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Are You Making These Common Website Navigation Mistakes?

Are You Making These Common Website Navigation Mistakes? | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it
The design of the website navigation has a huge impact on results. Here are 5 navigation mistakes and missteps you can avoid, from labels to drop down menus.
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Is Facebook Suffering Because Of Usability Issues?

Is Facebook Suffering Because Of Usability Issues? | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

Here’s a scenario for you to ponder. About 6 years, the groundbreaking social media site MySpace was on top of the world. MySpace enjoyed unprecedented success as an online social networking company largely because there wasn’t any real competition. MySpace might have looked like a cluttered mess of ads slapped onto a hastily designed interface, but that didn’t really stop the company from signing up hundreds of millions of followers.
Then comes Facebook, the social media platform which came out of nowhere in late 2006/early 2007 to take the world by storm. MySpace stood no chance against Facebook, which easily supplanted it as the number one social media network within a few short months of opening its doors to all users.
In my opinion, it was the simplicity and clean aesthetic of Facebook’s layout that ultimately won over the public. Gone were the spammy ads and poorly thought out layout that MySpace got away with for so long—Facebook had a catchy color scheme and an intuitive interface that appealed to most users. The Facebook wall, the ability to tag friends in photos, the way that you could keep tabs on your friend all reflected the fact that Mark Zuckerberg and his designers put a lot of thought into the way that people would use the social media service. This stood in stark contrast to MySpace, which had long since had an aesthetic that basically said, “We don’t need to make this any easier, let the user figure it out.”

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Cool Infographics - Blog - Is Google+ a Ghost Town?

Cool Infographics - Blog - Is Google+ a Ghost Town? | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

Google+, The newest trend? Or the newest flop? Umpf gets to the bottom of this mystery with a little research and reports it’s results with an infographic! The Google+, Ghost Town? infographic does more than just report the Google+ statistics, it compares them to other key social networks.

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The Perils of Search Engine Optimization

Search engine optimization (SEO) tactics often make it harder for customers to do what they need to do.

If Google wanted to get found in Google would it have the homepage it has? No. It would have a homepage with lots of content on it. This content would repeat keywords such as “search engine.” For example, a classic SEO statement would be. “Search with our search engine. We are the best search engine to help you search.”

The above is clever SEO but dumb content. But variants of this dumb content are being produced by a great many sites in order to “get found”. Let’s get back to Google. Today I searched for “search engine” on Google.

The first result was for Wikipedia, then came Dogpile, searchengine.ie, DuckDuckGo, Bing, etc. The Google search engine didn’t appear until the third page of results, which means it might as well be sitting on top of Mount Everest from a search findability perspective.

The Google homepage is absolutely atrociously optimized for search engines, but tremendously well optimized for people who search. The Google design is focused on what the customer wants to do, which is to search and find stuff. Google is not focused on getting itself found but on helping customers find.

Strangely, many websites don’t have that focus. What needs do you satisfy? How well do you satisfy them? These are vital questions to answer.

Yes, it’s important to get found. But what happens after you get found is crucial. From a customer’s point of view, finding a particular website is just the first step in completing a task.

Google wasn’t always popular. Once upon a time it was a totally unknown website run by two students. Its strategy to get found was based on being useful. That’s by far the best philosophy. Let’s focus much more on helping people be successful once they get to our website.

That may mean doing the exact opposite of what many SEO tacticians tell us to do. I have seen many examples of when 80% of the content got deleted from a site; sales jumped, support calls dropped and general customer satisfaction rose significantly.

There’s no point in bringing lots of people to your website if they are going to feel frustrated and annoyed when they get there. You must focus on helping them do what they need to do as quickly as possible. That very often means reducing pages and then stripping as much content as possible out of the pages that remain in order to simplify them.

Of course, it’s not always about removal. I have worked with websites where they didn’t have enough content in particular areas. The larger point here is that we should not focus on the content itself. If Google did that it would have a content rich homepage that would be terrible to use. And if that were the case, we wouldn’t be talking about Google because nobody would be using it.

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SEO At a Glance — Infographic Labs

SEO At a Glance — Infographic Labs | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

An infographic with a couple of good advices on strategic issues to consider for search engine optimisation (SEO).

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How to design web sites for tablets

How to design web sites for tablets | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it
Imagine a website that looks horrible on a tablet. Or worse, doesn’t even actually function.

Oh wait, you don’t have to … because today, two whole years after the iPad picked up the dead tablet industry and whipped it into roaring, raging life, many websites are not optimized for tablets. Even new ones. Shocking? Sure. Unthinkable? Maybe. Unfortunately, however, it’s reality. And it’s not just the obscure little sites, either — try using Google Docs on your iPad for anything other than viewing.

What’s the problem? Sometimes it’s the simple stuff: a site with links and clickable images that are just a little bit too small. Usability guru Jakob Nielsen has skewered this fat-fingered problem, particularly on midsize tables like the Kindle Fire. Not so surprisingly , a design built for a 15″ laptop screen or a 22″ monitor doesn’t always translate well to a 10″ iPad screen, and users have to make liberal use of the standard double-tap protocol to “big-ify” text and navigation. Make this a frequent necessity on your site, and they’ll want to double tap you, too.

Read this article for a couple of useful tips

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Website usability – 10 tips for getting it right

Website usability – 10 tips for getting it right | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it
For a business, there isn’t anything more important than the website when it comes to online marketing. It’s the focal point of your business’ online presence and your success rides on its ability to deliver to visitors a great experience.
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Websites can be so stupid...

Websites can be so stupid... | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

Give your site a job description and take ownership of it. The site itself can’t be stupid, but it is painfully dim-witted to have a site with no clear objective.

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Browser and GUI Chrome (Jakob Nielsen's Alertbox)

'Chrome' is the user interface overhead that surrounds user data and web page content. Although chrome obesity can eat half of the available pixels, a reasonable amount enhances usability.
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6 Tips to Rank High in Google's Search Engine

6 Tips to Rank High in Google's Search Engine | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

Search engines such as Google are seen as black boxes that hand out page one search rankings for websites and blogs based upon secret and mysterious calculations. In essence that is true.
Hundreds of scientists and mathematicians are constantly working in quiet rooms to increase the artificial intelligence of its search engine.
Some search engine optimisation experts have used devious means to try and trick Google into getting ranked high in search results. This has been done via tactics such as “Black Hat SEO” that are used to try and fool Google. Google doesn’t encourage these activities and is constantly fine tuning its search algorithms to eliminate these practices.
Google’s objectives is to ensure that it is always delivering search results that users find relevant, interesting and also timely. If they don’t keep doing this then people will stop using Google and then its $30 billion of revenue it earns off search advertising is under threat. Also breathing down its neck are rapidly growing social sites such as Facebook that indirectly are providing alternatives to Google (rumours are constantly circulating that Facebook is building its own social search engine). If Google doesn’t continue to deliver then its whole existence is heading for a slippery downward slope of Web extinction.
In the last 2 years Google has increased the importance of usability such as measuring the speed of websites and sites that are producing unique content , hence the targeting of content farms and de-ranking them.

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Cool Infographics - Blog - How Much Does SEO Cost?

Cool Infographics - Blog - How Much Does SEO Cost? | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

How Much Does SEO Cost? is generally a mystery in the online marketing world. The range is certainly big, from under $50/month up to the unbelievable price of over $250,000/month! This informative infographic shares the results of custom research from SEOmoz, and was designed by AYTM.

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The 3 Worst Ways to Use Social Media to Grow Your Business (And What You Should Do Instead) | Social Media Today

The 3 Worst Ways to Use Social Media to Grow Your Business (And What You Should Do Instead) | Social Media Today | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it
To understand and adapt to these changes, "social media experts" popped up to help organization's evolve their marketing communications accordingly.

But while their intentions might be good, their results aren't. Because having more Twitter followers and a high Klout score won't necessarily help you get more website traffic, bring in more qualified leads or increase sales.

The tools and technology may have changed. But the underlying marketing principles still apply.

Here are 3 of the worst ways to use social media to grow your business, and what you should do instead.

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Bounce Rate Demystified — Infographic Labs

Bounce Rate Demystified — Infographic Labs | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

According to Wikipedia, a bounce occurs when a web site visitor only views a single page on a website, that is, the visitor leaves a site without visiting any other pages before a specified session-timeout occurs. There is no industry standard minimum or maximum time by which a visitor must leave in order for a bounce to occur. Rather, this is determined by the session timeout of the analytics tracking software. See this infographic to understand it better.

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12 Typography Guidelines for Good Website Usability | Usability Geek

12 Typography Guidelines for Good Website Usability | Usability Geek | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

The following is a list of 12 practical typography guidelines which will help you improve the overall usability of your website:
1. Keep the number of fonts used at a minimum: Using a lot of fonts (more than 3 different fonts) makes a web site look unstructured and unprofessional
2. Use sans serif fonts instead of serif for content: Sans serif fonts are more suited for the screen than serif fonts which are better suited for headings and print
3. Ensure that proper text and text size is used: It is recommended that Arial Trebuchet and Georgia are at 10pts+, Times New Roman at 12pts+ whilst Comic Sans and Impact fonts are not used
4. Content must make use of mixed capitalisation: Having all text in caps or small caps makes it difficult for the user to read and scan it. All caps text makes a web site look unprofessional and untrustworthy
5. Use standard fonts for web site fonts: Users are more familiar with standard fonts and can thus read them faster
6. Character spacing should not be minimised: Altering the character spacing to fit in more text, makes it more dense and difficult to scan
7. Limit the use of different colours for fonts: When text is over-designed, it affects its meaning. Additionally, users may mistake over-designed text for adverts. Thus it is recommended that 4 different colours or less are used to colour text
8. Do not use blue for content: Users associate blue text with links and can thus try and click on it
9. Avoid colouring text in red or green: Since colour blindness is a common condition, especially amongst men (8% of men are colour blind), it is advisable to always use other cues in addition to colour to distinguish important text. It is also advisable to avoid the use of red and green since red and green colour blindness is the most common form of colour blindness
10. Do not use the same or similar colours for text and background: The more visible the text, the faster users are able to scan and read it
11. Numbers having 5 digits or more should have a thousand separator: The thousands separator makes it easier for users to quickly scan and interpret numbers
12. Do not use moving or blinking text: Although the technologies with which they are implemented has changed, these techniques that have been with us since the early days of the web are still found in some web sites. Their objective is still the same – to draw the users’ attention. However, they convey an unprofessional image and may lead to users leaving the web site.

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Responsive Design and Mobile First – Look Before You Leap | J. Boye

Responsive Design and Mobile First – Look Before You Leap | J. Boye | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it
One of the biggest problems that we see in Responsive Design techniques relates to “responsive images”. Images are one of the greatest sources of page weight and how to properly handle images within Responsive templates is still very immature.

For instance, if you are hiding a large, hi-res banner image in smaller viewports or switching to a smaller resolution, there is no way to load only the image you want (or not load one at all) without broken markup or server-side help (which usually means employing the dreaded user-agent detection approach). Obviously we could inject the images via JavaScript at run time, but that is not proper for the semantic web and a true standards-based approach to HTML development.

There is right now a hotly contested debate going on between some of the top front end developers in the world and the browser developers (lots of super smart web people much smarter than me). Everyone is looking for a solution on how we should group sets of images and have the browser only download that which is needed at the moment depending on screen size, pixel density, bandwidth, and so on.

For instance, if the small, mobile viewport only really needs a 50 x 50 pixel image, why serve the 200 x 200 pixel image and scale it down in the browser? Why rely on browser sniffing to determine viewport size (which of course it does not work well and that is but one of many issues with browser sniffing for mobile devices)? How do we adapt to high density displays such as the iPhone 4 or Samsung Galaxy Nexus? How about scaling based on bandwidth standards that are forthcoming from the W3C?

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Make your websites "built-to-share"

Make your websites "built-to-share" | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it
Today, many organisations are still busy building websites that are built-to-last. At every attempt to introduce new technology or a sparkling new design, best efforts are made to put something robust in place for as long as possible. As many web professionals have recognized, a web site won’t last. There seems to be a clear disconnect between the common managerial perception of the corporate website as something static, while the web team recognizes that to make best use of the Web, you should frequently improve your web pages as you learn along the way. The problem is that built-to-change websites don’t go far enough and have their own particular set of problems.
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Should links be underlined?

Should links be underlined? | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it

Speaking of PDFs, they are generally not a good idea. They are often a lazy way of publishing, a quick and dirty way of getting print content up on the Web. PDFs are not a web format. They are a way of delivering print content using the Web as a distribution channel. If your website is full of PDFs then your organization is probably still living in the print world. Your website will almost definitely be less effective.

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5 Signs That Indicate Website Usability Problems

5 Signs That Indicate Website Usability Problems | Usability - ThatWay.eu | Scoop.it
Five signs can be considered as indicators that your website has poor usability.
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