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Rescooped by Jean-François Kleinfinger from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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EU: Process underway to get insect feed sanctioned for chickens

EU: Process underway to get insect feed sanctioned for chickens | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
The European Commission has indicated 2019 as the target year for authorization to be in place to allow the use of insect protein in poultry feed in Europe.
The EU legal framework was recently revised to allow for insect derived protein to be incorporated into fish feed formulations – that legislation came into force in July of this year. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) opinion, profiling risk linked to insects as food and feed, published in October 2015, supported such a move.

Today, EU Commissioner for Health and Food safety, Vytenis Andriukaitis, opening the conference of the industry consortium, International Platform of Insects for Food and Feed (IPIFF), in Brussels, told delegates the EU executive was focused on changing the regulation regarding insect feed in other segments.

“As a next step, we are working to authorize the use of insect proteins in feed for poultry. This is, however, [conditional] on the availability of an operational laboratory control method. There are some significant technical challenges to overcome in this regard. However, 2019 is the optimistic target we are working towards.” ​

He said the driving forces behind this approach, and the increased focus on insects, is the need for sustainable, high-value animal protein, actions in the context of the circular economy and efforts to boost innovation, growth and new jobs.

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McDonald's championing research into insect feed for chickens

McDonald's championing research into insect feed for chickens | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Global fast food giant, McDonald’s, is exploring the potential of protein derived from both insects and seaweed as alternatives to soy in chicken feed.
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Cargill sees an expansion of its functional fish feed portfolio globally, BioMar evaluating novel proteins

Cargill sees an expansion of its functional fish feed portfolio globally, BioMar evaluating novel proteins | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Some 1,750,000 tons of feed from Cargill’s fish feed mills last year were used in the diets of 30 different type of fish species. One-eighth of that product was functional feeds, aimed at promoting animal health, said the company.
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Enterra receives new approvals to sell sustainable insect ingredients for animal feed in USA, Canada and EU

Enterra receives new approvals to sell sustainable insect ingredients for animal feed in USA, Canada and EU | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
LANGLEY, British Columbia, Feb. 21, 2018 -- Enterra Feed Corporation has received new approvals to sell its insect-based feed ingredients in the United States, Canada and the European Union.
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First insect-fed salmon launched

First insect-fed salmon launched | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Insect producer Protix has introduced the first ever full-grown salmon raised on insect-based proteins.
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Effects of dietary black soldier fly larvae on performance of broilers mediated or not through changes in microbiota | Journal of Insects as Food and Feed

Effects of dietary black soldier fly larvae on performance of broilers mediated or not through changes in microbiota | Journal of Insects as Food and Feed | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Abstract
A total of 40 one-day-old male Ross chickens were individually fed a commercial feed with either 0 or 8% of de-frosted larvae of black soldier flies (BSF; wet weight). We recorded daily body weights and feed intake of each chicken for a period of 13 days. After euthanasia, we visually scored masses of abdominal fat tissues, and lesions and quantity of fat in intestinal villi. We measured percentages of tibia ash. Larvae, their growing substrate, and the caecal content of the chickens were collected for further microbiota characterisation. Statistical analyses included analyses of variance, chi-square tests, partial least square regressions and mediation analyses. We did not observe any significant differences in the overall means of zootechnical measures and in the relative abundances of most bacterial families in the caeca of birds fed insect larvae or not. On the other hand, relative abundances of both Rhodobacteraceae and Bacillaceae were lowest in birds receiving larvae. We identified new, and confirmed previously published, modifications in the chicken phenotypes as gut microbiota composition varied. For example, we observed indirect changes in the average daily gain, feed conversion ratio, tibia ash percentage and abdominal fat score in relation with the introduction of larvae in the diet, changes mediated by the influence of the diet on the relative abundance of Bacillaceae. We suggested presence of Dysgonomonas in larvae and in the growing substrate (after the passage of BSF larvae) may be one of the mechanisms used by the larvae to transform manure because these bacteria have a fermentative metabolism producing acids and no gas.


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BSF larvae have effect on streptococci in gut

BSF larvae have effect on streptococci in gut | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Ghent University researchers looked at the effect of feeding prepupae of the black soldier fly on the gut microbiota of pigs.
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amending Annexes I and IV to Regulation (EC) No 999/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council and Annexes X, XIV and XV to Commission Regulation (EU) No 142/2011 as regards the provisions ...


(3)
Annex IV to Regulation (EC) No 999/2001 extends the prohibition provided for in Article 7(1) to the feeding to non-ruminant farmed animals, with the exception of the feeding to carnivorous fur producing animals, of, inter alia, processed animal protein. However, by way of derogation and under specific conditions, point (c) of Chapter II of Annex IV authorises the feeding of non-ruminant processed animal protein to aquaculture animals only, provided that the processed animal protein and compound feed containing such protein have been produced in compliance with Section D of Chapter IV of Annex IV to Regulation (EC) No 999/2001. This Section currently requires that the animal by-products used for the production of such processed animal protein be derived from slaughterhouses or cutting plants. Given the production process of processed animal protein derived from insects, this requirement cannot be met in the case of insects. As a result, the use of processed animal protein derived from insects in feed for aquaculture animals is currently not allowed.
(4)
In several Member States, the rearing of insects for the production of processed animal protein derived from them and other insect derivatives destined for petfood has started. This production is carried out under the national control schemes of the competent authorities of the Member States. Studies have shown that farmed insects could represent an alternative and sustainable solution to conventional sources of animal proteins destined for feed for non-ruminant farmed animals.
(5)
On 8 October 2015, the EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) published a scientific opinion on a risk profile related to ..."


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Ana C. Day's curator insight, June 12, 2017 7:07 AM

"....... the production and consumption of insects as food and feed (3). As regards the risks related to the presence of prions, EFSA concludes that, compared to the occurrence of .............
(6)
As per the definition of ‘farmed animals’ laid down in Article 3(6) of Regulation (EC) No 1069/2009, insects bred for the production of processed animal protein derived from insects are to.................
(7)
Processed animal protein derived from insects and compound feed containing such processed animal protein should therefore be ............................
By analogy with what is already applicable for processed animal protein derived from non-ruminant animals and compound feed containing such protein destined for feeding aquaculture animals, specific conditions for the...............................
In addition, in the interest of legal certainty, it is appropriate to insert a definition of farmed insects in Annex I to Regulation (EC) No 999/2001.
(10)
Annexes I and IV to Regulation (EC) No 999/2001 should therefore be amended accordingly.
(11)
Annex X to Commission Regulation (EU) No 142/2011 (5) lays down rules for implementing Regulation (EC) No 1069/2009, including parameters for the production of safe feed of ................
The amendment to Regulation (EC) No 999/2001 with a view to authorise processed animal protein derived from insects for feeding aquaculture animals is likely to open the opportunity for bigger production of processed animal protein derived from insects in the U...............
(13)
Annex X to Regulation (EU) No 142/2011 should therefore be amended to add, in Section 1 of its Chapter II, a list of insect species which may be used for the production of processed animal protein obtained from farmed insects. This list ......
(14)
Annex XIV to Regulation (EU) No 142/2011 sets out requirements for the import of animal by-products and derived products from third countries. Safety requirements applicable for growing insects intended to be used in feed for aquaculture animals and for the.........
(15)
Annex XV to Regulation (EU) No 142/2011 lays down model health certificates for the import into the Union of animal by-products. The model health certificate set out in Chapter 1 of Annex XV to that Regulation applies to......"

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Review of U.S. State - Level Entomophagy Regulation 2015

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EU approves insect proteins for use in fishmeal - EU Food Law

Fishmeal producers will be able to use insects as a source of protein from 1 July under a 24 May Commission regulation.

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Screening, Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Genes from Hermetia illucens (L.)

Screening, Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Genes from Hermetia illucens (L.) | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Abstract
Antimicrobial peptides from a wide spectrum of insects possess potent microbicidal properties against microbial-related diseases. In this study, seven new gene fragments of three types of antimicrobial peptides were obtained from Hermetia illucens (L), and were named cecropinZ1, sarcotoxin1, sarcotoxin (2a), sarcotoxin (2b), sarcotoxin3, stomoxynZH1, and stomoxynZH1(a). Among these genes, a 189-basepair gene (stomoxynZH1) was cloned into the pET32a expression vector and expressed in the Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. Results show that Trx-stomoxynZH1 exhibits diverse inhibitory activity on various pathogens, including Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, fungus Rhizoctonia solani Khün (rice)-10, and fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary-14. The minimum inhibitory concentration of Trx-stomoxynZH1 is higher against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria but similar between the fungal strains. These results indicate that H. illucens (L.) could provide a rich source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides. Importantly, stomoxynZH1 displays a potential benefit in controlling antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

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Introduction
The need for safe and effective antimicrobial peptides (AMP) has increased with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains due to excessive use of conventional antibiotics [1]. AMPs are a key factor of the innate immune system of many organisms and play an important role in host-protecting mechanisms from pathogen invasion [2, 3]. Different AMP databases facilitate the screening, identification, and characterization of new antimicrobial peptides [4]. So far, more than 2000 AMPs from vertebrates and invertebrates have been reported according to the antimicrobial peptide database [5].

Although insects lack the specific immune system found in higher animals, they have developed an effective and complex innate immune system obliviously different from the adaptive system of vertebrates [6, 7]. The quick and intensive production of p

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Insect meal for shrimp: New insights

Insect meal for shrimp: New insights | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
New studies in white leg shrimp (L. vannamei) showed that insect meal boosts weight gain, lowers feed conversion ratio and increases the defence mechanisms against EMS.
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Insect proteins could be allowed in pig and poultry feed - EU Food Law

Insect proteins could be allowed in pig and poultry feed - EU Food Law | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
The Commission is likely to allow processed animal protein (PAP) from insects in pig and poultry feed, according to a summary of last month’s key meeting where Member State officials agreed to allow their use in fishmeal.


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North America: Insect-focused coalition looks to expand feed use for bugs

North America: Insect-focused coalition looks to expand feed use for bugs | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
The North American Coalition for Insect Agriculture’s (NACIA) mission​​ seeks to improve collaboration for stakeholders and provide a distinct voice to those looking to grow the use of insects in feed and food.

Producers of insects for use in feed and food products may need help educating clients, consumers and potential producers about the industry, and that is what the new group is trying to address, said Robert Allen, chairman of the NACIA board of directors.

The group is in the process of incorporating and becoming an established educational non-profit.


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Insect protein for sub-Saharan Africa needs a push

Insect protein for sub-Saharan Africa needs a push | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
With the exception of South Africa, rearing, processing and use of insects is still at an experimentation level in sub-Saharan Africa. More research is needed on the technical and economic feasibility of using insects, as the current costs of feed is too high for most African fish and poultry farmers.
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Enterra receives new approvals to sell insect ingredients for animal feed in USA, Canada and EU

Enterra receives new approvals to sell insect ingredients for animal feed in USA, Canada and EU | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Enterra Feed Corporation has received new approvals to sell its insect-based feed ingredients in the United States, Canada and the European Union. The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) in the United States has agreed to Enterra’s request to include Black Soldier Fly Larvae Meal in feed for salmonids, which includes salmon, trout and arctic char, in their list of authorized feed ingredients. The supporting material and the change in the definition was reviewed and supported by FDA. “This is the first time an insect meal product has been approved in North America for the aquaculture industry and we’re excited to be the first to market.”
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Door opening in the EU for insect protein for poultry

Door opening in the EU for insect protein for poultry | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Hopes are rising that the European Commission will next year give the green light for insect proteins to be used in poultry feed.
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Aquaculture: De la farine d’insecte pour nourrir les poissons… Un coup double environnemental ?

Aquaculture: De la farine d’insecte pour nourrir les poissons… Un coup double environnemental ? | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Les fermes de mouches ont le vent en poupe en France depuis que l’Union européenne autorise l’alimentation à base d’insectes pour nourrir les poissons d’élevage. Tant mieux pour la planète ?…
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Farmed insects can produce antimicrobial peptides

Farmed insects can produce antimicrobial peptides | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
A recent study by Vogel et al. (2018) showed that BSFL can produce a broad spectrum of antimicrobial peptides in a substrate-specific manner.
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Growth performance, feed utilization and body composition of advanced nursing Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed diets containing Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae meal

Growth performance, feed utilization and body composition of advanced nursing Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fed diets containing Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae meal | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Abstract

A 32-day experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects on the performance, feed utilization efficiency and body composition of a strategic inclusion of Black Soldier Fly larvae meal (MM) in a commercially formulated diet for advance nursing Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were commercially formulated and manufactured as a control and three test diets with strategic inclusions of MM inclusions (0, 30, 50 and 80 g/kg) and poultry by-product meal substituting gradually three conventional expensive feedstuffs: fish meal, fish oil and soybean meal. Fish (5.7 ± 0.5 g/fish) were nursed in a cage-in-lake system (Volta Lake, Ghana), under conditions similar to commercial farming practices. Control and experimental diets were fed to triplicate cages by hand to visual satiety, six times per day. Growth performance (final weight; weight gain and SGR), feed utilization efficiency indices (FCR and PER) and feed intake were not significantly different (p ≥ .05) between treatments. Survival was significantly different (p < .05) but more likely explained by the stress related to frequent handling on the smaller fish. Fish whole body composition (dry matter, crude protein, lipid, ash and fibre) was unaffected by the treatment (p ≥ .05), except for the fatty acid compositions which mirrored that of the diets.

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Black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) pre-pupae meal as a fish meal replacement in diets for European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

Abstract
A feeding trial was carried out to assess the effect of partially replacing fish meal (FM) by Black soldier fly pre-pupae meal (HM) in diets for European seabass Dicentrarchus labrax juveniles. A FM-based diet was used as a control and three other diets were formulated to include 6.5%, 13%, and 19.5% of HM, replacing 15%, 30% and 45% of FM respectively. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of fish (initial weight: 50 g) for 62 days.

At the end of the trial, there were no differences among groups in growth performance or feed utilization. Plasma metabolic profiles also remained unaffected, except that plasma cholesterol was reduced with dietary HM inclusion. The apparent digestibility coefficients (ADC) of protein, lipids, dry matter, organic matter, and energy were generally high, and not affected by the dietary treatment.

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Bug fixing the law: Regulation of insects as an alternative protein source | Cleantech Group

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Black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) pre-pupae meal as a fish meal replacement in diets for European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

Highlights
•Black soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens) pre-pupae meal (HM) can replace up to 19.5% of fish meal (FM) in diets for European seabass.
•Growth performance and feed utilization were not affect by the dietary inclusion of 19.5% of HM.
•Apparent digestibility coefficients and digestive enzymes activities were not affect by the dietary inclusion of 19.5% of HM.


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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, May 23, 2017 3:43 AM
Part abstract:
""A feeding trial was carried out to assess the effect of partially replacing fish meal (FM) by Black soldier fly pre-pupae meal (HM) in diets for European seabass Dicentrarchus labrax juveniles. A FM-based diet was used as a control and three other diets were formulated to include 6.5%, 13%, and 19.5% of HM, replacing 15%, 30% and 45% of FM respectively. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of fish (initial weight: 50 g) for 62 days. At the end of the trial, there were no differences among groups in growth performance or feed utilization."
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Enterra Receives CFIA Approval to Sell Insect Larvae to Aquaculture Industry

Enterra Receives CFIA Approval to Sell Insect Larvae to Aquaculture Industry | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
LANGLEY, BC--(Marketwired - February 15, 2017) - Enterra Feed Corporation has received approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to sell its Whole Dried Black Soldier Fly Larvae as a feed ingredient for salmonids, including farmed salmon, trout and arctic char. With this approval, the Metro Vancouver-based company is now the first to market and sell this sustainable, natural product to aquaculture feed manufacturers in Canada. This is the first Canadian approval of an insect-based aquaculture feed ingredient, and follows the CFIA's approval using this same product in feed for chicken broilers last year. Enterra received a similar U.S. approval for use in salmonid feeds in 2016.
Canada is the fourth-largest producer of farmed salmon in the world, according to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. In 2015 the farm gate value -- the net value when it leaves the farm -- of salmon and trout in Canada was $850 million1.
"Aquaculture feed producers have been keenly awaiting this approval and we look forward to supplying their needs immediately," said Andrew Vickerson, Chief Technology Officer, Enterra. "Fish eat insects in their natural environment and our product is a healthy, digestible and renewable source of protein and fat that can replace less sustainable ingredients, including fish meal and soybean meal."
Production of fish meal, which is a standard aquaculture feed ingredient, can deplete wild ocean fish stocks and is subject to substantial price fluctuations. Soybean meal requires significant agricultural inputs that could otherwise be used more efficiently to grow food for people.

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Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market Research Report Now Available at Research Corridor

Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market Research Report Now Available at Research Corridor | UsagesBSF | Scoop.it
Research Corridor has published a new research study titled “Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market – Growth, Share, Opportunities, Competitive Analysis and Forecast, 2015 – 2022”. The Edible Insects for Animal Feed market report studies current as well as future aspects of the Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market based upon factors such as market dynamics, key ongoing trends and segmentation analysis. Apart from the above elements, the Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market research report provides a 360-degree view of the Edible Insects for Animal Feed industry with geographic segmentation, statistical forecast and the competitive landscape.

Browse the complete report at http://www.researchcorridor.com/edible-insects-animal-feed-market/

Geographically, the Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market report comprises dedicated sections centering on the regional market revenue and trends. The Edible Insects for Animal Feed market has been segmented on the basis of geographic regions into North America, Europe, Asia Pacific and Rest of the World (RoW). The RoW segment consists Latin America and the Middle East & Africa. The Edible Insects for Animal Feed market has been extensively analyzed on the basis of various regional factors such as demographics, gross domestic product (GDP), inflation rate, acceptance and others. Edible Insects for Animal Feed Market estimates have also been provided for the historical years 2013 & 2014 along with forecast for the period from 2015 – 2022.

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