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Amazing Handwriting Worksheet Maker

Automatically make stunning handwriting worksheets saving you hours of time! Choose from all common printing styles including Block Print - D'Nealian Style - and Cursive Connected Letters.
ethne staniland's insight:

This links to a great website that creates handwriting worksheets. The best part is that you can type the words or sentences that link to your learning topics.

 

1. Choose your font. A colleague of mine uses D’Nealian style.

2. Choose words, sentence or paragraph.

3. Use the Grey box on the left to give the page a heading, type the text, choose the line widths, paper layout and colour.

4. Click print to print the sheet.

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Rescooped by ethne staniland from iPads in Education Daily
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46 Education App Review Sites For Teachers And Students

46 Education App Review Sites For Teachers And Students | Useful teaching links | Scoop.it
Katie and I can't cover the entire education app industry by ourselves. Luckily, there are dozens of other sites specifically devoted to education app reviews for teachers and students.

Via Jon Samuelson
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Dawn Matheson's comment, May 20, 2013 8:29 AM
wow! This is super.
Terry Doherty's curator insight, May 20, 2013 8:32 AM

For those who want eductional products, but don't know how to "decide what's best," bookmark this one!

alice joan's comment, May 20, 2013 9:39 AM
wow,nice app
Rescooped by ethne staniland from Lorraine's Geography SKILLS and ICT
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iPads in Education- Examples from the Classroom

Let's look at the way we use iPads in the classroom. Are there merely a tool to automate traditionally taught tasks?

Via Maree Whiteley, Lorraine Chaffer
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15 Great Video Sites for Educators

15 Great Video Sites for Educators | Useful teaching links | Scoop.it

Some very good video sites for teachers...


Via Steven Engravalle, Jenny Smith, @LearningWheel, juandoming, Ana Rodera, Adriana Marichal, Susan, Ricard Garcia, Lee Hall, Angela Kerr, R.Conrath, Ed.D., Lynnette Van Dyke, Deborah Arnold, Jim Lerman
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Bnahha Langarika's curator insight, May 15, 2013 8:10 PM

Para aprender mas!

Ness Crouch's curator insight, May 23, 2013 4:42 PM

edgalaxy.com has a tag line 'cool stuff for nerdy teachers' this is me all over. Great videos worth spending the time having a look.

Nalya Ovshieva's curator insight, May 26, 2013 5:55 AM

The video sites  will broaden the scope of choices for educators striving to develop materials for students.

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Top 50 Maths Mini Plenaries Ideas To Use In An Outstanding Maths Lesson

Top 50 Maths Mini Plenaries Ideas To Use In An Outstanding Maths Lesson | Useful teaching links | Scoop.it
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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


Via Seth Dixon
ethne staniland's insight:

Not so much for the children but interesting none the less.

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8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 16, 2017 7:55 AM
This article and YouTube clip is talking about the child labor and modern slavery going on in West Africa. These regions are mostly used for cocoa bean plantations and harvesting. The guy leading this investigation also interviews people who are in charge of the chocolate making factories and asks them where the cocoa beans come from. Almost everyone answers, "the Ivory Coast" and have no idea what so ever what is actually going on there. They just order the amount of beans needed and have no clue what children have to go through to provide these people what they need. In this documentary they also interview some of the children having to go through this and it's very terrible and wrong. These children get taken away from their homes to work and get tricked that they're getting payed even though they don't get anything for all they do. In this clip I also get to see what the owners of the cocoa bean plantations say about what's going on and all the lies are just so silly and I cant believe what their thinking and why they're doing this.

This article connects a lot to what we've been working with in class. We even saw this movie about cocoa farms spread all over Wast Africa and this movie basically talked about the same things the other movie talked about. I enjoyed this movie a lot. Even though the information given was very sad and heart breaking I learned a lot of new things about the conditions of these slaves and and what they actually have to go through to please their "master" and how sad their lives are. When seeing this movie I just felt so bad and I just feel like I want to help these people so much.  
Ping Ping W's curator insight, February 15, 11:33 PM

“Although slavery is no longer legal, there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa…”  Even though cocoa drinks are very delicious, have you ever stop to consider where how and who collected them? Here’s how they do it: slavery. It is still very common on cocoa plantations in West Africa. Children are smuggled from all over Africa (Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso, etc), then, they are placed on remote, isolated plantations. Also, thirty-five percent of world’s chocolate is produced by slave labour.

 

This helped me better understand Africa by informing me about how children were kidnapped and force to work...some children work at such a young age too. Before doing this research, I didn’t know how Cocoa even came to be! However, now that I know that children slavery was how cocoa was produced, it made me wonder if the factory knew? All the factory that bought their cocoa from Africa, do they know this is how they’re getting their products? And if they do, why don’t they do anything to stop children slavery or pay the workers at least? I think that cocoa factories in Africa must have really low budgets, or else they wouldn’t be kidnapping kids or adults to do the work in the form of modern slavery (without paying them too). 

Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, June 23, 11:32 AM

The youth are not the only ones that have history and could improve or do things better or just in different way but the older generation also have our cross to bare. As this article i must admit put the fact that not everything that is seen as good come from good reasonings as chacolate is not seen as sinful when we purchase it from the store but to know that atleast some of it got its original origin from thd blood sweat and tears of others thru and by the means of slavery. Just because a thing is not counted as a sin in the eyesight of man it does not make it right to God. Just because slavery is no longer legal does not make it not done and even to the point we can become enslaved in the mindset.  Which is more crippling than the chains of bondage by being physically enslaved by others. 

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GTAV AC:G F to Y2 - Exploring local and more distant places

GTAV AC:G F to Y2 - Exploring local and more distant places | Useful teaching links | Scoop.it
Foundation-People live in places Year 1-Places have distinctive features

Year 2-People are connected to many places

Via Catherine Smyth
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