Viruses, Immunology & Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
97.0K views | +37 today
Follow
Viruses, Immunology & Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
Virus and bioinformatics articles with some microbiology and immunology thrown in for good measure
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Leah Nicholson from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Vanishing hope for a cure: Reservoir of inactive HIV viruses may be 60 times larger than thought

Vanishing hope for a cure: Reservoir of inactive HIV viruses may be 60 times larger than thought | Viruses, Immunology & Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it

Hopes of a total cure for HIV have been dealt a blow, after researchers in the US discovered that the "reservoir" of inactive viruses in a patient's body may be up to 60 times larger than previously thought.

Although modern drug treatments have proved hugely effective at controlling the HIV virus, enabling patients to live long and full lives and reducing infection rates, they do not kill all the viruses in an infected individual.

 

These viruses remain a threat because they can become active again if a patient stops taking their antiretroviral drugs. The findings, published in the journal Cell following a study at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) in Maryland, were "discouraging" experts said, but should re-focus efforts to make sure HIV positive people are getting the treatment they need.

 

"The findings suggest that there are a lot more of these proviruses that we have to worry about than we thought," said Robert Siliciano, an HHMI investigator at The Johns Hopkins University, who led the new study. "It doesn't mean that it's hopeless, but it does mean we need to focus on getting an even clearer idea of the scope of the problem."

 

In HIV positive patients the virus targets the immune system's T cells, and becomes integrated into the cell's genes, making the cell reproduce the virus. Antiretroviral drugs target these active forms of the virus, but in some cells, the virus remains inactive. It is this type of virus that researchers now believe is far more numerous than previously thought. As of yet, researchers have no way of eradicating inactive HIV viruses.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chris Upton + helpers from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Noroviruses: The Perfect Human Pathogens?

Noroviruses: The Perfect Human Pathogens? | Viruses, Immunology & Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it

Noroviruses are perhaps the perfect human pathogens. These viruses possess essentially all of the attributes of an ideal infectious agent: highly contagious, rapidly and prolifically shed, constantly evolving, evoking only limited immunity, and just moderately virulent, allowing most of those infected to fully recover, thereby maintaining a large susceptible pool of hosts. These characteristics have enabled noroviruses to become the leading cause of endemic diarrheal disease across all age groups, the leading cause of foodborne disease, and the cause of half of all gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. In the United States alone, noroviruses are responsible for an estimated 21 million cases of acute gastroenteritis annually, including >70,000 hospitalizations and nearly 800 deaths. In developing countries, where the greatest burden of diarrheal disease occurs, noroviruses have been estimated to cause up to 200 000 deaths each year in children


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
NCPbiology's curator insight, June 27, 2014 6:28 AM

Interesting extra reading.

Rescooped by Chris Upton + helpers from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

New microscopy technique lets scientists see live viruses in their natural habitat

New microscopy technique lets scientists see live viruses in their natural habitat | Viruses, Immunology & Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed a new technology that allows them to view live viruses in their natural habitat, as opposed to isolated frozen specimens.

Via Ray and Terry's , Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.