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Liberian slums barricaded as ebola sets new record

Liberian slums barricaded as ebola sets new record | Virology News | Scoop.it
Riot police and soldiers acting on their president's orders used scrap wood and barbed wire to seal off 50,000 people inside their Liberian slum Wednesday, trying to contain the Ebola outbreak that has killed 1,350 people and counting across West...
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Virology News
Topical news snippets about viruses that affect people.  And other things. Like zombies B-)
Curated by Ed Rybicki
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Remember Last Year's [USA] Hepatitis A Outbreak? This Year It's So Much Worse.

Remember Last Year's [USA] Hepatitis A Outbreak? This Year It's So Much Worse. | Virology News | Scoop.it
Cases of the potentially deadly liver disease have nearly doubled as outbreaks spread nationwide.
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Africa Analysis: Capacity building in HIV vaccine R&D

Africa Analysis: Capacity building in HIV vaccine R&D | Virology News | Scoop.it
African scientists are spearheading HIV vaccine R&D but new investments are needed, writes Anatoli Kamali.
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Key Molecule for Flu Infection is Identified

Key Molecule for Flu Infection is Identified | Virology News | Scoop.it
Key Molecule for Flu Infection is Identified...
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Ebola vaccine provides protection and hope for high-risk communities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Ebola vaccine provides protection and hope for high-risk communities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo | Virology News | Scoop.it
It’s been ten days since Jean René* lost his brother to Ebola virus disease (EVD). "My brother’s wife has come to live with my family," said Jean René, who lives in a community about 20 kilometers north of Mbandaka, the first urban centre in the Democratic Republic of Congo to have confirmed cases of EVD during the current outbreak. Though mourning the loss of his brother, Jean René is comforted because his sister-in-law and the rest of his extended family have received the vaccine against Ebola. Since the family came in contact with a person with Ebola, they are considered at high risk of the disease and have participated in the ring vaccination, which has been taking place in Mbandaka since 21 May 2018.  "Ring vaccination is a new and vital tool in the control of Ebola," said Dr Michael Ryan, WHO Assistant Director-General, Emergency Preparedness and Response. "I just spent the day out with the vaccination teams in the community, and for the first time in my experience, I saw hope in the face of Ebola and not terror. This is a major milestone for global public health." The ring vaccination is led by the National Institute of Biomedical Research and the Ministry of Health of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which is working with a wide range of partners, including WHO, Médecins sans Frontières and UNICEF. Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, contributed funds towards the operational costs, and through an agreement with Merck, the vaccine developer, helped ensure that 300 000 investigational doses of the vaccine are available in case of an outbreak. The vaccination is being provided to the contacts of confirmed cases, and the contacts of contacts, as well as healthcare workers, front line responders and other people with potential exposure to Ebola. Transfer of Ebola response experience between Guinea and the Democratic Republic of the Congo comes full circle This vaccination effort is also the result of a major collaboration between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Republic of Guinea. In 2015, a ring vaccination trial took place in Guinea and found the vaccine to be highly effective against Ebola. Due to the results of the trial, the yet to be licensed rVSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine has been approved for ‘compassionate use’ in outbreaks. This means that although the vaccine has not yet been formally approved by a full regulatory process, there is no viable alternative and it has proven sufficiently safe and effective to be recommended for use. Dr Alhassane Toure coordinated the field operations of the Guinea trial, and now he is leading the efforts in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Guinean authorities gave their approval to loan more than 30 of the country’s health experts to the Democratic Republic of the Congo for the ring vaccination.  "I am here to help my brothers and friends in the Democratic Republic of Congo to fight against Ebola," said Dr Alhassane. "Ring vaccination can help stop the spread of the Ebola virus." Dr Alhassane and his team are working with 50 health workers from the Democratic Republic of the Congo to share the expertise they have in ring vaccination. In addition, Dr Ismaila Ibrahima Sani from Niger is coordinating the actions in the field. This transfer of knowledge and cooperation between Guinea and the Democratic Republic of the Congo has now come full circle. "I’m very proud because the Democratic Republic of the Congo sent a team to Guinea the year before last to support Guinea’s fight against Ebola, and now Guinea has sent vaccination experts to help them," said Professor Jean-Jacques Muyembe-Tamfum, Director-General of the National Institute for Biomedical Research. "This is a great example of south-to-south cooperation." Campaign expanding to remote affected areas In the past week, the teams have vaccinated more than 420 eligible people in rings around the four cases of Ebola which have been confirmed in Mbandaka. In addition, the vaccine has been offered to health care workers in the area. "It is possible that there will be new cases confirmed of Ebola in the city," said Ana Maria Henao-Restrepo from the Initiative for Vaccine Research at WHO. "However, it is reassuring to witness that the affected families and communities are accepting our teams and that they have been able to implement ring vaccination." Vaccination has begun in other areas of Equateur Province with confirmed cases of Ebola. On 28 May, ring vaccination began in Bikoro, which is 150 kilometres from the provincial capital. Later this week, vaccinators from Guinea and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are expected to start ring vaccination in Iboko health zone, which is the most remote of the three areas reporting confirmed cases. * name changed to protect privacy
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Brain Cancer Vaccine Effective in Some Patients

Brain Cancer Vaccine Effective in Some Patients | Virology News | Scoop.it
Researchers report a clinical trial of a personalized vaccine that targets glioblastoma brain cancer has successfully improved survival rates for patients.
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Cytomegalovirus establishes a latent reservoir and triggers long-lasting inflammation in the eye

Cytomegalovirus establishes a latent reservoir and triggers long-lasting inflammation in the eye | Virology News | Scoop.it
Author summary Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common viral pathogen which is highly prevalent, but does not cause clinical disease in hosts with a fully competent immune system. After infection the virus remains with the host life-long in a chronic and then latent state.
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How Durable Is the Hepatitis B Vaccine? 

How Durable Is the Hepatitis B Vaccine?  | Virology News | Scoop.it
Washington—About 85% of a cohort of Alaskans who received the hepatitis B vaccine at age 6 months or older showed evidence of protection after 35 … Continue reading →...
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Protect our boys from HPV related cancers

Hi, I'm Jamie. After surviving throat cancer caused by HPV I founded the Throat Cancer Foundation, a national charity that campaigns for HPV vaccination for both boys and girls.#ourboysdeservebetter...
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Effectiveness of influenza vaccine during pregnancy in preventing hospitalizations and outpatient visits for respiratory illness in pregnant women ... - PubMed - NCBI

Effectiveness of influenza vaccine during pregnancy in preventing hospitalizations and outpatient visits for respiratory illness in pregnant women ... - PubMed - NCBI | Virology News | Scoop.it
Am J Perinatol. 2004 Aug;21(6):333-9.
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MIT team develops single-injection polymer vaccine for polio

MIT team develops single-injection polymer vaccine for polio | Virology News | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US have developed a new single-injection vaccine that can carry...Read More...
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Ebola Claims Two More Lives in Congo as Vaccinations Under Way

Ebola Claims Two More Lives in Congo as Vaccinations Under Way | Virology News | Scoop.it
A nurse treating the deadly contagious disease has died.
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Flu vaccine shortage hits Canberra following record demand

Flu vaccine shortage hits Canberra following record demand | Virology News | Scoop.it
A national shortage of the flu vaccine has hit the ACT with ACT Health staff working to redistribute stock to ensure it goes to those with the greatest need.The shortage …...
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U.S. biotechs to speed work on Nipah vaccine as virus hits India 

U.S. biotechs to speed work on Nipah vaccine as virus hits India  | Virology News | Scoop.it
A global coalition set up a year ago to fight epidemics has struck a $25 million deal with two U.S. biotech companies to accelerate work on a vaccine against the brain-damaging Nipah virus that has killed 12 people in India.
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Endogenous retroviruses of non-avian/mammalian vertebrates illuminate diversity and deep history of retroviruses

Endogenous retroviruses of non-avian/mammalian vertebrates illuminate diversity and deep history of retroviruses | Virology News | Scoop.it
Author summary Retroviruses infect a wide range of vertebrates and cause many diseases, such as AIDS and cancers. To date, retroviruses have been rarely characterized in vertebrates other than mammals and birds, impeding our understanding of the diversity and early evolution of retroviruses.
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Ask a CDC Scientist: Dr. Terrence Tumpey and the Reconstruction of the 1918 Pandemic Virus | Pandemic Influenza (Flu) | CDC

Ask a CDC Scientist: Dr. Terrence Tumpey and the Reconstruction of the 1918 Pandemic Virus | Pandemic Influenza (Flu) | CDC | Virology News | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know about the flu illness, including symptoms, treatment and prevention.
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Are you travelling to Europe - Think Measles

Measles Measles outbreaks continue in Europe. Since 1 January 2018, the highest number of measles cases in the EU were in Greece (1,008), Romania (757), France (429) and Italy (164). Seven deaths have been reported from 4 countries – Romania (3), Italy (2), Greece (1) and France (1). Measles cases continue to occur in Ireland. Since January 2018 there is an on-going outbreak of measles in the Mid West with over 20 cases. In October 2017, more than 10 cases of measles occurred in North Dublin and in the North East. Visit our hot topic for more information. There was a national outbreak in 2016. This involved 40 cases occurring in the South, the South East, the North East, the East and the Midwest. Most cases had not had MMR vaccine. Measles is a highly infectious virus. The main features are fever, cough, red and painful eyes, and a rash. It can cause severe disease resulting in complications such as pneumonia and encephalitis and occasionally death. Although it is most common in young children, it can affect anyone at any age. Vaccination with MMR vaccine is the only way to protect against measles. Two doses of MMR vaccine are required to give the best protection. In Ireland, the first dose is given at 12 months by GPs and the second dose is given to Junior Infants in school by HSE vaccination teams or by GPs in Donegal, Sligo and Leitrim. Travelling abroad? All those travelling to Europe and other parts of the world where measles outbreaks are occurring should make sure they have had MMR vaccine. What should adults and parents do? Make sure you or your children are up to date with your MMR vaccines. Please go to your GP for MMR vaccination if: you are under 40 and have not had 2 doses of MMR vaccine you have a preschool or primary school child who never had MMR vaccine you have a primary school child who missed out on the 2nd dose you are not sure if your child has had 2 doses of MMR vaccine What about children under 12 months of age? There is no change to the routine recommendations from the National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC): MMR vaccine is recommended at 12 months and at 4-5 years of age. However, MMR vaccine is recommended for children aged 6-11 months of age, travelling to other countries or regions where measles outbreaks are reported. In most cases the MMR vaccine provides protection after 14 days.  The vaccine is available to healthcare professionals to order free of charge through the National Cold Chain Service. NOTE: If MMR vaccine is given before 12 months of age, this dose is not counted as part of the childhood vaccination programme. MMR vaccine should be repeated at 12 months of age, at least one month after the first vaccine with a further dose at 4 - 5 years of age. What about children under 6 months of age? The MMR vaccine is not recommended before the age of 6 months for infants travelling to areas where there is a measles outbreak. The vaccine is not effective if given before 6 months of age. What about Health Care Workers? Health Care Workers (HCWs) in Ireland should have 2 doses of MMR vaccine. Two of the cases in recent outbreaks in Ireland were HCWs. Further information is available at the links below: Health Protection Surveillance Centre European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control World Health Organization Europe http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/disease-prevention/vaccines-and-immunization/publications/surveillance-and-data/who-epidata World Health Organization http://www.who.int/immunization/monitoring_surveillance/burden/vpd/surveillance_type/active/Global_MR_Update_February_2018.pdf?ua=1 A poster, consent form and frequently asked questions document that can be used during the outbreak are available for download below  This page was updated on 21 March 2018
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Team pinpoints the brain's 'home' for spiritual experiences

Team pinpoints the brain's 'home' for spiritual experiences | Virology News | Scoop.it
Researchers have pinpointed one part of the brain that "lights up" when we consider spiritual experiences, whether religious or not.
Ed Rybicki's insight:
So...one could get a transcranial stimulation device and an app for that??
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Canine influenza sweeps across Brooklyn

Canine influenza sweeps across Brooklyn | Virology News | Scoop.it
An informal survey of veterinarians in Brooklyn, N.Y., showed that more than three dozen dogs have been diagnosed with canine influenza since mid-April, and veterinary internist Dennis Slade says the virus is likely to spread to other boroughs.
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Bullshit Alert: "Ebola Victims In Congo Are Guinea Pigs For The Search Of A Profitable Vaccine"

Bullshit Alert: "Ebola Victims In Congo Are Guinea Pigs For The Search Of A Profitable Vaccine" | Virology News | Scoop.it
Ebola is a biological weapon being tested in Congo in search of a cure vaccine to generate profit Global mortality figures are used to generate fear for Aid...
Ed Rybicki's insight:
There is some VERY bad stuff published in West Africa on vaccines and disease - and this is just another example. Serious horseshit!
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What You Should Know About the Shingrix Vaccine for Shingles Prevention

What You Should Know About the Shingrix Vaccine for Shingles Prevention | Virology News | Scoop.it
This breakthrough vaccine is quickly becoming an integral part of the adult immunization arsenal. ...
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The double-edged sword: How evolution can make or break a live-attenuated virus vaccine

The double-edged sword: How evolution can make or break a live-attenuated virus vaccine | Virology News | Scoop.it
Even students who reject evolution are often willing to consider cases in which evolutionary biology contributes to, or undermines, biomedical interventions. Moreover the intersection of evolutionary biology and biomedicine is fascinating in its own right.
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No link between HPV vaccine, increased risk of autoimmune disorders, study finds

No link between HPV vaccine, increased risk of autoimmune disorders, study finds | Virology News | Scoop.it
Analysis concludes rate of auto-immune diagnosis among 181,000 vaccinated girls between 2007 and 2003 was similar to that of the broader population of adolescent girls
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Nipah virus in Kerala: 10 dead, 22 people quarantined

Nipah virus in Kerala: 10 dead, 22 people quarantined | Virology News | Scoop.it
At least 10 people in Kerala have died due to Nipah virus encephalitis, a rare but emerging infectious disease.
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Why the world needs more than one Ebola vaccine 

Why the world needs more than one Ebola vaccine  | Virology News | Scoop.it
- In the life-and-death race to make the first effective vaccine against Ebola, one company - Merck - seems bound to win.
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Novel canine circovirus strains from Thailand: Evidence for genetic recombination

Novel canine circovirus strains from Thailand: Evidence for genetic recombination | Virology News | Scoop.it

Canine circoviruses (CanineCV’s), belonging to the genus Circovirus of the Circoviridae family, were detected by next generation sequencing in samples from Thai dogs with respiratory symptoms. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of nearly complete CanineCV genomes suggested that natural recombination had occurred among different lineages of CanineCV’s. Similarity plot and bootscaning analyses indicated that American and Chinese viruses had served as major and minor parental viruses, respectively. Positions of recombination breakpoints were estimated using maximum-likelihood frameworks with statistical significant testing. The putative recombination event was located in the Replicase gene, intersecting with open reading frame-3. Analysis of nucleotide changes confirmed the origin of the recombination event. This is the first description of naturally occurring recombinant CanineCV’s that have resulted in the circulation of newly emerging CanineCV lineages.

Ed Rybicki's insight:
Whoo, where to begin...it's a Rep protein gene, NOT a replicase! And CanineCV? SOunds like something a dog would bring to an interview, not a virus! CaCV, maybe?
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