Veterinarian - Aspect 1
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CDC - VETERINARY SAFETY AND HEALTH- subsection title - section title - site title

CDC - VETERINARY SAFETY AND HEALTH- subsection title - section title - site title | Veterinarian - Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
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Tess Laraway's comment, February 20, 2014 10:20 PM
Vets carry a risk of eye contamination with dust or airborne particles and also hearing damage from loud noises such as barking echoing in small spaces (kennels) and loud equipment. Other than needlestick injuries, they are also at risk for other physical injuries such as lacerations and cuts from the use of scalpels and other sharp tools. If these tools are contaminated and the vet is cut by them, it could cause serious illness and even death. Airborne contaminants, dust (from feed, bedding, manure, allergens), cleaners, and disinfectants are all respiratory hazards vets face in the workplace that can be linked to health conditions such as asthma.
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Needlestick injuries in veterinary medicine

Needlestick injuries in veterinary medicine | Veterinarian - Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
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Tess Laraway's comment, February 19, 2014 9:31 AM
Needlestick injuries are very common in the workplace of a veterinarian. Though serious side effects from the needlesticks are uncommon, they do occur. These injuries are a concern for vets because they are exposing themselves to infectious medications and chemicals.
Tess Laraway's comment, February 19, 2014 9:44 AM
Vets are exposed to infections from bloodborne pathogens, organisms from the animal's skin or fur and/or live vaccines. Physical trauma and injury from needlesticks are significant especially if the needle is larger and cuts and lacerations from animals moving during treatments (injections or blood withdrawal). Injections of various substances such as anesthetics or vaccines can have a wide range of risks from mild irritations to something more serious such as systemic reactions.
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Dog Bites & Other Injuries - Nolo.com

Dog Bites & Other Injuries - Nolo.com | Veterinarian - Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
Dog Bites & Other Injuries
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Tess Laraway's comment, February 19, 2014 9:51 AM
Many dog bites cause vets to take time off of work and to pay expensive medical bills. States have laws that hold the pet owner responsible for the injury or damage, but many states do not follow this 100% of the time. Some states have a "one bite rule" that allows animals to bite the vets with virtually no legal punishment(s) to the owners if they are not aware of the animal's temper ahead of time
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Occupational Injuries in Veterinary Practice

Occupational Injuries in Veterinary Practice | Veterinarian - Aspect 1 | Scoop.it
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Tess Laraway's comment, February 18, 2014 9:28 AM
Many vets are self employed or work with a small group at a private practice. Because of this, they do not have insurance provided to them by their employer like other occupations do. This results in vets having to pay for their own insurance. while some do buy their own, others do not which can be expensive considering they are paying out of their own pocket. Money discourages many vets to not report their injuries and avoid care from a doctor for less-serious injuries
Tess Laraway's comment, February 18, 2014 9:36 AM
There are three types of people at the greatest risk of injury in the workplace. (1) Veterinarians new to the job are less-experienced and are at a greater risk. (2) Vets that care for larger animals (horses, cows) receive the most injuries on the job. This is because the animals are bigger and heavier and surgeries require vets to stand in awkward positions which eventually hurts their back and posture. Since it is difficult to transport larger animals, these vets are required to make "house-calls" to sites that lack restraining/lifting equipment. (3) Vets that work more than 60 hours a week or "workaholics" are at a higher risk because of fatigue. This slows reaction time and awareness.
Tess Laraway's comment, February 20, 2014 9:42 PM
Safety precautions are starting to play a bigger role in veterinary medicine in the recent years. Safety measures such as hydraulic lifts, restraining devices, boxes for needle disposal, an increase in safety in veterinary education, and keeping assistants on staff help limit injury to the vets. Injury to a veterinarian can be reduced by gathering information. The more knowledge they have on a topic, the better. Researching prevention techniques can only help them.