Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary
649 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Gordon Shupe from Digital Imaging - Telling the Story
onto Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary
Scoop.it!

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it

By Ferris Jabr

 

"How exactly does the technology we use to read change the way we read? How reading on screens differs from reading on paper is relevant not just to the youngest among us, but to just about everyone who reads—to anyone who routinely switches between working long hours in front of a computer at the office and leisurely reading paper magazines and books at home; to people who have embraced e-readers for their convenience and portability, but admit that for some reason they still prefer reading on paper; and to those who have already vowed to forgo tree pulp entirely. As digital texts and technologies become more prevalent, we gain new and more mobile ways of reading—but are we still reading as attentively and thoroughly? How do our brains respond differently to onscreen text than to words on paper? Should we be worried about dividing our attention between pixels and ink or is the validity of such concerns paper-thin?"


Via Jim Lerman, Gordon Shupe
Gordon Shupe's insight:
I will admit it, I have yet to read an entire novel or non-fiction book (of over a 100 pages) on an electronic device. But that is partly because I don't typically read novels and the non-fiction topics that I am interested in are not yet available in electronic form. But I have read (and do read) comprehend and 'know' a small library's worth of information over the last few years in smaller chunks from the screen of my various devices. I agree with the research and acknowledge the continued need for printed reading skills and materials. But I would also point out that these two formats should not be mutually exclusive, but rather are complimentary. Reading, managing, recalling, citing, validating digital text is quite different from printed text. It may be that printed text is preferable given a certain history/experience/purpose/ or skill set. But there are just as many advantages to electronic texts, and maybe we need to address them as two different important literacies as educators. It reminded me of comments I made when the iPad first came out: http://www.shupester.com/files/iPadDifferent.php iOS / iPad not 'better' but 'good different'?
more...
Pam Colburn Harland's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:57 AM

I loved the part about mind mapping and the meta-cognitive things we do before we start reading. Great article with research-based facts.

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:32 AM

I think that, given time, our brains will adapt. The generation now in primary school are hardwiring their brains from toddlerhood. But for older readers, my own experience is that while the screen grabs the brain and gets me reading, I don't necessarily read attentively.

It might also increase differences between poor and wealthy as those with access to multiple devices may develop differently to those without. But the jury is still out as to who will have the advantage.

Angela Watkins's curator insight, December 30, 2013 3:23 PM

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/11/so-the-internets-about-to-lose-its-net-neutrality ... http://angelawatkins57.blogspot.com - http://pinterest.com/angeladwatkins

Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary
In a Google World, how important are words? Very!
Curated by Gordon Shupe
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Dangerous Writing Apps - Product Hunt

Dangerous Writing Apps - Product Hunt | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Focus. Write. Never Look back. A collection of writing apps that will help you get things done.. Discover 8 curated products like GradeProof and iA Writer 4 about Dangerous Writing Apps followed by 104 followers
Gordon Shupe's insight:
I wonder if it wouldn't be fun for students to experiment with writing under using some of these apps?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

I Can't Answer These Texas Standardized Test Questions About My Own Poems

I Can't Answer These Texas Standardized Test Questions About My Own Poems | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Dose of reality: test makers are for-profit organizations. My poems are a whole lot cheaper than Mary Oliver’s or Jane Kenyon’s, so there’s that. But how would your vulnerable, nervous, number two pencil-gripping seventh grade self have felt opening your test packet to analyze poetic lines such as this: I’m just down with a sniffly case/of sudden-self-loathing-syndrome…an unexpected extra serving/ of just-for-now-self-hate.

Seriously? Hundreds of my poems in print and they choose THAT one? Self-loathing and self-hate? Kids need an extra serving of those emotions on testing day?
Gordon Shupe's insight:
What (really) if anything are our standardized tests measuring?!!!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

The Quantified Baby: Ready or Not, Here The Products Come

The Quantified Baby: Ready or Not, Here The Products Come | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
New wearable technology for infants aims to help parents close the "word gap," but some early childhood experts are skeptical.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
A must read for forward thinking educators and parents! There are at least 7 threads of provocative discussion entwined in this article:
➡︎ wearable technology
➡︎ quantifiable self
➡︎ environmental language and literacy
➡︎ language acquisition stage theory
➡︎ data driven decisions
➡︎ 'biofeedback' and 'technofeedback'
➡︎ self-awareness and other-awareness
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Grammar Expert: Synonyms, Antonyms and Homonyms on the App Store

Read reviews, compare customer ratings, see screenshots, and learn more about Grammar Expert: Synonyms, Antonyms and Homonyms. Download Grammar Expert: Synonyms, Antonyms and Homonyms and enjoy it on your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Good tool gone free for a limited time!
more...
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Voice Translator - Speak and Translate Foreign Languages Instantly

Get Voice Translator - Speak and Translate Foreign Languages Instantly on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Moving yet closer to having a Tricorder in my pocket! Although advertised as a Traveler's app, this is a great tool for teachers to have for ESOL students.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens

Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
We've adapted our reading habits to fit our screens, but at a cost.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Honest considerations… paper and books are not dead.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Vocabulary, Keywords, Tagging & Search Skills | Technology Integration, Standards | Ed Tech Thoughts from the Space Coast

Vocabulary, Keywords, Tagging & Search Skills | Technology Integration, Standards | Ed Tech Thoughts from the Space Coast | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Reflections of an educational technology specialist on pedagogy, curriculum, assessment, culture, and technology integration.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Thinking again about an essay I wrote on the importance of teaching the digital literacy of tagging/keywording, search strategies and how this works hand in hand with verbal literacy, reading and vocabulary.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gordon Shupe from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

What Language Does Your State Speak? ~ Slate

What Language Does Your State Speak? ~ Slate | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it

by Ben Blatt

 

"One of the most interesting data sets for aspiring mapmakers is the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Among other things, that survey includes a detailed look at the languages spoken in American homes. All the maps below are based on the responses to this survey. For instance, Mandarin, Cantonese, and other Chinese dialects are separated as different responses in the data and were treated as different languages when constructing these maps. If those languages had been grouped together, the marking of many states would change. In addition, Hawaiian is listed as a Pacific Island language, so following the ACS classifications, it was not included in the Native American languages map. "


Via Jim Lerman
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Interesting summary views of spoken languages. Thanks Jim, for sharing!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

How Little Do Users Read?

On the average Web page, users have time to read at most 28% of the words during an average visit; 20% is more likely.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

If this is what is happening in the adult population... how does this factor in to reading for the K12 audience?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Texas library offers glimpse of bookless future

Texas library offers glimpse of bookless future | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Texas has seen the future of the public library, and it looks a lot like an Apple Store: Rows of glossy iMacs beckon. iPads mounted on a tangerine-colored bar invite readers.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

A bold step... 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

50 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Languages - Edudemic

50 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Languages - Edudemic | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Do you think you know everything there is about language? Test your knowledge with these many obscure facts about languages!
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Fascinating- language is absolutely fascinating!

Checkout the bulleted list and then the infographic of the same below. Which one did you like better?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

9 Tips Every Teacher should Know about Google Scholar ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

9 Tips Every Teacher should Know about Google Scholar ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Gordon Shupe's insight:

The last couple of years I have been thinking a lot about verbal literacy's role in effective search skills. This article is a good overview over the power of search and how to hone one's skills, which includes expanding one's operational vocabulary.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Future of the Book | IDEO

Future of the Book | IDEO | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Exploring the potential of book publishing in digital formats | IDEO
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Now this is what I am talking about! Transforming applications of technology for reading.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog

10 Ways to Spot a Fake News Article - EasyBib Blog | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Fake news is popping up everywhere! Use these 10 tips to spot them a mile away.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
Excellent and timely article. I think we need to hold all journalists and opinion publishers to a higher level of integrity. I don't like to be suckered or manipulated. But I do like to hear the facts and learn from different perspectives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

10 Rules For Efficient Form Design — UX Planet

10 Rules For Efficient Form Design — UX Planet | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
by Nick Babich
Gordon Shupe's insight:
As a form of written communication, survey design is certainly a modern verbal literacy!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

The mystery over the @ sign - BBC News

The mystery over the @ sign - BBC News | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
The @ symbol has been used by Renaissance merchants, Victorian book-keepers and social networkers.
Gordon Shupe's insight:
fascinating etymology of a 'letter' in our daily tech vocabulary
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

English grammar for beginners - EnglishTrackerKids on the App Store

Read reviews, compare customer ratings, see screenshots, and learn more about English grammar for beginners - EnglishTrackerKids. Download English grammar for beginners - EnglishTrackerKids and enjoy it on your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Fun little iOS App for developing grammar skills - Free this weekend!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Rewordify.com | Understand what you read

Rewordify.com | Understand what you read | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Rewordify.com helps you read more, understand better, learn new words, and teach more effectively.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Just stumbled across this evening on Twitter #edtechchat - I must remember to share this with my staff!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Using Webb's Depth of Knowledge to Increase Rigor

Using Webb's Depth of Knowledge to Increase Rigor | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Norman Webb's Depth of Knowledge Levels is a system that categorizes tasks according to the complexity of thinking required to successfully complete them.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

For all the talk of increasing "rigor", this is probably the most practical article I've read about planning and measuring rigor in the class.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Word Lens

Word Lens | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Get Word Lens on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

This bizarre app will drop your jaw for free now!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

The Fischbowl: Why I Wouldn't Turnitin

Gordon Shupe's insight:

Once again Karl makes me think. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Reading 2.0

Reading 2.0 | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Many educators are worried about how technology is affecting the amount of reading that students are doing. They notice that:


Students are struggling to read and comprehend longer texts.
Students a
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Great summary ~ State of the Readers address!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

5 effective reading response activities on the iPad

5 effective reading response activities on the iPad Paul Hamilton takes us through 5 literacy tasks that allow students to develop reading comprehension on t...
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Well done!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Shupe
Scoop.it!

Reading Fluency Infographic: Countdown to Comprehension

Reading Fluency Infographic: Countdown to Comprehension | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Research shows that reading fluency is the key to building solid comprehension. How can you help your students become more fluent?
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Now appearing on a webpage near you: Content Marketing (a company that sells something offering -content- or information about their area of expertise) in an infographic form. Sort of like an online infomercial but better.

 

I think literacy includes knowing your source. Nice infographic, good infor, but still content marketing.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Gordon Shupe from Digital Imaging - Telling the Story
Scoop.it!

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it

By Ferris Jabr

 

"How exactly does the technology we use to read change the way we read? How reading on screens differs from reading on paper is relevant not just to the youngest among us, but to just about everyone who reads—to anyone who routinely switches between working long hours in front of a computer at the office and leisurely reading paper magazines and books at home; to people who have embraced e-readers for their convenience and portability, but admit that for some reason they still prefer reading on paper; and to those who have already vowed to forgo tree pulp entirely. As digital texts and technologies become more prevalent, we gain new and more mobile ways of reading—but are we still reading as attentively and thoroughly? How do our brains respond differently to onscreen text than to words on paper? Should we be worried about dividing our attention between pixels and ink or is the validity of such concerns paper-thin?"


Via Jim Lerman, Gordon Shupe
Gordon Shupe's insight:
I will admit it, I have yet to read an entire novel or non-fiction book (of over a 100 pages) on an electronic device. But that is partly because I don't typically read novels and the non-fiction topics that I am interested in are not yet available in electronic form. But I have read (and do read) comprehend and 'know' a small library's worth of information over the last few years in smaller chunks from the screen of my various devices. I agree with the research and acknowledge the continued need for printed reading skills and materials. But I would also point out that these two formats should not be mutually exclusive, but rather are complimentary. Reading, managing, recalling, citing, validating digital text is quite different from printed text. It may be that printed text is preferable given a certain history/experience/purpose/ or skill set. But there are just as many advantages to electronic texts, and maybe we need to address them as two different important literacies as educators. It reminded me of comments I made when the iPad first came out: http://www.shupester.com/files/iPadDifferent.php iOS / iPad not 'better' but 'good different'?
more...
Pam Colburn Harland's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:57 AM

I loved the part about mind mapping and the meta-cognitive things we do before we start reading. Great article with research-based facts.

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:32 AM

I think that, given time, our brains will adapt. The generation now in primary school are hardwiring their brains from toddlerhood. But for older readers, my own experience is that while the screen grabs the brain and gets me reading, I don't necessarily read attentively.

It might also increase differences between poor and wealthy as those with access to multiple devices may develop differently to those without. But the jury is still out as to who will have the advantage.

Angela Watkins's curator insight, December 30, 2013 3:23 PM

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/11/so-the-internets-about-to-lose-its-net-neutrality ... http://angelawatkins57.blogspot.com - http://pinterest.com/angeladwatkins