapes to try to achieve a stable, low energy state. The end result is its distinctive molecular structure.

 

Rosetta@home volunteers helped the project team to plot this energy landscape from protein structure predictions. "The structural options become fewer as the interactions that stabilize the protein selectively favor one folding pattern over others," explained Koga. "This decline in conformation options to eventually achieve a unique, ordered structure is called a funnel-shaped energy landscape," he said, drawing a tornado-like figure on a whiteboard. The researchers came up with guidelines for robustly generating this type of energy landscape.

 

According to Tatsumi-Koga, these rules require the interactions among the residues in the protein's amino acid chain to consistently favor the same folded conformation in forming its molecular shape. This is made possible, for example, by defining whether a specific unit will form a "right-handed" orientation or its mirror image, and disfavor others. The researchers, she said, synthesized the proteins they had originally designed and tested "in silico" (on the computer) and physically characterized them through "in vitro" (laboratory test tube) experiments. They also compared the molecular structures of the computer models with these laboratory-derived proteins to see how well they matched. Koga stressed that the project looked strictly at protein structure. He smiled as he said his group was striving toward a "platonic ideal," a reference to Plato's theory of perfect forms. During this project, the researchers achieved a library of five ideal structures, but since filing their report have added several more. To make them accessible to other scientists, the designs have been deposited in the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics and the lab analysis of their chemical structure was put in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Database.


The team was not attempting to create specific new proteins that could carry out particular activities. However, their design principles and methods, according to their report, should allow the ready creation of a wide range of robust, stable, building blocks for the next generation of engineered functional proteins. Such proteins would be custom-made for the task, instead of repurposed from proteins with unrelated functions. The hope is that engineered proteins will be useful for drug and vaccine development, especially for formidable viruses like HIV or rapidly changing ones, like the flu. Proteins designed to exact specifications might also prove therapeutically useful in cleaving mutated genes, and for speeding up chemical reactions important in industry and environmental reclamation.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ronan Delisle's curator insight, October 21, 2014 5:39 AM

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Beautiful "flowers" self-assemble in a beaker — Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Beautiful "flowers" self-assemble in a beaker — Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
Elaborate nanostructures blossom from a chemical reaction perfected at Harvard

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Infusing arts in schools - Squamish Chief

Infusing arts in schools - Squamish Chief | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
Infusing arts in schools
Squamish Chief
The new initiative aims to bring creative thinking into science, mathematics and other courses, Thomson said.
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Worlds Within Worlds: Incredible Nano Images Invisible to the Naked Eye #art #photography #science

Worlds Within Worlds: Incredible Nano Images Invisible to the Naked Eye #art #photography #science | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Bio-Art: Scientist Creates Photographs in a Petri Dish

Bio-Art: Scientist Creates Photographs in a Petri Dish | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
What happens when the worlds of art and science merge? In the case of these brilliant images from microbiologist come artist Zachary Copfer, the result is some surprisingly different photography.

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Algae Science Images | Science Images from PSmicrographs

Algae Science Images | Science Images from PSmicrographs | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
Online library of photographs and coloured scanning electron micrographs of algae.

Via Alessio Erioli
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STEAM Ahead: Merging Arts and Science Education...

STEAM Ahead: Merging Arts and Science Education... | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
At Wolf Trap's Institute of Education, they are trying something different by incorporating art with math and science.
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Adam Martinakis - Digital 3D Visual Artist

Adam Martinakis - Digital 3D Visual Artist | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
The art works of digital 3d visual artist Adam Martinakis

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Spongelab | A Global Science Community - with science animation, images, games & more

Spongelab | A Global Science Community - with science animation, images, games & more | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
Spongelab is an online learning platform with science animations, images, videos and games integrated into a teacher content management system.

...


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Anatomia Collection - University of Toronto Libraries

Anatomia Collection - University of Toronto Libraries | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

This collection features approximately 4500 full page plates and other significant illustrations of human anatomy selected from the Jason A. Hannah and Academy of Medicine collections in the history of medicine at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto. Each illustration has been fully indexed using medical subject headings (MeSH), and techniques of illustration, artists, and engravers have been identified whenever possible. There are ninety-five individual titles represented, ranging in date from 1522 to 1867.

 


Via Shannon Marie Robinson
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Polygon Medical Animation - Medical Illustration

Polygon Medical Animation - Medical Illustration | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

Polygon creates custom 3D medical animation and illustrations for visual communication, publication, trade shows and events. Effectively communicate your product message and awareness.

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Insane art formed by carving books with surgical tools

Insane art formed by carving books with surgical tools | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

Using knives, tweezers and surgical tools, Brian Dettmer carves one page at a time. Nothing inside the out-of-date encyclopedias, medical journals, illustration books, or dictionaries is relocated or implanted, only removed.

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(EN) - Plant Encyclopedia to Identify Plants, Flowers, Trees & More | botany.com

(EN) - Plant Encyclopedia to Identify Plants, Flowers, Trees & More | botany.com | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

"Botany.com: A complete resource for plant and gardening information, an encyclopedia of plants with detailed descriptions and tips for potting, growing, propagation and species varieties ..."


Via Stefano KaliFire
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Saturn's Moon Titan Glows in the Dark

Saturn's Moon Titan Glows in the Dark | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
Further study of the glow could shed light on the complex chemical reactions going on in Titan's atmosphere...

Via No Such Thing As The News
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Maya Lin Studio

Maya Lin Studio | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

"Landscape is the context and the source of inspiration for Ms. Lin's art. She peers curiously at the landscape through a twenty-first century lens, merging rational and technological order with notions of beauty and the transcendental. Utilizing technological methods to study and visualize the natural world, Ms. Lin takes micro and macro views of the earth, sonar resonance scans, aerial and satellite mapping devices and translates that information into sculptures, drawings and environmental installations. Her works address how we relate and respond to the environment, and presents new ways of looking at the world around us. [...] Ms. Lin has consistently explored how we experience the landscape. She has made works that merge completely with the terrain, blurring the boundaries between two- and three-dimensional space and set up a systematic ordering of the land tied to history, language, and time."

Maya Lin Studio


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Visionary Images: The Lost Fractals of Benoît Mandelbrot | Wired Science | Wired.com

Visionary Images: The Lost Fractals of Benoît Mandelbrot | Wired Science | Wired.com | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it

Many people know Benoît Mandelbrot from the computer screensavers of a pre-LCD era. Others have a deeper understanding of his mathematics, the repeating geometries that earned him the sobriquet Father of Fractals. Less appreciated, though, is the process underlying his work: Mandelbrot relied as much for guidance on visual imagery as whiteboard formulae. Primitive computer printouts were his maps to uncharted mathematical terrain, their dot-matrix patterns a "here be dragons" for the exploration of dynamical systems and chaos theory.

 

In 2008, fascinated by the interplay between imagery and scientific investigation, art historian Nina Samuel spent two weeks interviewing Mandelbrot in his Cambridge, Massachusetts home. After Mandelbrot passed away in 2010, she was allowed entry to his office, collecting some 300 printouts, sketches and notebook scribbles now on display in The Islands of Benoît Mandelbrot: Fractals, Chaos, and the Materiality of Thinking, an exhibition at the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan.

 

"There is such an organic quality to these images," said Samuel. "These are the images the scientists used when they were working, and not what was found on magazine covers or popularized in screensavers."

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Picturing science: sharing knowledge, selling ideas

Picturing science: sharing knowledge, selling ideas | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
Images of science can be used in different ways. They may be there to interest and help educate audiences, or to share observations and theoretical interpretations with colleagues.

Via Walter Wartenweiler
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The meaning of life › Photos (ABC Science)

The meaning of life › Photos (ABC Science) | Visual Arts & Science | Scoop.it
Science photographer Malcolm Ricketts' stunning images of plants and animals are the result of almost thirty years documenting the work of University of Sydney scientists.

 

The craft of scientific photography was very different when Malcolm Ricketts started work at Sydney University nearly 30 years ago.

"When I started I used a 4 x 5 inch camera, there were even still a few glass plates lying around that were in the stock.

"All the graphs and illustrations were all done by a school artist in Letraset, then photographed, then multiple copies made and sent off to the editors and reviewers.

 

"And the same for photographs. Everything was done in black and white," says Ricketts, who documents the work of scientists at the University's School of Biological Sciences.

 

Today, all Rickett's photographs — both general and photomicroscopy — are taken with digital cameras, and most photographs are in colour except those taken on electron microscopes, which are black and white and artificially coloured.

And while the physics of taking a photo hasn't changed, significant changes in microscopy techniques over the last decade have enabled plant and molecular scientists to capture cellular detail in high resolution using green fluorescent proteins. (See photo#2 and photo#10 in photo gallery above)

Information, information, information


Capturing a good scientific image is very different to taking commercial and artistic photographs that hit you between the eyes, says Ricketts, who studied photography at TAFE after completing a biology degree.

 

Detail is critical.

 

"The photographs back up what the scientists describe."

This work is especially important in areas such as fluorescence microscopy where scientists are identifying structures, chromosome banding, and work on gene signalling and silencing in tobacco plants by Professor Peter Waterhouse (See photo #2 in photo gallery).

 

"You're conveying the maximum information of what the person who wants the image is trying to obtain. So if its cellular detail you go for the maximum detail. You're not looking for that advertising interocular jolt unless you are producing a PR image."

 

"Ultimately you go for your information, your detail and your art and pleasantness of an image."

 

One of Rickett's favourite images of Sydney Harbour coral Plesiastrea versipora (See photo #4 in photo gallery) — illustrates his point. The coral is coloured green by algae, so it's not as conventially beautiful as other images (See photo #3 in the photogallery), but the shot focuses on a single polyp.

"It's similar to orange soft coral, but it's got a little bit more detail in it."

 

Capturing the moment


Photographing an image that reflects what the scientist is trying to illustrate takes patience, says Ricketts.

 

A great example of this is a photo of anarchist bees laying eggs in honeycomb cells (See photo #11 in photo gallery), which Ricketts took for Professor Ben Oldroyd, who studies bee behaviour.

 

"That's a four second opportunity over the space of four or five hours of just concentrating looking down the camera waiting for an anarchist bee to wander around, shove its bum into a honeycomb cell and lay an egg, and then it's gone."

 

But science photography is a dying craft, he says.

 

"The science these days doesn't need the pictures as much as it did in the past.

 

"More and more and more science is becoming so molecular that scientists have lots of other evidence to back up the story.

"There would be very few scientific photographers left."

 

Ricketts images appear as part of a new exhibition The Meaning of Life at the Macleay Museum which chronicles some of the Australia's most significant advances in the biological sciences in the last 50 years.

 

The exhibition is open until 8 March 2013.


Via Sue Tamani
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