Potpourri
537 views | +0 today
Potpourri
Anything and Everything of interest
Curated by Mary Rack
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mary Rack
Scoop.it!

The Teacher. Guru - Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Shambhala - YouTube

The Teacher. Guru - Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Shambhala - YouTube | Potpourri | Scoop.it
"In relating with the teacher, your critical input and your surrendering work together at the same time. They're not working against each other. The more you...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2015 4:43 PM

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago

Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago | Potpourri | Scoop.it
People have been farming — and eating — a GMO for thousands of years without knowing it. Scientists have found genes from bacteria in sweet potatoes around the world. So who made the GMO?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
newgen's comment, July 9, 2015 5:42 AM
thanks for share!
Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:48 PM

Yes, the title is somewhat misleading (isn't that almost expected these days?), since humanity has been selectively breeding crops since the first agricultural revolution and genetic alteration can occur independent of human intervention.  Humanity has always been using the best technologies available to improve agricultural practices.  The term GMO though, is usually reserved for scientific, technological modifications that were unimaginable 100 years ago.  

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 2016 9:32 PM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Mary Rack from M-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications
Scoop.it!

17 SEO Myths to Leave Behind in 2015 [Free Ebook]

17 SEO Myths to Leave Behind in 2015 [Free Ebook] | Potpourri | Scoop.it
Make sure your 2015 SEO strategy is up to snuff by downloading this new free ebook.

Via Danielle M. Villegas
more...
Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, December 19, 2014 10:01 AM

Tina Howe shared this gem on Facebook. As SEO strategies seem to be changing, and this is a topic that I think I need to get better knowledge of, it seems like a good resource to use going forward. 

--techcommgeekmom

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The United Bike Lanes of America

The United Bike Lanes of America | Potpourri | Scoop.it
What do America's bike paths look like from coast coast and how do bike lanes in cities stack up?

 

Tags: transportation, planning.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 13, 2014 1:50 PM

With the rise in gas emissions, everyone is trying to make a stride towards reducing this effect and cleaning up our society. One way in particular is using a bike to get to work. Although it may not seem like something we are used to, it is definitely something we should start getting used to. Looking at this map of the bike lanes in america we see a large amount of the west coast and east coast dedicated towards pushing the issue so that bikes become more prevalent. In theory using bikes will not only reduce emission but it makes for a healthier human body by exerting physical activity instead of sitting back and cruising your way to work. To my knowledge if we try for pushing the issue with more bikes then we are also helping our environment 

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Learn What Spatial Analysis Can Do for You

Learn What Spatial Analysis Can Do for You | Potpourri | Scoop.it

"This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is for people who know something about data analysis and want to learn about the special capabilities of spatial data analysis. Spatial analysis focuses on location to gain a deeper understanding of data. Spatial analysis skills are in high demand by organizations around the world. You'll get free access to the full analytical capabilities of ArcGIS Online, Esri's cloud-based GIS platform. Previous experience with GIS software is helpful, but not necessary for tech-savvy problem solvers. Could you and your career go places with spatial analysis?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 3:43 PM

This course starts tomorrow...if you've wanted to learn about GIS with a no-risk on-ramp, this looks to be a safe bet from the worldwide leader in geospatial software.  While a grad student at Penn State, I was a TA for a course designed by David DiBiase (the instructor of the MOOC), and I still refer back to that class as one of the best courses to teach geographic skills for the non-geography major.  


Tagsmapping, spatial, teacher training, GIS ESRI, geospatial, edtech.

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Beautiful Physical Landscapes

"#TheRidge is the brand new film from Danny Macaskill... For the first time in one of his films Danny climbs aboard a mountain bike and returns to his native home of the Isle of Skye in Scotland to take on a death-defying ride along the notorious Cuillin Ridgeline."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:37 AM

Beautiful Physical Landscapes

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2014 7:37 PM

Engage boys with Landforms and Landscapes - intro video!

Geography with Mrs Dunn's curator insight, January 10, 2017 3:33 AM

Place – what does the place look like? What could the place be used for?

Space - how could this space be significant?

Environment – what type/s of environments can you see in this video? How is the relationship between people and environments important?

Interconnection – what elements of interconnection can you see in this video? What evidence of the interaction between the spheres can you see?

Scale – how is this environment important on a variety of scales? (Local/national/global)

Sustainability – how can people use this, and other landscapes, sustainably?

Change – how do you think this landscape has changed over time? What has caused those changes? Predict what future changes may occur in this landscape.

 

Further information:

http://www.redbull.com/au/en/bike/stories/1331682379336/danny-macaskill-trial-biking-video-the-ridge

 

http://skyeguides.co.uk/summer-activities/ridge-traverses/

 

http://www.cuillinridge.co.uk/index.html

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Potpourri | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"

 

This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 12, 2014 11:40 AM

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

Scooped by Mary Rack
Scoop.it!

Walled gardens: timeless but ready for new ideas

Walled gardens: timeless but ready for new ideas | Potpourri | Scoop.it
These historic sites have a special appeal for a new generation of gardeners
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Rack from Life in Brazil
Scoop.it!

World Cup Brazil 2014 – The Do’s & Don’ts

World Cup Brazil 2014 – The Do’s & Don’ts | Potpourri | Scoop.it
1/1 Once again our resident travel blogger, Maggie, is back with more tips for you! Maggie runs expatbrazil.co.uk dedicated to providing help and advice on travelling or moving to Brazil Do’s 1. Do eat the street food. It is some of the best food in Brazil and it’s unbelievably cheap. TIP:...

Via expatbrazil.co.uk
more...
Scooped by Mary Rack
Scoop.it!

Weeding the Countryside?

Weeding the Countryside? | Potpourri | Scoop.it
Spotted orchids en masse, I wish I understood how and why they spread Following on from my last post about weeding the garden, specifically a very naturalistic planting (which some folk might think was a mass of weeds anyway), the next task has...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Invasion of America

The Invasion of America | Potpourri | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations (above is a static image of the map; visit the map's page to play with its features).


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:13 AM

In the past I've shared maps that show the historic expansion of the United States--a temporal and spatial visualization of Manifest Destiny.  The difference with this interactive is that the narrative focuses on the declining territory controlled by Native Americans instead of the growth of the United States.  That may seem a minor detail, but how history is told shapes our perception of events, identities and places.

 

Tags: USA, historicalmapping, visualization

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:25 PM

unit 1 Perception and bias of maps

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2014 5:51 AM

This will likely resonate with 'first peoples' everywhere

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty's biggest challenges | Potpourri | Scoop.it
Want to learn more about the issues surrounding poverty in the world today? We ve assembled a collection of some of the best data visualizations for just that.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Erica Senffner's curator insight, June 9, 2014 11:01 AM

Unit 6

Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 10, 2014 6:37 PM

STUDY OF RELIGION - COMPARISONS OF HAVE & HAVE NOTS.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 4:45 PM

APHG-Unit 2

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback?

Esperanto Is Not Dead: Can The Universal Language Make A Comeback? | Potpourri | Scoop.it
A hundred years ago, a Polish physician created a language that anyone could learn easily. The hope was to bring the world closer together. Today Esperanto speakers say it's helpful during travel.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 1, 2015 1:49 PM

Can an invented language designed to be a Lingua Franca be someone's mother tongue?  Of course it can be, even in the accents might carry some regionalized variations.  


Tags: podcast, languageculturetourism,

Cultural Infusion's curator insight, July 15, 2015 7:58 PM

Are there still people who speak Esperanto? Discover it with us!

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | Potpourri | Scoop.it

"In 2006, Panamanians approved a referendum to expand the Panama Canal, doubling its capacity and allowing far larger ships to transit the 100-year-old waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific. Work began in 2007 to raise the capacity of Gatun Lake and build two new sets of locks, which would accommodate ships carrying up to 14,000 containers of freight, tripling the size limit. Sixteen massive steel gates, weighing an average of 3,100 tons each, were built in Italy and shipped to Panama to be installed in the new locks. Eight years and $5.2 billion later, the expansion project is nearing completion. The initial stages of flooding the canals have begun and the projected opening date has been set for April of 2016."


Tag: Panama, images, transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:00 PM

I think that much of Central America is presented in Western media as an extremely violent, backwards region, where narcotics and other "hidden" markets dominate the nation's social, cultural, and political structures. Although there is some truth to this, this rendition not only exaggerates the problems these nations face, but help to reinforce negative stereotypes of the region commonly held by many Americans. A story of progress- such as this story of the Panama canal- is widely ignored, which is a shame. The Panama Canal is one of the most crucial waterways in the world, and expanding it will undoubtedly help the Panamanian economy. Although it initially served as the ultimate symbol of colonialism- the United States caused a war and unrecognizably altered the geography of the region to complete the project- it today serves as a symbol of progress in a region of the world widely ignored. It will be interesting to see the impacts this expansion has on trade in the region, as well as the local geography.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:31 AM

the expanding of the panama canal is a major event, as everything from flow of trade to the maximum size of ships will be impacted by this improvement. the Iowa class of us battleship was two feet then the canal, specifically so they could go through if they needed to.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:11 AM

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms | Potpourri | Scoop.it
American English has a rich history of regionalisms — which sometimes tell us a lot about where we come from.

 

Tags: language, culture, English.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:14 PM

I found this article most interesting, having lived in RI, NJ, GA, IN, MD, and TX. After awhile, you will start to pick up certain words, while dropping other similar words that I have used all of my life. The words and phrases both tend to change from one state to another. Read the article, it is enlightening. Fred Issa,

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gravitational Pull

Gravitational Pull | Potpourri | Scoop.it

"Revolution and rotation are the terms we use to describe the motions of the earth and moon. Revolution is the movement of the earth in an orbit around the sun.  The Earth completes one revolution around the sun every 365 days. The moon revolves around the Earth about once every month." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 14, 2014 2:24 PM

Understanding the relationships between the Sun, Earth and moon are critical for for understanding the seasons, climate and other geographic factors.  This interactive simulates gravity unlike anything I've every seen on a computer screen. 


To exploring Earth-Sun interactions, playing around with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Sun Simulator is a fun way to make a little more sense of the various factors that control how the Sun appears in the sky.

Barbara Goebel's curator insight, December 23, 2014 10:41 AM

Writing prompt: Specify a set of objects to put in motion, have them observe the interactions of the objects, then write to describe. For younger students, supply an observation organizer note sheet. For older students, the descriptions can be as technical as their math understanding will allow. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 2015 9:06 PM

It's pretty simple, the bigger the particle is, the bigger it's atmosphere is to allow more gravity. For example, Jupiter is the largest planet which is in favor to Earth. The reason why is because Jupiter uses it's large mass to protect Earth from oncoming meteors and comets. It uses it's large atmosphere to absorb comets and meteors onto Jupiter instead of allowing them to crash onto Earth. 

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country

Flooding Risk From Climate Change, Country by Country | Potpourri | Scoop.it
A new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world offers more evidence that the brunt of climate change will not be borne equally.

 

More than a quarter of Vietnam’s residents live in areas likely to be subject to regular floods by the end of the century.  Globally, eight of the 10 large countries most at risk are in Asia.  These figures are the result of a new analysis of sea levels and flood risk around the world, conducted by Climate Central and based on more detailed sea-level data than has previously been available.  The analysis offers more evidence that the countries emitting the most carbon aren’t necessarily the ones that will bear the brunt of climate change.  

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, water, disasters, urban ecology, coastal, climate change. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Maria la del Varrio's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:14 PM

In this article the author discusses the risk of flooding in many different locations of the world. He claims about 2.6 percent of the world's populations. That's a big percentage considering all the people of the planet. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 2015 12:10 PM

Flooding is a major risk when it comes to the world we live in especially for Southeast Asia, some areas will be below sea level which shows how the the climate changes are affecting the flood risks caused by global carbon emission. A study from this article shows that eight our of ten of the largest countries will be at the risk of being flooded and below sea level. The major question is how can this carbon emissions be lower? If the carbon is lower then the sea level will rise and less countries will be at risk, this is mainly focusing on Southeast Asia. Yes, we can not change the climate changes but by keeping the land clean and taking care of the environment the flood risk and sea level change could get out of risk level. 

If the weather continues at the rate it is at then about 2.6 percent of the global population which is approximately 177 million people will be living in a place at risk of regular flooding. Flooding can cause a lot of damage to homes, crops and people physically because flooding is not just a little amount of water.

The largest country at risk with people in danger from the map is China, I liked the way this map worked because you can see from the boxes how many people are going to be affected by the flooding. Instead of just having numbers, giving a better visual for people with the boxes and their sizes.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 9:24 PM

It's like watching the land on Earth change right in front of our eyes.  According to this map, if global carbon emissions stay as they currently are and sea levels can be affected about as much as expected, 2.6 million people of the global population will live in a high risk flood zone; this wipes out 177 million people!  

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Charting culture

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:27 AM

CULTURAL UNIT

This amazing youtube video is something we watched in class, and is such a great animation. This video charts hundreds of years of cultural diffusion in a mere five minutes. You can see empires rise and crumple, people die and become born, as well as many other significant dates. This applies to the diffusion patterns of culture, because we can see where people and cultures are going throughout the centuries. 

Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Potpourri | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"

 

This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 12, 2014 11:40 AM

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

Scooped by Mary Rack
Scoop.it!

Hummingbird House | Paradise Valley USA | Colwell Shelor Landscape Architecture

Hummingbird House | Paradise Valley USA | Colwell Shelor Landscape Architecture | Potpourri | Scoop.it
Image Credit | Bill Timmerman
This landscape jewel in a tiny, previously unused space between curving planes of house walls, once a forgotten space, has become a treasured outdoor room, abound with color, form, texture, art and nature.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Rack
Scoop.it!

Forget the world in a peaceful Okinawan island garden - The Japan Times

Forget the world in a peaceful Okinawan island garden - The Japan Times | Potpourri | Scoop.it
Forget the world in a peaceful Okinawan island garden
The Japan Times
Immediately behind the hinpun is a shallow pond with a number of water plants and miniature rocks, creating an effect similar to a large-scale suiseki display.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Rack
Scoop.it!

A Shade Of Relief

A Shade Of Relief | Potpourri | Scoop.it
 At last, my shade house is complete.  I took advantage of a cool Sunday last week to finish attaching the baseboards, stretch the cover, and secure it in place.  A cool Sunday in the late June of Kansas means that by 2:00 p.m.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mary Rack
Scoop.it!

Pleasing Combos, Native or Not

Pleasing Combos, Native or Not | Potpourri | Scoop.it
A recent post by Gaia Gardener about nice combinations of native prairie plants was timely and I made a mental note to blog this combination, of butterfly milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa) and catnip (Nepeta cataria) that sprung up voluntarily in my...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mary Rack from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Silk Road: Connecting the ancient world through trade

"With modern technology, a global exchange of goods and ideas can happen at the click of a button. But what about 2,000 years ago? Shannon Harris Castelo unfolds the history of the 5,000-mile Silk Road, a network of multiple routes that used the common language of commerce to connect the world's major settlements, thread by thread."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 4, 2014 10:02 PM

This TED-ED lesson was produced in part by an AP Human Geography teacher and the strands of geographic thought in this video are evident.  More geographers should make their own TED ED lessons; thanks for blazing the trail Shannon! 


Tags: TED, worldwide, transportation, globalization, diffusion, historical, and video.

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 2014 5:09 PM
Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:51 AM

Great video! Very cool to see how far the world has come in regards to globalization. Technology has allowed the people across the globe to immerse themselves in other cultures and good from other parts of the world.