Venture Vision
94 views | +0 today
Follow
Venture Vision
start-ups, straight talk, entrepreneurship, intrapreneurship, innovation and inspiration
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jamee Lyn Devlin
Scoop.it!

Don't want a wearable on your wrist? Stick It In Your Ear.

Don't want a wearable on your wrist? Stick It In Your Ear. | Venture Vision | Scoop.it
Wearable devices, in particular activity trackers — i.e. glorified pedometers — have skyrocketed wearable technology to the mainstream. Companies left and right are hopping on the wearables bandwagon with very limited success. The industry is calling it wearable fatigue. Wearables aren’t sticking because consumers are not willing to alter their behavior to accommodate the product.…
Jamee Lyn Devlin's insight:

We are a consumer industry fast approaching the point of weariness with wearables for the wrist and face, but science would indicate a new form of wearable is more likely to gain market traction: Hearables.


Yes, you heard right. "Hearables" are devices that are designed rather like a very comfortable earbud with easily adjusted options allowing consumers to track physical fitness, listen to music or take a call, much the same as any smartphone app or Fitbit. The difference? Well, it's in your ear of course.


But why the ear? Isn't that more annoying than having one on your wrist? Maybe not.


While not everyone wants to wear a band or other instrument to track physical fitness, 75% of exercisers already wear a headset for music while working out. 84% track their physical fitness in some way, and 75% would change their headset if it would do both. Hearables such as The Dash by the German corporation Bragi are now offering just that.


The transition for health and fitness seems only natural, and that's not to mention the extremely large market for hearing aids to do more, such as keep track of heart rate or call for emergency assistance in the event of a heart attack or stroke.


"Because the human ear is not involved in aggressive physical activity (unlike the case for the arm, wrist, and leg), motion artifacts can be thoroughly removed with existing optomechanical technology, and biometric wearable earbuds are as accurate as chest-straps during aggressive exercise." says an article by Venture Beat.

http://venturebeat.com/2014/09/22/hearables-why-the-ear-will-make-wearables-stick/


While there are significant advantages to hearables, such as battery life extension, there is also no possibility for visual future trends such as augmented reality. 


With the general consumer disappointment of the current wearable market, will the ear win out over the wrist in the long run? Who can say now, but I'll certainly be listening up for more in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jamee Lyn Devlin
Scoop.it!

The Evolution of the Desk

The Evolution of the Desk | Venture Vision | Scoop.it
a team at the harvard innovation lab has encapsulated this history of technology, as it relates to the office, in a video, 'the evolution of the desk'.
Jamee Lyn Devlin's insight:

Just last week, the internet went on the fritz for an hour or so at my office. When it happened, the reaction of each of my colleagues was more or less unanimous. We all did a sort of double-take of disbelief, then looked around rather numbly for a moment as if we couldn't quite remember where we all were, then we all got up, stretched and wandered into the kitchen for coffee (some of us still stubbornly attempting to reconnect on our phones, to no avail).


While we leaned on counters and refueled our caffeine fixes gossiping about last night's Breaking Bad and awaiting the return of our ability to work, I reflected a bit on why i didn't seem to thin I could get back to work without the internet. It occurred to me that I personally was at a loss for what to do because I had been doing some research for my presentation. All of it online, of course.


As I stood there, mug in hand, I pondered how I ever once did that without the internet. It actually took me a moment to remember that there was a time in the not-so-distant past when I used to pore over encyclopedias, books I'd checked out from the library, industry magazines, international newspapers, and research documents on microfilm, which I may or may not have been able to print out to take home. If not, I had to use an actual pen and take actual physical notes.


This video by the Harvard Innovation Lab  reminded me of just how far we've come, whether or not entirely for the good, since I last did a report that covered my desk in dogeared microfilm printouts and newspapers covered in red marker circles and arrows.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jamee Lyn Devlin
Scoop.it!

The importance of clear communication.

The importance of clear communication. | Venture Vision | Scoop.it
Jamee Lyn Devlin's insight:

Happy Friday.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jamee Lyn Devlin
Scoop.it!

Take the Babel Fish out of your ear - use Skype Translator for your next sci-fi fix

Take the Babel Fish out of your ear - use Skype Translator for your next sci-fi fix | Venture Vision | Scoop.it
Skype users will soon be able to conduct voice and video calls supported by real time language translation.
Jamee Lyn Devlin's insight:

As an American living in Denmark, I make a lot of calls to my family at home, and Skype has been quite the money-saver over the years.


Recently, my husband's Danish family met my American family at our wedding and everyone hit it off swimmingly. Although we would all like to communicate more, and while Skype is available on all of our devices, we still have a basic communication problem - translation.


While some of my husband's family do speak English, many of them, including my in-laws, do not. My parent's and my husband's Skype anyway, awkwardly communicating through gestures and speaking loudly, as if that will make them better understood. Charming, but not particularly effective.


For all the many times I have wished for a real-life version of the Babel Fish (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babel_fish), their frustrations may soon be a thing of the past.


Microsoft, among others like Google, has been testing a verbal translator designed to make language communication differences a thing of the past. And while Skype will only offer a beta version to the public around the end of the year, and only in a few languages to start, imagine the implications not only for personal chats, but also for business negotiations and international online meetings.


Not exactly a Babel Fish, but a slightly more realistic second I am looking forward to trying.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jamee Lyn Devlin
Scoop.it!

Wearables poised to be a $10 billion industry by 2017 - But will it replace the Smartphone?

And on this week′s Industry Insight... we are going to take a look at wearables... and whether or not they could be the next evolution in mobile technology... knocking the smartphone off...
Jamee Lyn Devlin's insight:

Despite wireless issues and an extremely short battery life, the Wearables market is expected to top $3 billion this year alone.


Both Apple and Samsung have partnered with well-known fashion industry icons such as Burberry and Tag Heuer to make new wearable models appear stylish and perhaps even more generically palatable, but will it be enough to convert non-techies and late adopters just getting on board the Smartphone trend? 


This brief overview by Arirang News Industry Insight gives a visual idea as per why consumers may yet choose to leave their Smartphones at home and start to wear them instead, and what the individual turn-offs might be that could limit adoption. 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jamee Lyn Devlin
Scoop.it!

A Quick Guide to Buying Your First 3D Printer - 3DPrint.com

A Quick Guide to Buying Your First 3D Printer - 3DPrint.com | Venture Vision | Scoop.it
3DPrint.com
A Quick Guide to Buying Your First 3D Printer
3DPrint.com
Although it's a relatively new industry, there are a lot of 3D printers available on the market.
Jamee Lyn Devlin's insight:

The US military is printing pizzas for soldiers, China has printed vertebrae for surgery patients, and hard rock band Linkin Park has printed action figures of themselves for their fans. 3D printing has come farther, faster than many of us can keep up with. The response? Most consumers' (and many a corporation's) reaction is to want one.

 

But where to start? What do most average people know about purchasing a 3D printer?

 

Luckily for those of us not technical geniuses or working in the medical industry, 3DPrint.com has provided a comprehensive How-To list, including everything from comparison forums to guarantees and support, for shopping for your first 3D printer.

 

Check it out here.

more...
No comment yet.