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Survey shows Pharma digitally failing patients

Survey shows Pharma digitally failing patients | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
A study by consulting firm Accenture shows that patients not only expect digital outreach, but that their desire to be engaged is consistently being ignored.
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Don't Put Burden on Patient to Initiate Engagement - They Aren't Thinking Clearly

Don't Put Burden on Patient to Initiate Engagement - They Aren't Thinking Clearly | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it

The key to cracking patient engagement isn’t better kinds of technology, it’s understanding patients better. That was the theme that emerged from a panel discussion at the Partners Healthcare Connected Health Symposium, where a doctor, a consultant, and two healthcare executives spoke about their own experiences working with patients in the healthcare system, especially patients with behavior health concerns like depression.

 

“Medicine at large is a people business in need of technology, it is not a technology business looking for people,” Dr. Jordan Shlain, founder of HealthLoop, said. “There’s a lot of homesteaders, data gold diggers, people trying to take big data and make a business out of it while there are people hurting on the other side. And people don’t scale. Technology does, but people don’t.”

 

Shlain argued that although many patient engagement programs make it easier for patients to reach out to their doctor, they still place the burden on the patient, who isn’t always thinking clearly when they’re anxious about their health. Instead, doctors should reach out to their patients.


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, October 25, 2014 10:09 AM


Although this article is focused on how physicians need to help patients engage in their healthcare, it validates a point I made in a Pharma Marketing Blog post: that, in the world of pharma marketing to consumers, pharma is the engager, not the patient. For more on that, read Patient Engagement: Who's the Engager & Who's the Engagee? #Pharma or Patient?

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Pharma Lead & Learn: An Interview with Charlotte Sibley on the Importance of Modern Analytics

Pharma Lead & Learn: An Interview with Charlotte Sibley on the Importance of Modern Analytics | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Check out this interview with Charlotte Sibley, President of Sibley Associates, to discover the importance on modern analytics
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Over 80% of doctors now use smartphones for profession-related reasons at work

Over 80% of doctors now use smartphones for profession-related reasons at work | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Desktops are near universal in UK doctors' offices, and smartphones have also become a part of most physicians' jobs. More than 80% of doctors in the country now use a smartphone regularly for profession-related reasons while at work. Physicians in the UK have also jumped on the social media bandwagon, with almost two-thirds accessing sites such as Wikipedia and YouTube for professional purposes.

Via Alex Butler
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Bettina Gifford's curator insight, October 10, 2014 1:48 AM

Mobile phones are a great digital communication platform for HCPs, opportunities on www.hcpmeetings.com.au

MyHealthShare's curator insight, October 11, 2014 6:26 AM
Over 80% of doctors now use smartphones for profession-related reasons at work - http://flip.it/a5yE6
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Precall Planning: What Do Sales Reps Need to Know About Physician & Account Types?

Precall Planning: What Do Sales Reps Need to Know About Physician & Account Types? | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Enter now to discover the 6 types of physicians sales reps need to know about to create a successful precall planning strategy.
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Top 5 Big Data Myths Revealed | News | Mobile Enterprise(ME)

Top 5 Big Data Myths Revealed | News | Mobile Enterprise(ME) | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Gartner sets the record straight on the state of Big Data. (RT @bobehayes: Top 5 #BigData Myths Revealed http://t.co/x7TgVjGMOt @Gartner_inc)
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Using big data to fight dementia and Alzheimer’s

Using big data to fight dementia and Alzheimer’s | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
OECD convenes workshop on challenges in sharing information from people around the world (#Using big data to fight dementia and Alzheimer's - The Globe and Mail http://t.co/4mVxRuQp0s)...
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The lost art of #pharma selling - samples, sales aids & copy what others do

The lost art of #pharma selling - samples, sales aids & copy what others do | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it

First let me be clear what I mean by selling. I'm talking about a discussion that leads to the identification of needs and the proposal, and hopefully subsequent agreement, of product the rep is selling as a potential means of addressing these needs. This was a time when reps joining a company could expect their first six to eight weeks to consist of enduring the, generously described as functional, three star hotel nearest to their company's head office, where they would spend their time learning to sell their company's three main brands. And to those of you reading this who are under the age of forty, yes that was six to eight weeks, not the six to eight days that would seem like “a long time off the road for training” these days.

 

Now if you're in that sub-forty age bracket you're probably wondering at this point what on earth could a training course agenda have possibly consisted of to fill up six to eight weeks of a reps time. Well believe me when the invite arrived on my doorstep twenty-something years ago I too wondered the same thing and I'm sure did most of my 'Initial training course' alumni did too.

 

However, I can tell you that the time flew by and I'm pretty sure we all learned quite a bit about how to sell pharmaceutical brands. So let's look at how the eight weeks broke down. The first four weeks focused on the disease and the product. None of the distance learning we see nowadays, rather proper face-to-face teaching delivered by people that had made it their craft to both understand and be able to teach representatives with a variety of backgrounds, about diseases, their diagnosis and treatment and how, where and why their company's brand was of benefit. Three brands covered across four weeks, the culmination of which was a written and verbal exam to test understanding.

 

Addendum

Here are some basic tactics you must master to practice the art of pharma selling (source: Basics of Sales Rep Watching):

 

If there are other reps in the office, wait your turn just as if you were at a deli counter at the local Acme super market;Before entering the back office, the sales rep ahead of you must leave the back office;Ask the receptionist if it's OK to drop off your samples in the sample room;After dropping off your samples, wait in the hallway until you can accost the doctor;Get the doctor's signature and leave.
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Pharma Guy's curator insight, September 4, 2014 7:21 AM


A funny thing happened on my way to being PharmaGuy -- I started out working in a pharma sales training company where I developed computer-based training (CBT) programs at a time when most sales reps did not have laptop (notebooks not invented yet) computers.


I remember sales training programs that started out with the basic biology of the disease treated by the product -- that was pretty intense. We had medical writers working on the content, which went on and on for pages!


When the Internet came along and all sales reps had computer that could access the Net, I suggested that the biology portion of the CBT provide links to trusted disease information that was already on the Internet. But that idea did not fly.


In those days, most new sales reps majored in biology in college. These days, most reps seem to have majored in cheerleading: read: Sexy Reps Sell Rx Drugs

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11 Great Things Companies Are Doing With Big Data

11 Great Things Companies Are Doing With Big Data | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Intrigued by the possibilities of analytics? If so, then find out how these 11 organizations are transforming big data into a business-benefiting asset.

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If You’re Missing Fast Data, Big Data Isn’t Working for You

If You’re Missing Fast Data, Big Data Isn’t Working for You | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Big Data analytics are all the rage.There is little doubt some great things can be accomplished when an organization takes to mining its data to produce m (RT @latentview: 3 major capabilities that every Fast Data implementation requires
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Five things for pharma marketers to know: Monday, August 18 - Medical Marketing and Media

Five things for pharma marketers to know: Monday, August 18 - Medical Marketing and Media | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Medical Marketing and Media
Five things for pharma marketers to know: Monday, August 18
Medical Marketing and Media
Roche is said to be considering a full buyout of Japanese drugmaker Chugai.
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Healthcare Professionals Not Stuck in Stone Age, Use Mobile - eMarketer

Healthcare Professionals Not Stuck in Stone Age, Use Mobile - eMarketer | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Nearly all healthcare professionals use PCs every day to do their jobs, but mobile devices are also finding a place in this world, with large majorities of industry professionals picking up mobile phones and tablets daily for work. When turning to digital means for work, healthcare professionals look at independent medical sites or medical news most frequently.

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How Vital is Good Customer Experience in Healthcare? - Pharmaceutical Executive

How Vital is Good Customer Experience in Healthcare? - Pharmaceutical Executive | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Thanks to social media, a good or bad customer experience can go viral and make or break a business. But does this CX argument stand true in health? (Thanks to social media, a good or bad customer experience can go viral and make or break a bus...
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Nimbix speeds up big data analytics with supercomputing cloud | ZDNet

Nimbix speeds up big data analytics with supercomputing cloud | ZDNet | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
HPC is not just for oil and gas industries anymore.
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How Google Glass Will Change Healthcare

15WAYS GOOGLE GLASS WILL TRANSFORM HEALTHCARE @ValaAfshar

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5 Social Media Trends Within Healthcare in 2014

5 Social Media Trends Within Healthcare in 2014 | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it

Every year, social media increasingly integrates with almost every aspect of daily life. According to the Pew Research Center, 73 percent of adults online use some form of social media. So it's not surprising that social media is beginning to work its way into the healthcare arena.

A report by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics found physicians spend twice as much time consulting online resources than traditional print sources. And doctors certainly aren't alone in consulting online sources when it comes to health information. In the U.K., reports place Facebook as the fourth most popular source of health information. In the U.S., between 70 and 75 percent of people look to the internet for healthcare information.

Social media channels are huge portals for sharing information with patients. It seems unlikely the social media trend will die down anytime soon, and healthcare professionals need to become fluent in the ways in which social media can impact and improve their professions and the lives of their patients.

Here are just five of this year's social media trends impacting the healthcare field: 

Crisis Readiness
There's nothing like being prepared when a crisis walks through the door, and social media is making real-time crisis readiness much easier. Thanks to the boom in social media, it's now possible to know when a crisis is occurring, as it occurs.

For instance, medical professionals in Boston were able to keep up with the Boston marathon bombings and be adequately prepared for the onrush of patients. Senior policy adviser at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Ellen Makar told U.S. News social media allowed medical professionals to prep much faster than if they had had to wait for a traditional news report.

Teaching Patients
Online tools and social media can help healthcare providers disseminate information more easily to patients. Instead of having nurses show children how to properly put on bike helmets, parents can be directed to a YouTube video with the same information. Patients concerned about a diagnosis or condition can be directed to additional information sources, so when they come in for an appointment the conversation can be more in-depth, specific, and ultimately more helpful.

Live Tweeting Procedures
It might seem strange, but live tweeting procedures can give current patients and potential patients insight into how medical procedures work from a boots-on-the-ground perspective. With nearly 80 percent of journalists regularly using social networking sites to stay on top of recent developments, use social media to aid in reporting, it's also a good tool to broaden a healthcare organization's media reach. 
In November 2013, St. Vincent Charity Medical Center live tweeted a total knee replacement surgery, allowing more than 3,800 people to tune in and follow the surgery via Twitter. Live tweeting may seem gimmicky, but it works because it gives people insight into the medical process. Surgeons from Sunnybrook Hospital also live tweeted a heart surgery, giving insight into how these procedures work for patients, students and other medical professionals.

Improving Prevention
The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society asks patients to friend and follow certain professional Facebook pages. Then the nurses at the organization keep watch over their Facebook flock, intervening when they see troubling behavior. Director of Nursing Ruthi Moore told U.S. News this policy had helped the nurses prevent at least 12 suicide attempts.

This connection between health providers and patients through social media can help providers intervene when they see something distressing. It gives patients better care overall, because it flips the model from one where a patient has to seek help, to one where help seeks out the patient.

Empowering Patients 
Now, more than ever before, patients have untold information at their fingertips. This can help patients empower themselves, create support groups with other patients, and provide physicians with more information about their conditions. According to the IMS report, 42 percent of survey respondents had used social media to research a healthcare issue. This can help doctors find and study patients with rare conditions, as well as give patients a platform to make their voices heard.

Social media will continue to become a greater part of the healthcare community. While precautions need to be taken to ensure social channels don't step on patient rights, these networks can also help tie doctor and patient more closely together, improve emergency response, and disseminate important information.

 


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Jimmy Durham, RN-BC's curator insight, August 19, 3:17 PM
Nice ideas, but problematic 
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How mHealth and data integration impact patient engagement

How mHealth and data integration impact patient engagement | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Integrating data from mobile health applications and other sources with a patient's electronic health record (EHR) offers more data and greater patient engagement, but industry leaders encourage providers to carefully consider what--and how much--information to collect to ensure the information is useful to both providers and their patients.

Via Alex Butler
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Dr. Kevin McGuinness's curator insight, October 9, 2014 10:18 AM

add your insight...

The author makes a very important distinction about patient engagement here.  mHealth (including the EHR) and mbHealth cannot become a generic market place or a data dump.  Patient engagement is about the patient and the health practitioner.For patient engagement to be credible, mHealth and mbHealth must be outcome-vetted within that relationship. 

 

Customer engagement, on the other hand, is what happens between health practitioners or individuals and health product vendors. Customer engagement is about sales outcomes right now, not health outcomes.

 

"Patient engagement" is not a euphemism for "customer engagement."  Lets guard against that.

Keith McGuinness's curator insight, October 9, 2014 11:55 AM

Semantic note:


When physicians and EHR vendors use the phrase 'patient engagement' they are talking about increasing engagement between the the patient and the physician.  


When app developers uses the word 'engagement' (with or without the 'patient' suffix) they are, generally speaking, talking about increasing 'engagement' between a customer and an app.  


When an app developer and a physician talk, progress is slow because, with the rarest of exceptions, neither is fluent in the language of the other.    


Patient/customer engagement with mHealth apps in general and mbHealth apps in particular, is a dead-end without physician adoption.  And physician adoption of apps is a dead-end without a credible link between engagement and a specific health outcome.  


Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 2014 5:21 AM

Une intéressante réflexion sur le bénéfice patient que peuvent apporter l'utilisation de dossiers médicaux numériques partagés. Et la constatation qu'il faut certainement se concentrer sur les données les plus "rentables" en termes de santé, plutôt que de sombrer dans la tentation d'obtenir le dossier le plus complet possible.

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Twitter in healthcare - Statistics

Twitter in healthcare - Statistics | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it

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Senior, Personnes Agées & Silver Economie's curator insight, September 30, 2014 4:21 AM

add your insight...


Ignacio Fernández Alberti's curator insight, September 30, 2014 2:13 PM

agregar su visión ...

Barbara Letscher's curator insight, October 2, 2014 4:45 AM

Très bonne infographie, claire, sourcée, intéressante. Où l'on voit bien tout l'intérêt de suivre ce qui circule sur les réseaux sociaux à propos d'un produit ! Chez Takeda, il y a des actions à mener par exemple...

Et vous, vous suivez ?

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8 Healthcare Marketing Lessons Learned from the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

8 Healthcare Marketing Lessons Learned from the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it

By now, we’ve all heard of the social media phenomenon that’s swept the nation: the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, meant to raise awareness for the neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Though it wasn’t planned in a corporate boardroom, the Ice Bucket Challenge demonstrates the enormous publicity power of grass roots marketing. The campaign brought awareness to the disease on an unprecedented scale.

Planning your own viral campaign for your healthcare facility? Here are some critical marketing lessons you can learn from the Ice Bucket Challenge.

Simplicity is key – The rules of the challenge were simple: dump a bucket of ice on your head, or donate $100 to the ALS Foundation – then nominate three friends to do the same. Make your campaign as simple as possible with as few steps as possible, and make sure your patients don’t have to do too much extra work on their end. The more complicated the call to action is, the less likely it is that your patients will engage.

Capitalize on shareability – After their own challenge was complete, participants would then nominate three others to record their own videos. Think of the enormous marketing potential one friend, with hundreds of connections, has when reposting the message. Now imagine tripling that. The viral reach of the campaign exploded. Make sure your campaign’s early adopters are encouraged to share your message with their own networks.

Timing is everything – Timing is an integral part of any campaign. Would dumping a bucket of ice water over your head during the already cold winter season have impacted the success of the campaign? Probably. The ice bucket challenge began during the summer season, when many people (especially younger generations, who are usually the first proponents of social media initiatives) have more flexible schedules, which means more time they can dedicate to extraneous activities.  Be sure to think about the details of your campaign, and make sure the timing of your campaign launch is in line with your vision.

Make it fun – The Ice Bucket Challenge was a fun “recorded selfie” of the participant doing something ridiculous for a great cause. And who wouldn’t want to watch their friends have a giant bucket of ice water poured on their heads? Though the message of the campaign is serious, the challenge itself is fun for people to engage in. Keep your campaign entertaining so that your patients will actually want to participate.

Create a sense of urgency – Truly viral campaigns won’t last forever. The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge initiated a challenge that nominees only had 24 hours to complete. By setting that quick timeframe, people were forced to participate and spread the word immediately.

Get celebrities involved – Once the media started talking about the challenge, celebrities began participating and nominating other celebrities. Notable stars included Oprah Winfrey, Bill Gates,Lady Gaga, Lebron James and more. Having a celebrity participate in your healthcare initiative is a win-win for both you and the public figure: your organization can capitalize on their large social media following and clout and the celebrity can enhance his or her image by aligning with a good cause. Consider aligning with local politicians, community influencers or major public figures that have a connection with the health issue you’re promoting.

Encourage user-generated content – The Ice Bucket Challenge allowed participants to create their own videos and express unique ways to engage in the campaign. Create a campaign that encourages patients or community members to develop simple, fun content of their own: videos, photos, creative write-ups, etc. This will increase the chances of your campaign going viral while allowing your organization to further interact with the patient population.

Be prepared for the press – Even if your campaign doesn’t reach the level of success the ALS bucket challenge did, you still need to have a public relations plan in place should you generate media attention. In this tech age, social media can spread messages like wildfire. Be sure to have proper messaging prepared and a spokesperson in place before you begin the campaign so that your healthcare organization can capitalize on any media opportunities that arise.


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Jade Nicole Burman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:27 AM

These are great marketing strategies. Defiantly something i'm going to look back on in the future.

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New chief executive and chairman for Evaluate | Pharmafile

New chief executive and chairman for Evaluate | Pharmafile | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Pharmafile.com is a leading portal for the pharmaceutical industry, providing industry professionals with pharma news, jobs, events, and service company listings.
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Five Factors In Building Giants Of The Big Data Era | TechCrunch

Five Factors In Building Giants Of The Big Data Era | TechCrunch | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
As we enter the second half of 2014, it would be fair to say that big data has gone mainstream, attracting coffee table books, multiple industry landscapes,.. (Exciting world we are entering. Some good guidelines for thriving in world of big data!
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The eight must-have elements for resilient big data apps

The eight must-have elements for resilient big data apps | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
If your company is building big data applications, here are eight things you need to consider.

Via Don Dea
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Don Dea's curator insight, August 24, 2014 11:28 PM
Define a blueprint for resilient applications

The first step is to create a systemic enterprise architecture and methodology for how your company approaches big data applications. What data are you after? What kinds of analytics are most important? How will metrics, auditing, security and operational features be built in? Can you prove that all data was processed? These capabilities must be built into the architecture.

Other questions to consider: What technology will be crucial? What technology is being used as a matter of convenience? Your blueprint must include honest, accurate assessments of where your current architecture is failing. Keep in mind that a resilient framework for building big data applications may take time to assemble, but is definitely worth it.

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Healthcare Marketers Are Behind the Curve on Content

Healthcare Marketers Are Behind the Curve on Content | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
We've all been there—Googling a laundry list of symptoms out of concern that our cough and runny nose could be something more serious. In fact, the third most popular online activity—right behind checking email and using a search engine—is looking for answers to health-related questions, according to a Pew Internet survey.

Via COUCH Medcomms
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Could Pharma Companies Succeed in the Digital Health Market? - Bio-IT World

Could Pharma Companies Succeed in the Digital Health Market? - Bio-IT World | VeriPharma News | Scoop.it
Could Pharma Companies Succeed in the Digital Health Market?
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How Big Pharma is Killing Americans...

Should Americans be forced to choose between surviving a devestating disease or living a life of poverty? The pharmaceutical industry thinks so.
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