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Vinyl record sales enjoy resurgence in UK

As much of the music industry focuses on digital sales, songs given character by the dips and grooves of vinyl records are finding a resurgence in the UK. Pa...

 

This is a news article clip that talks about how vinyl records are making a comeback in the UK.  One of the reasons given as to why people in the younger generation are looking to vinyl is the fact that it has more "substance."  I take this to mean both the substance in the music as well as the physical nature of the records themselves.

 

The MP3 is regarded as sub-par in quality because it takes out parts of the music that they say people cannot detect in their hearing.  For that reason, a sound engineer that was interviewed for the news story said he wouldn't go near MP3s.  

 

In the UK, 95% of the record and cassette sales come from the small shops.  When the owner of Sister Ray Ltd. was interviewed, he said he has seen a recent spike in record sales, and attributes that to the increase in collectibility and trendiness of records.  People can't collect digital downloads because you either have it or you can easily obtain it.

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Ditric Julian Cannon's curator insight, May 15, 3:28 AM
From a station that covered the "War in Afghanistan" live and gained global attention, they too noticed the resurrection of vinyl record sales. I have traveled to London many times and I know first had of their loyalty to artists the love. I find this report to be evidence of our English counterparts riding the wave of "Rhino Vinyl" or "Wax build up" as I like to call it. We might not look to Al Jazeera  for the next MPC 2000 as audio engineers, but we will listen to their reports of music culture "Across The Pond" and beyond.
Breaff Shadowhuntaz's curator insight, July 22, 5:12 PM
I think creating record day was monumental in the promotion of Vinyl sales in the last decade.Some of the biggest artist in our industry have had releases. The trend of having at least one peace of wax is  moving up.The source of this information is from Al Jezera media company. they are Worldwide news source and so i feel this information is reliable. They are a  good source for information for the worldwide arts and entertainment industry. 
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New Online Music Store at Rock Cellar Magazine! | Rock Cellar Magazine

New Online Music Store at Rock Cellar Magazine! | Rock Cellar Magazine | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Rock Cellar's new online music store is now LIVE!

 

This is an update to an earlier scoop about buying records at particular stores online.  This new store comes from Rock Cellar Magazine, and they have over 500 thousand records in their collection.  The whole reason they put this article out there at this time, obviously, was for the first night of Hanukkah (probably not Christmas). 

 

I am going to shamelessly plug for records and record players being great gifts for people come the holidays.  For me, when I got my record player for Hanukkah, my mom gave me the player, my Nana gave me the records she had in the basement, and some of my cousins gave me some records they thought I would like.  It works as a gift, and it lasts for a very long time.  

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Erika Records :: Vinyl Record Manufacturer :: Keeping Vinyl Alive!

Erika Records :: Vinyl Record Manufacturer :: Keeping Vinyl Alive! | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it

Erika Records is a vinyl record pressing plant that has been around for over 30 years.  Erika has the capability of producing traditional vinyl to anything else imaginable.  If you look at their site, they have records pressed with different colors on the vinyl, pictures of people, even different shapes and sizes.  Erika Records is located in California, and it has been creating unique and custom record shapes and picture records since their inception.

 

They were one of the first companies to make picture and shape records, so they have done so for many famous artists in music history.

 

So, while this doesn't allow the buyer to purchase a custom record with a custom playlist, it does allow the buyer to customize how the record looks.  This is cool, and when I got a colored record for the first time I thought it was pretty fun.  This is a niche, but one that is almost necessary to further increase demand for records.

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I'd like to take a moment to thank and applaud all of the independent punk rock bands and record labels that kept vinyl alive from 1992 to 2005 when everyone else had completely abandoned the vinyl...

I'd like to take a moment to thank and applaud all of the independent punk rock bands and record labels that kept vinyl alive from 1992 to 2005 when everyone else had completely abandoned the vinyl... | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
I would like to hear if anyone from United Pressing or Metropolis Mastering or any of the other businesses and factories that were kept afloat by punk...

 

This is a really interesting Reddit post (that turns into more of a rant) about vinyl records in the period when they were at their lowest, from 1992 until 2005.  The people who posted in this actually bring up some interesting points about the types of people who were actually listening to vinyl at this time.  The LPs in this period were selling for roughly $8 per album, and it was a very difficult industry for people to make any money at all.  Now, similar types of albums are selling on average between $25 and $30 per album.  The industry is coming back, and we can see that in sales and price hikes, but this article gives perspective to the people who stuck with vinyl when it was at its low.

 

In the comments section, people bring up the types of people who really kept vinyl alive in that 13 year period.  Punk type people were the ones most attributed with the trend, and, luckily, they kept it alive long enough for the rest of the groups to find vinyl popular again.

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Play it again: Local record shop keeps spinning vinyl | The Rapidian

Play it again: Local record shop keeps spinning vinyl | The Rapidian | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Local music shop provides customers with great prices, and a better atmosphere.

 

This is an article about a local Michigan record shop that has been open for 13 years in Grandville, Michigan.  This article gives a really interesting prespective on records as a business.  The Corner Record Shop offers vinyl records as the main part of its business,“'Selling vinyl is what keeps me in my house. The CD’s and DVD’s are there, and we have a great selection. But the vinyl is what keeps us in business. Vinyl wasn’t chic when I opened, but there were a few people that never stopped listening to vinyl . . . they kept us in business. I’m just glad to see that vinyl is coming back,'" said the owner Williamson.

 

Due to the upward spike in vinyl record sales, this trend is going to bring even more people into the store.  Corner Record Shop are strong supporters of local music, and they encourage local bands to promote within the store.  This reciprocity is very helpful for the store, and sheds a new, beneficial light on the vinyl record industry.

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The Resurgence of Vinyl Continues In 2012 - Record Stores Making a Comeback? | Dubspot Blog

The Resurgence of Vinyl Continues In 2012 - Record Stores Making a Comeback? | Dubspot Blog | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
For the fourth consecutive year, Nielsen SoundScan reports that more vinyl LPs were purchased than any other year since they began tracking sales in 1991.

 

Vinyl records are making such a comeback that stores themselves are popping up all around the nation.  The image I selected for this scoop demonstrates the upward trend of vinyl album sales since 2006, and the trend is even continuing into this year.  It is projected to reach 600 thousand more record sales in 2012 than in 2011.  

 

This blog offers an explanation for the increase in sales that I find to be unique and interesting compared to the other reasons I have seen. "'When technology is advancing so quickly, Americans tend to reach for something they are familiar with - something as important to American pop culture as vinyl.  Vinyl feels cool, it sounds cool, and it looks cool.  It's also an indicator of someone who's a real music fan.'"  People want to look cool, and people like music.  Therefore, people who own record players look cool because they appear to truly know music better than their friends or people who would see their music collections.

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Breaff Shadowhuntaz's curator insight, July 22, 5:27 PM
I feel that this article is right on point. It is really interesting to me to see trends. From the time of this article until today growth is still happening. Dubspot.com is the source of this ad. They are DJ school in New York, they have been around for years and is a very good school. Not comparable to FSO but there information is very pertinent to the music industry and trends in clubs.
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New Frazier store offers photography supplies, vinyl records | Nooga.com

New Frazier store offers photography supplies, vinyl records   | Nooga.com | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
New Frazier store offers photography supplies, vinyl records...

 

This article is about a store that opened to provide photography supplies, but also sells new-release vinyl records.  This shop, called Space Junk, is owned by Diana Edwards.  She says that she rarely sells the cameras or record players themselves, but does sell a lot of the materials that go along with them.  This is not necessarily the best use of viny records, however it demonstrates to me that vinyl has made enough of a comeback that people are able to sell them in a store meant for photography.  Even though vinyl doesn't have a direct connection to photography, it is still a viable option in this small store.

 

The business is there, and Edwards says that she is looking to expand her store in the near future.  The connection for Edwards is that she is able to sell her two passions - photography and vinyl.  Luckily, the crowd who buys both is similar enough for her to be successful.

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Why Vinyl Sounds Better Than CD, Or Not : NPR

According to Rolling Stone magazine, sales of vinyl albums continue to grow, setting a new record in 2010. Does vinyl reproduce sound better, or is it just a trend?

 

This is an NPR recording about the sound quality of vinyl records.  I actually used this for a presentation that I made about why people should listen to vinyl records, and it provides a lot of good insight into how and why vinyl does sound better than MP3 or electronic recordings.  If you want to listen to the whole bit, it is a 25 minute discussion that originally ran Feb. 10, 2012.

 

This article actually gives CDs some benefits as being important for using in all types of speakers.  Apparently a CD doesn't sound different or blow out speakers, but that is because vinyl has such a perfect, high soundwave compared to the partial waves of CD and MP3.  

 

Later on, it talks about how the soundwave that vinyl plays is so much better than others because it is the perfect soundwave of what is played.  The grooves themselves are perfect replicas of the wave that is played in recording, and for that reason, vinyl has the better sound.  However, when the vinyl gets scratched or the needle isn't great, the sound quality can quickly decrease.

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5 tips for throwing a record party

5 tips for throwing a record party | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
About a year ago, a group of my closest friends got together in a basement apartment in Queens. It was a Saturday night in the dead of winter, and most of us were broke (the economy was crashing)...

 

Think about the types of parties people have today.  In college, you play loud music that you may or may not like in the background, and hopefully it is catchy enough that you start dancing and have a good time.  In the past, people would throw record parties where they would put a particular record on the turntable and listen to the whole thing, front and back.  Maybe they would listen to a few different albums, but the point remains the same - parties were different.  

 

With the undeniable revival of vinyl (and since this article was written 3 years ago) the likelihood of a vinyl party is higher today than when this was written.  Not saying this type of party should replace the parties that are common on college campuses, but this is an alternative to going out to frat parties playing house music.

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Dear Diary...or, I Mean Vinyl Record

Dear Diary...or, I Mean Vinyl Record | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
We’re highlighting small businesses from around the country as nominated by you, our readers.

 

This is a short article about an alternative use for vinyl records.  Katie Pietrak, whose small business Vintage Vinyl Journals, is making journals out of old, unplayable records.  Pietrak has been collecting records for 20 years, and was looking for a way to do something with her albums that were no longer playable.  Pietrak is a former corporate finance professional and earned her MBA at St. Joseph's University, so I would think her business has a good chance to at least get started.

 

The main takeaway is that, while these records are being made into book covers, they are sold at record stores and other retail shops.  People who like vinyl also like the alternative uses for it.  Rather than be able to listen to the music, they're OK with having the record turned into a book.

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Vinyl's growth brings need for turntables

Vinyl's growth brings need for turntables | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Persistent sales growth of vinyl records over the last several years has led to the recent resurgence of the turntable, as well.

 

This article from the USA Today talks about how the increase in sales for vinyl records has caused an increased need for record players (Duh!).  The stats are undeniable, vinyl sales have increased in sales for the past 6 years.  What is confusing is that the equipment to play vinyl should be obsolete, but it is actually increasing in demand and need. 

 

What this article argues, in particular, is that persistent sales growth of vinyl records seems promising to indicate that vinyl is actually making a legitimate comeback.  However, what is arguably more indicative that vinyl is here to stay is the fact that the turntable has had a recent resurgence as well.  This is the first year that turntables achieved growth that parallels that of vinyl records.  "About 54,000 turntable units sold in 2011, an increase of 1.9 percent" after falling 9 of the last 11 years. 

 

Analog music format and the tools to play that are on the rise.  All of this indicates that vinyl is a fad that is becoming something more.

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Vinyl turns tables on rivals

Vinyl turns tables on rivals | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Movies and television are increasingly using LPs to denote cool. Records are what hip people are into. And the reasons are obvious.

 

This article talks about how a lot of recent movies have gone to records and turntables to indicate suave sophistication.  Take Ryan Gosling's character in Crazy Stupid Love.  When he is seducing Emma Stone's character, he takes out a record and puts it on the player... he doesn't play a song on his iPod.  Many other movies and TV shows are doing similar things.

 

This article claims that the reason movies have been doing this is becasue records are tactile.  The article further delves into the argument about MP3 vs vinyl, but doesn't really say too much about the technicality of the argument.

 

The important thing to gather from this article that is different from a lot of the other articles I have talked about is that it mentions many different uses of characters in movies and TV shows using the vinyl and having it indicate that their character is cool, which is a positive for vinyl record users.

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A Record Player Made from Paper, as the FlexiDisc Lives; Thanks Be to Pythagoras

A Record Player Made from Paper, as the FlexiDisc Lives; Thanks Be to Pythagoras | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Making music with technology...

 

This is sort of a way that someone could make their own music using paper, not MP3.  A couple created a paper turntable to play a soung as their wedding invitations.  In reality, though, I just think this is a really cool use of the FlexiDiscs that I talked about in the last couple posts.  This, instead of having the actual disc be made of paper, made a turntable that was the paper and could play vinyl.

 

A sewing needle is the entire playback mechanism for this paper record player.  This is really quite an impressive device, and the video on the site demonstrates some of the cool features.  However, I am not sure how practical something like this would be.  I honestly think that this couple was just being really nerdy and didn't make something that is all that practical (but still is cool). 

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Amazing Vinyl Record - MP3 iPhone Converter - WHOA

Amazing Vinyl Record - MP3 iPhone Converter - WHOA | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
The iLP Conversion Table is an incredible invention that allows you to convert music from vinyl records onto mp3 files that sync directly with your iPhone.

 

This is a really neat invention that allows you to skip a step and record MP3 files of vinyl records directly to your iPod/iPhone/iPad.  This is one of those inventions that is really good because it helps you skip a step, and just have the music right on your iPod so you can take it on the go.  When you later sync your phone to your computer, the music will be transferred and you can have it there as well.  

 

Based upon one of my previous scoops about the largest record collection, 83% of music from the 60s and 70s is not available on CD or MP3.  That is what makes this type of recording device desirable, and the fact that it can be put directly on your phone makes it much quicker than the ones that record onto the computer.  

 

This is really the extent to which transferring vinyl to MP3 has gone.  I only wish there was a way to go in the other direction and make a playlist into vinyl.

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The Essential Music -- and Art -- of The Golden Age of Vinyl

The Essential Music -- and Art -- of The Golden Age of Vinyl | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Five years after the "Golden Age of Vinyl" came to a close, the MTV invasion established the dominance of the music video. A few years later came CDs, with their tiny art and microscopic liner notes.

 

This is an article from the Huffington Post that talks about a new book by Jeff Gold entitled:  101 Essential Rock Records: The Golden Age of Vinyl From the Beatles to the Sex Pistols.  This was a span of 14 years from 1963 until 1977, and the book goes through 101 records from that time.

 

To me, there were a lot of recognizable records that were included in the list.  For instance, Andy Warhol's famous banana cover for the Velvet Underground made the list.  Also, Music by Jimi Hendrix and The Beatles was on the list.  This should come as no surprise at this point in my project, and I am actually interested in getting a copy of the book by Gold myself.  It would give me a place to start collecting records that has a finite goal - 101, and I probably am a good portion of the way there already.

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The World's Largest Record Collection

Rocketboom Spotlight on The Archive, a film by Sean Dunne. Paul Mawhinney was born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA. Over the years he has amassed what has becom...

 

This is a really cool Youtube video that I came across about Paul Mawhinney who is attributed with the largest record collection in the world.  Mawhinney has a record dating back to 1881, and that is just one small part of his roughly 1 million record collection.  

 

One of the coolest facts that Mawhinney admits is that the Library of Congress did a study on his records dating from 1948-1966, and they decided that only 17% of the music in his collection was available to the public on CD.  To put that into perspective, 83% of the music in his collection is not available to the public.

 

The most valuable record in Mawhinney's collection is a Rolling Stones album that was not released to the public.  He has a brand new copy that is worth from 6-10 thousand dollars.

 

When Mawhinney got up to 60,000 records in his basement, his wife made him open up a store called Record-Rama.  Mawhinney would keep one of the records for his collection as an archive, and would sell the extras.  

 

Mawhinney's collection is estimated to be worth 50 million dollars.  He can't even sell it for 3 million, which is a testimate to the current time.

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The Vinyl Lab London's comment, August 14, 2013 10:49 PM
how can you put a value on such a wonderful collection im sure they are priceless to Paul
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Record shop brings nostalgia back on The Murfreesboro Post

Record shop brings nostalgia back on The Murfreesboro Post | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Music abounds in downtown Murfreesboro...

 

This is an article about a different type of record shop owner.  The husband-wife owner combo for this store appears to have different outlooks on life from the other, typical store owners.  Grant Polston said he and his dad were DJs, and they both enjoyed collecting records.  Grant's wife Sandy came from a musical family as well, saying that she remembers her father playing music frequently.  The Polstons don't watch TV, they said, they listen to music.  

 

Similar to the last post, this couple enjoys highlighting local artists in their shop.  They incorporate the handiwork into the accessories section of the store and invite artists to bring their work to sell in the store.  They also have shows for artists to showcase their music.

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Fascinating Photos of Vinyl Aficionados With Their Collections - Flavorwire

Fascinating Photos of Vinyl Aficionados With Their Collections - Flavorwire | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Flavorwire: Cultural news and critique from Flavorpill...

 

This article gives pictures and brief descriptions of some vinyl aficionados with their record collections.  The picture that I chose for this one was the coolest collection I saw in the entire blog post.  This guy has so many records.  Joe Bussard lives in Frederick, MD and is called "The King of 78s."  Rightfully so, as this man has an entire room full of shelves and shelves of his records.  My biggest question would be how could he listen to all of these records?  And as a secondary question, how many are duplicates?

 

The other people that are shown in the blog range from different parts of the world, different ages, and different cultures.  You would maybe expect to see someone of this man's age with his collection, but there are so many other types of people who listen to records.  (From hipsters to DJs to audiophiles to some random person off the street.)  But the pictures and massive collections that are captured by the photos really shows the extremes of how people view their records, and music in general.

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The Subculture of Vinyl Record Fans

The Subculture of Vinyl Record Fans | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
After I wrote Back to Vinyl I started buying used LPs again and playing them on a hand-me-down JVC direct drive turntable.  I quickly realized there’s a psychology to loving vinyl records.  I can i...

 

This is a very interesting and comprehensive blog about vinyl records.  The author has some interesting insight about the fans of vinyl records, as well as some tips about collecting vinyl in general.  

 

In the first section, the author compares current vinyl record fans to fans of other dying pop culture groups such as pulp magazine colectors and silent film buffs.  

 

In the shopping section, the author talks about how the record store is a dying industry.  This, he says, is true of music in all stores as Target and Walmart stores have had shrinking music sections.  Instead, people are more likely to find success purchasing records online.  

 

The author also discusses how people believe vinyl sounds better than electronic recordings.  He also admits that he is not somebody who is able to tell the sound differences.  However, he has said that other people are capable of hearing different instruments and melody simply by listening to songs, and those experts prefer vinyl.  

 

The author also discusses the hipster subculture that is associated with vinyl.  He brings up an interesting point about how this group is interested in a lot of different technologies from before they were born, and attributes their interest in vinyl largely to that fact.

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I Need That Record!

I Need That Record! | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it

This movie was made back in 2008, and when I did a Netflix search for vinyl records, this was the only really relevant movie that came up.  You could argue that this movie is a little outdated, but it came out right at the revival of vinyl records when sales began to increase.  The sales have continued to increase far above what it was even 5 years ago.  

 

The tagline for this movie is what actually got me most interested in watching it.  "The Death (Or Possible Survival) of the Independent Record Store."  I really think that it is interesting how much the industry for vinyl records has truly changed since this movie came out.  This highly awarded Indie film is very good, if you like documentaries, and easily available.  

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Vinyl Record Collector‘s Guide - Vinyl Record Collector‘s Information Guide

Vinyl Record Collector‘s Guide - Vinyl Record Collector‘s Information Guide | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
a web-site dedicated to all Music Fans and especially to all music released on vinyl.

 

This is the homepage for the Vinyl Record Collectors Guide.  This is a pretty basic site that allows you to go through the different types of records and see what good deals are before you buy your record.  It talks about the grading of the vinyls themselves, as well as which records are particularly rare and, therefore, more expensive.

 

This site also judges the album covers (rating the whole package, which is important for vinyl collectors).  This site has a list of banned/censored covers as well as "Sexy & Erotic Album Covers" and "Morbid Album Covers" that make the album more valuable.

 

And, of course, this site sells records itself.  This is a really fully comprehensive website.  The only issue I see is getting trapped thinking that they are telling you the true value of an album, then selling you the album at a likely higher price.  Either way, this is just a good resource for someone who doesn't know the values of albums or is new to collecting.

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Vinyl Makes a Comeback at COC Art Gallery (Video)

Vinyl Makes a Comeback at COC Art Gallery (Video) | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
A needle rapping on a 78 vinyl record is a rare sight these days, but College of the Canyons Art Gallery brought back this blast from the past Thursday when it opened its newest exhibition, Vinyl: ...

 

This is a really cool exhibit at the College of the Canyons Art Gallery that talks about the art that is associated with vinyl records.  This is especially pertinent to me because I gave a presentation last week to my LHC class about why they should purchase vinyl records and one of my main points was the artistic value in the vinyl records.  From the cover, to the song order, and even the songs themselves.  One thing I was unable to mention, but that came to mind quickly, was the effectiveness of the album cover for LPs because they are simply much larger than CDs or MP3 screens.

 

Vinyl: The Art of the Album Cover is one of the main exhibits featured, but it also has colorful records and different types of turntables from different periods to demonstrate the art.  This gallery is intended to give students a look at past technology as a form of art and design.  

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Vinyl records industry joins forces with celebrities to save local stores this season

Vinyl records industry joins forces with celebrities to save local stores this season | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it

This article is about how celebrities are helping the small, local record store owners increase sales of records for the holiday season.  While they may not have been the most famous or popular bands that helped the record stores, but Dr. Dog, one of my personal favorites, was on the list of bands that were helping the stores.  Other "Avant-garde" artists such as M-83 and Edward Sharpe helped as well.

 

For Black Friday, which is most famously known for its deals on technology, seeing records as a form of technology is interesting.  I mean, it is a technology in itself, but it also isn't what comes to mind when you think of Black Friday deals such as a new TV or other great deals that come about at this time.  

 

Also, there were 89 album releases during Black Friday to hopefully increase record sales.  Bands really seem to want record stores to stay around, and the other research I've done is saying that vinyl records are here to stay.

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Sound It Out – A documentary by Jeanie Finlay

Sound It Out – A documentary by Jeanie Finlay | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it

This is the homepage for the documentary Sound it Out.  Sound it Out is about four independent record shops in the UK.  It got really high reviews, and a news article from BBC that I read recently suggested that people see this movie.  There is a preview that you can watch on the homepage, and it looks really interesting.  

 

One thing that I really liked about the documentary was that, even in the preview, it does a really good job of demonstrating how music plays an irreplaceable role in our lives.  The homepage mentions that as one of its selling points, and it definitely shows through.

 

This is a really interesting story about how record stores are closing down, but at the same time the vinyl industry seems to be headed in a positive direction.  This shows contrast to the success stories, but also demonstrates how some of the stores have continued to be successful.

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Acme gives record stores another spin

Acme gives record stores another spin | Vinyl Records Online | Scoop.it
Ken Chrisien is the first to admit that what he's done is "totally insane."...

 

This is an article about Ken Chrisien, a Milwaukee resident, who recently opened his own record store.   Chrisien has invested about 40,000 dollars into his record store. 

 

Yes, Chrisien has heard of iTunes and Amazon, but he thinks he can run the store successfully.  Financially, Chrisien also realizes that he "'won't get a ton back,'" but he is willing to give it a shot because owning a record store was his childhood dream.  

 

While sales for vinyl this past quarter are down from last year, the annual sales have increased, and that is a trend that has lasted five years.  Chrisien plans on having 4,000 to 5,000 LPs on the shelves with new titles taking up about 30 percent of the inventory.

 

Chrisien is also planning on having CDs and 45s in his store.  I get the 45s, but I don't think having CDs benefits anyone anymore.

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