Low Power Heads Up Display
3.2K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Richard Platt
onto Low Power Heads Up Display
Scoop.it!

Google Glass makes is way into operating rooms - ZME Science

Google Glass makes is way into operating rooms - ZME Science | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Since then, he has already performed 12 surgeries using the aid of Google Glass, to great results; before, they had to manually load the images after manually scrubbing them of personal information, so that they could ...
Richard Platt's insight:

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): Now Google Glass in the operating room, this is the 1st of many applications that we have seen and can expect to see w/ HUD technology for industrial, military, extreme hazardous environments / dangerous work, medical, and consumer applications

more...
No comment yet.
Low Power Heads Up Display
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Richard Platt from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

Getting into Virtual Reality Part 1: Creating Virtual Reality Worlds

Getting into Virtual Reality Part 1: Creating Virtual Reality Worlds | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Now another ten years on VR seems to be making another surge into the mainstream consumer market and the field of education. Whether it’s here to stay or not largely depends on how accessible edtech companies can make this to mainstream teachers and classrooms around the world and the ability of edtech companies to provide experiences that have genuine educational outcomes that match the kind of investment that will be necessary to enable students to access those experiences.

Via Nik Peachey
Richard Platt's insight:

Now another ten years on VR seems to be making another surge into the mainstream consumer market and the field of education. Whether it’s here to stay or not largely depends on how accessible edtech companies can make this to mainstream teachers and classrooms around the world and the ability of edtech companies to provide experiences that have genuine educational outcomes that match the kind of investment that will be necessary to enable students to access those experiences.

more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, December 7, 7:41 AM

Some free tools and resources to create virtual reality worlds and experiences.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, December 11, 1:18 AM
Getting into Virtual Reality Part 1: Creating Virtual Reality Worlds
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

VR Research Ushers in Aviation Advances

VR Research Ushers in Aviation Advances | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
The use of virtual reality is helping create new aviation advancements like intelligent autopilot systems and advanced cockpit design.
Richard Platt's insight:

In the past 25 years, airlines and the amount of flights per day have risen considerably. In the EU, the number of flights has risen from 360 million in 1993 to almost a billion this year. In the U.S., there are 5,000 aircraft in the sky at any given time, and in 2016 the FAA handled 42,700 flights daily.  As the volume of air traffic continues to rise, experts across the aerospace industry, including companies like Honeywell and the German Aerospace Center, have teamed up to introduced advanced virtual reality (VR)-based autopilot systems. These autopilot systems will help offset the high workload and the burden of stress on pilots.  The A-PiMod is an EU-funded project that introduces sophisticated software into the cockpit. The software makes recommendations based on the conditions of the aircraft and that of the pilot. It can measure eye movement, gestures, and inputs from the pilot, which allows it to draw conclusions concerning their stress levels. Based on the current workload, it can make suggestions to the pilot adapted for the current situation. It cannot override the pilot’s decisions, but rather, make suggestions to the crew on which tasks they should perform themselves and when the autopilot should take over.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

BMW and Porsche join forces to enable 15-min electric car charging at 450 kW charge rate

BMW and Porsche join forces to enable 15-min electric car charging at 450 kW charge rate | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
BMW and Porsche are already working together and with other major automakers, like Mercedes and Ford, on the major Ionity ultra-fast (350 kW) electric car charging network in Europe. But now they w…
Richard Platt's insight:

BMW and Porsche are already working together and with other major automakers, like Mercedes and Ford, on the major Ionity ultra-fast (350 kW) electric car charging network in Europe.

But now they want to lay a path to improve that charge rate to 450 kW in order to enable quicker electric car charging.  BMW is leading the project through the ‘FastCharge’ consortium in partnership with other companies, like Porsche, Allego, Siemens and others. Interestingly, the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure supports the project with a  € 7.8 million grant, which is supervised by the National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Organization (NOW). They have now confirmed that the bulk of their research will focus on improving charging rates using the existing Combined Charging System (CCS), but at a voltage of 900 volts and an amplitude of 500 amperes for a charge rate of 450 kW.  The group sees this charge rate as ideal to charge an average long-range electric car in about 15 mins.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Sci-Fi Inspired Wearable Provides Hands-Free Solutions for MRO Workers

Sci-Fi Inspired Wearable Provides Hands-Free Solutions for MRO Workers | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Star Wars inspired head-mounted wearable aids MRO diagosis
Richard Platt's insight:

The RealWear HMT-1 can be worn with a helmet and safety glasses as it delivers computing power and remote collaboration functionality.  RealWear credits part of the design’s inspiration to Boba Fett’s helmet from the Star Wars movies, which—like the HMT-1—has a monocular display for visual data that can be flipped up when not in use. RealWear’s VP of industrial design and human factors, Stephen Pombo, previously worked with one of the original designers of Boba Fett’s prop helmet to create a monocular headset patent at technology company Kopin before going on to develop the HMT-1’s predecessor.  While wearing the HMT-1, workers can use voice commands to browse and search technical documentation or instructions, which are stored on the wearable’s microSD card and can be synced from the cloud using Wi-Fi. The wearable’s rugged design includes noise cancellation and multiple microphones, which is designed to ensure that field workers can be heard in loud environments while using the wearable’s remote collaboration functionality. This allows experts to watch a procedure taking place via live HD video stream from the wearable’s camera. The remote expert can communicate with the field worker through the audio channel and capture images from the camera, zoom in on details and annotate an image using a pen tablet.  “When a malfunction occurs in an airport distant from the maintainers that have the knowledge to repair it, they are able to dial in to a local maintenance engineer with software like Librestream’s Onsite remote collaboration to diagnose and fix the problem,” says RealWear CEO and Founder Andy Lowery. According to Lowery, the company is working with a major producer of commercial jets to equip each aircraft with an HMT-1 for collaboration functionality like this.   “The most popular applications we integrate and deploy are remote collaboration apps, such as Onsight, workflow applications, such as Frontline, and industrial IoT visualization applications, such as ThingWorx,” says Lowery. Software is installed on the HMT-1 via Wi-Fi or a USB cable connected to a desktop computer, much like it would be with a device like a tablet. RealWear says basic functionality, such as document reading or the recording and playback of training videos, can be done right out of the box.   According to RealWear, benefits of the HMT-1 include increases in productivity and safety, error reduction, and time and cost savings. Lowery says just one use of the HMT-1 will return savings to an airline worth ten times what they would pay for the device. The company has an adaptive pricing model and available leasing programs, but says the cost to buy an HMT-1 and try it out would be $1,500 plus freight. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Tesla’s new second-generation Roadster would be the fastest production car ever made

Tesla’s new second-generation Roadster would be the fastest production car ever made | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
"Period."
Richard Platt's insight:

The second-generation Tesla Roadster came to an abrupt halt, and a grinning Elon Musk came back on the mic to introduce his latest baby, which will likely cause Porsche and Ferrari to break a sweat.  Musk claimed the base model will do zero to 60 in 1.9 seconds, which if true would make it the first time a production vehicle cracked the 2-second threshold. He also said the new Roadster would climb from 0 to 100 mph in 4.2 seconds, and will clear the quarter mile in 8.9 seconds (in case the Fast & Furious drag race franchise comes calling.)

“It’ll be faster than that jet over there,” Musk quipped, as an airplane soared over the exultant crowd crammed into Tesla’s Hawthorne, California facility.  Musk said he wouldn’t confirm the top speed, but hinted that it was “above 250 mph.” By comparison, the Agera RS by Sweden’s Koenigsegg currently holds the world record at 277.9 mph.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Fisker claims solid-state battery ‘breakthrough’ for electric cars with ‘500 miles range and 1 min charging’

Fisker claims solid-state battery ‘breakthrough’ for electric cars with ‘500 miles range and 1 min charging’ | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
When Henrik Fisker relaunched its electric car startup last year, he announced that their first car will be powered by a new graphene-based hybrid supercapacitor technology, but he later announced …
Richard Platt's insight:

Solid-state batteries are thought to be a lot safer than common li-ion cells and could have more potential for higher energy density, but they also have limitations, like temperature ranges, electrode current density, and we have yet to see a company capable of producing it in large-scale and at an attractive price point competitive with li-ion.  Now Fisker announced that they are patenting a new solid-state electrode structure that would enable a viable battery with some unbelievable specs.

Here’s what they claim (via GreenCarCongress):

“Fisker’s solid-state batteries will feature three-dimensional electrodes with 2.5 times the energy density of lithium-ion batteries. Fisker claims that this technology will enable ranges of more than 500 miles on a single charge and charging times as low as one minute—faster than filling up a gas tank.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from GAMIFICATION & SERIOUS GAMES IN HEALTH by PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

Study shows VR could help children manage pain, anxiety at the doctor's office #digitalhealth

Study shows VR could help children manage pain, anxiety at the doctor's office #digitalhealth | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Virtual reality can help children to manage pain without the use of drugs, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology in October. The study, which used VR during blood drawing at the Los Angeles Children’s Hospital, found that using VR significantly reduced acute procedural pain and anxiety in patients compared to using the standard of care.

The study also reported that patients who reported being more fearful of physiological sensations related to anxiety benefited more from the VR treatment. 

“The integration of technology, specifically virtual reality, in the context of health care, has far-reaching implications for acute and chronic disease in children and adults,” author of the study Jeffrey Gold said in an email MobiHealthNews. “In particular, the current findings reflect the capacity of VR to minimize pain and anxiety in children undergoing blood draw. Generations of patients have needle fear and VR may have the capacity to reduce that phobia. Additionally, reduced needle phobia may lead to greater medical adherence and improved patient satisfaction with their overall medical treatment experience.”

The study was comprised of 143 pediatric patients, plus their caregivers and their phlebotomists.

Via Annick Valentin Smith, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

The study also reported that patients who reported being more fearful of physiological sensations related to anxiety benefited more from the VR treatment.  “The integration of technology, specifically virtual reality, in the context of health care, has far-reaching implications for acute and chronic disease in children and adults,” author of the study Jeffrey Gold said in an email MobiHealthNews. “In particular, the current findings reflect the capacity of VR to minimize pain and anxiety in children undergoing blood draw. Generations of patients have needle fear and VR may have the capacity to reduce that phobia. Additionally, reduced needle phobia may lead to greater medical adherence and improved patient satisfaction with their overall medical treatment experience.”  The study was comprised of 143 pediatric patients, plus their caregivers and their phlebotomists.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Pioneering Virtual Reality and New Video Technologies in Journalism

Pioneering Virtual Reality and New Video Technologies in Journalism | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Marcelle Hopkins, deputy video editor and co-director of virtual reality, traces The Times’s push into V.R. and other visual technologies.
Richard Platt's insight:

Video has changed a lot in recent years. How have you and the video department incorporated new video technologies, and what technologies has the department helped pioneer for journalism?   Journalists and technologists from various parts of The Times started experimenting with virtual reality a few years ago. We launched NYT VR in November 2015 with the publication of the V.R. documentary “The Displaced” (about three children displaced by war) and the distribution of more than one million Google Cardboard headsets to our subscribers. Since then, we’ve produced more than 20 V.R. films, and we learn a lot with each one.  Last year, we launched The Daily 360, a series that produces a 360-degree video from somewhere in the world every day. The volume and cadence of daily publication accelerated our learnings in V.R. It allowed us to quickly iterate on a young storytelling form, train our journalists in a new reporting tool and introduce immersive journalism to a broad Times audience.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Coming Soon to AMC Theaters: Virtual Reality Experiences

Coming Soon to AMC Theaters: Virtual Reality Experiences | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
The theater chain has invested $20 million in the start-up Dreamscape Immersive and will open six locations offering V.R. experiences in the next 18 months.
Richard Platt's insight:

Just used the Regal Cinema's "Experience" (3-D glasses with Sensurround stereo and vibrating reclining chairs 2 weeks ago) watching BladeRunner 2049, pretty cool technology applied to entertainment, but it needs to be tweaked a little to be made better and more immersive.  However this article is really talking about the next generation film as a medium entertainment that is using integrated technology to create an immersive experience for theater goers  -- Steven Spielberg was an early investor. So were 21st Century Fox, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Warner Bros. The venture’s leadership team includes the former chief of Disney’s theme park design division; the producer of the “Men in Black” movie series; and a live event kingpin.  And now AMC Entertainment, the world’s largest theater chain, has invested $20 million in the fledgling company and agreed to finance the rapid roll-out of its product in the United States and Britain.  The fuss is over Dreamscape Immersive, which has been working in a warehouse here for the last year and a half on what it calls a “virtual-reality multiplex.” Instead of a variety of movies, Dreamscape Immersive locations will offer a variety of virtual-reality experiences. Its technology, developed by a Swiss motion-capture firm, allows up to six people to explore a virtual-reality environment at once, seeing fully rendered avatars of one another.  “We were mesmerized by what we saw,” said Adam Aron, chief executive of AMC Entertainment. “Their vision is to change what V.R. has been — away from just a heightened level of video game and toward cinematic storytelling — and we think it’s what consumers have been waiting for.”   The AMC deal, which brings total investment in Dreamscape to more than $40 million, calls for up to six Dreamscape locations to open over the next 18 months. Some will be inside existing AMC theaters, and some will be stand-alone centers nearby. Additionally, Dreamscape will open a flagship location in the first quarter of next year at the Westfield Century City mall in Los Angeles. Westfield is another Dreamscape investor.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Facebook's latest bombshell: The $200 wireless VR headset

Facebook's latest bombshell: The $200 wireless VR headset | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Facebook dropped a bombshell on the virtual reality world Wednesday: a $200 virtual reality headset that doesn't require wires or a smartphone to work. The headset could go a long way to helping Facebook get virtual reality into the hands of a "a billion people" -- a (timeframe-free) goal set by CEO Mark Zuckerberg.
Richard Platt's insight:

Facebook dropped a bombshell on the virtual reality world Wednesday: a $200 virtual reality headset that doesn't require wires or a smartphone to work. The headset could go a long way to helping Facebook get virtual reality into the hands of a "a billion people" -- a (timeframe-free) goal chief executive Mark Zuckerberg set Wednesday at a developers conference hosted by its VR company Oculus. Virtual reality has been a major focus for Facebook and other major tech firms such as Microsoft and HTC, but consumers haven't been quite as enthusiastic. The new headset, however, addresses two major problems analysts have said stand in the way of adoption: high prices and a complicated setup process.  The price of virtual reality headsets has continued to drop, making the technology more accessible to a variety of people. Setting a $200 price for a headset that doesn't require any additional equipment, however, is a new landmark for the industry.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

How One Life Hack From A Self-Made Billionaire Leads To Exceptional Success

How One Life Hack From A Self-Made Billionaire Leads To Exceptional Success | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Countless books and articles have been written about Warren Buffett. Surprisingly few have been written about his business partner of over 40 years, Charlie Munger. Munger has stayed out of the…
Richard Platt's insight:

Being an expert-generalist allows individuals to quickly adapt to change. Research shows that they:

  1. See the world more accurately and make better predictions of the futurebecause they are not as susceptible to the biases and assumptions prevailing in any given field or community.
  2. Have more breakthrough ideas, because they pull insights that already work in one area into ones where they haven’t been tried yet.
  3. Build deeper connections with people who are different than them because of understanding of their perspectives.
  4. Build more open networks, which allows them to serve as a connector between people in different groups. According to network science research, having an open network is the #1 predictor of career success
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Electric Cars Could Wreak Havoc on Oil Markets Within a Decade

Richard Platt's insight:

There are more than one billion cars on the road worldwide today, and only one tenth of one percent of them have a plug. OPEC contends that even in the year 2040, EVs will make up just one percent. But don't be so sure. By 2020, some electric cars and SUVs will be faster, safer, cheaper, and more convenient than their gasoline counterparts. What if people just stop buying oil? In the first episode of our animated series, Sooner Than You Think, Bloomberg's Tom Randall does the math on when oil markets might be headed for the big crash.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Google reveals new Daydream View VR headset for $99

Google reveals new Daydream View VR headset for $99 | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Google has a new holster to turn your smartphone into a virtual reality head-mounted display. During the company’s hardware event today in San Francisco, Google showed off its refined Daydream View that will sell for $99. This is an update to last year’s $80 View, which turned the Pixel smartphone into a headset.
Richard Platt's insight:

Tuesday, Microsoft announced it had acquired the AltspaceVR team as part of its push into mixed reality, it is working with Samsung on the Odyssey mixed reality headset, and integration with SteamVR (meaning its library of apps and games will work with this device). Microsoft dubs mixed reality headsets as gear that can work with VR or AR.  Right now, AR appears to on the rise, thanks to Apple’s ARKit and Google’s ARCore. These work with hundreds of millions of devices people already own, whereas VR right now requires pricey headsets and PCs powerful enough to run the software for this new reality.

Is Microsoft trying to play it safe by making devices that run AR and VR? Or does the Windows and Xbox company get that marrying these options together will produce a transformative technology, one that does more than either VR or AR can do alone?  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearables Are Pushing Forward the Construction Industry

Wearables Are Pushing Forward the Construction Industry | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
BIM (Building Information Modeling) is a big trend in the construction industry. BIM captures the whole lifecycle of real estate, an industrial building or the
Richard Platt's insight:

BIM (Building Information Modeling) is a big trend in the construction industry. BIM captures the whole lifecycle of real estate, an industrial building or the infrastructure around it – from the scratch to the maintenance, and over the next decade. Before anyone starts to work in the real environment, the whole project is captured and designed in 3D. Every cable, every element, and even the energy consumption is figured out by a collaborative database. Of course, using VR and AR solutions to visualize the 3D models has a huge impact on the daily work of the AEC industry.

WT: In a nutshell – Why should we use Wearables in the construction industry?
WW: I see two areas where Wearables may provide significant benefits to the construction industry. Construction is inherently dangerous and physically demanding, very often under harsh environmental conditions. First, monitoring environmental conditions, health parameters, and overall activity may help detect unsafe conditions. Secondly, tracking location and movement of workers (as well as machinery and moving objects) allows us to sound the alarm if danger zones are penetrated. In combination, those applications of wearables could significantly increase worker wellbeing and reduce the number and severity of injuries and accidents.

WT: You are offering an AR solution for holographic visualization of 3D house designing. Along the supply chain of the building lifecycle, who can work with it and what are the benefits? In addition, from your point of view, what are we yet to see in the future?
WW: Today, Holographic Visualization and Augmented Reality are almost exclusively used in design and planning, as well as marketing and sales of real estate, predominantly for larger projects. We also see a strong demand for using our products for public outreach, presentation and communication of project plans to government officials and regulatory agencies. As technologies mature, we already see a strong demand for using our technology during construction and later for facility management purposes. With companies like Apple, Google and Microsoft investing heavily in lower-cost consumer hardware, one can expect a progression towards smaller construction projects in areas like interior design, landscaping, etc.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Power to the people: Tesla mega-battery goes online

Richard Platt's insight:

The world’s biggest lithium-ion battery has begun dispatching power into Australia’s energy grid, delivering on an audacious promise by Tesla’s Elon Musk to build the storage solution within 100 days or provide it for free.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

VA Failed to Protect Patients from Inept Docs

VA Failed to Protect Patients from Inept Docs | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
A new report criticizes medical leaders of the VA for failing to follow their own policies for reporting incompetent health care providers.
Richard Platt's insight:

In one of the most disturbing recent audits of VA health care, a new Government Accountability Office report criticizes medical leaders at all levels of the Department of Veterans Affairs for failing to follow their own policies for reporting incompetent and unprofessional health care providers to state licensing boards and a National Practitioner Data Bank, routine steps to protect patients from harm.  At a House hearing Wednesday, VA acknowledged years of lax oversight by VA medical center directors, regional supervisors and top leaders. But Dr. Gerard R. Cox, a retired Navy physician who last month was named VA’s acting deputy undersecretary for health for organizational excellence, told lawmakers VA accepts GAO’s findings and recommendations and vowed reforms are underway.

Randall Williamson, GAO’s director of health care, told the House veterans affairs subcommittee on oversight and investigations that auditing teams visited only five of 170 VA medical centers to determine compliance with policies that require directors to report providers subject to adverse actions because of unsafe clinical practices or unprofessional conduct. Medical centers are required to share the names of providers they discipline or fire to the National Practitioner Data Bank and to appropriate state medical licensing agencies.  What GAO found, said Williamson, was a “variety of disturbing problems with how these processes are being carried out.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wi-Fi glasses help blind Shelton sisters get around

Wi-Fi glasses help blind Shelton sisters get around | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Twin sisters in Shelton who were born blind are using a new technological assistive device from California's Aira company to do things like read restaurant menus and navigate tight spaces.
Richard Platt's insight:

Barbara Lombardi and Betsey Doane -- who were both born blind -- use pairs of Wi-Fi connected glasses, capable of contacting Aira agents for assistance with tasks that require another set of eyes.  The devices are designed for the blind and people with very low vision. They include cameras that the agents can access.  The sisters, ham radio operators for roughly the past six decades, say that before they began using Aira's glasses their communications were solely by touch and sound. "It's life-changing, absolutely life-changing," says Doane, who is a professor at Housatonic Community College. "I was at a conference recently...and I navigated the hotel. There were 1,600 teachers, and of course I had some help, but really I just navigated fine."  Aira released the devices this year. The Shelton sisters are among more than 1,000 people in the country who use the service so far.  "It's the freedoms we've never known," Lombardi says. "It's fantastic."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Elon Musk Has Unveiled Tesla's All-Electric Semitruck

Elon Musk Has Unveiled Tesla's All-Electric Semitruck | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
The latest electric vehicle in Musk's plan to save the planet.
Richard Platt's insight:

The Truck for the Job

Musk believes that going after the big boys is the best way to have a real impact on climate change. In the five years since Tesla started producing its Model S sedan, it has sold about 200,000 cars. The US has more than 250 million passenger cars on the road, making the impact of this, roughly, zero. Even if Tesla scales up production of its “affordable” Model 3 sedan, it will still be a very long time before the Silicon Valley automaker can change the way humanity moves about enough for any dip in emissions to register as more than a blip.

 

Trucks offer a more effective way to do that, because they are particularly toxic. “Heavy-duty vehicles make up a small fraction of the vehicles on the road, but a large fraction of their emissions,” says Jimmy O’Dea, who studies clean vehicles at the Union of Concerned Scientists. In California, that category (which includes buses as well as trucks) accounts for 7 percent of total vehicles, but produces 20 percent of transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions and a third of all NOx emissions (those are the ones linked to asthma attacks and respiratory illnesses).

Every truck you move with electricity instead of diesel has an outsize effect on the health of the planet and everything living on it. 18-wheelers are the ultimate force multiplier.

Musk has done the math. And while lots of players are moving into electric trucking space, none have the star power of Tesla, the kind of clout that makes the whole country pay attention.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Platt from GAMIFICATION & SERIOUS GAMES IN HEALTH by PHARMAGEEK
Scoop.it!

How virtual reality is helping scientists make new discoveries about our health #digitalhealth

How virtual reality is helping scientists make new discoveries about our health #digitalhealth | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Caroline Stefani has a cool job: She works at the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason in Seattle, looking for new ways to treat diseases like…

Via Florian Morandeau, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:

It’s not easy. In fact, it turns out a lot of scientists have a hard time wrapping their minds around the tiny, three dimensional structures that they work with every day, like cells and proteins.

Luckily, Stefani’s office is right next door to Tom Skillman, who leads Benaroya’s research technology efforts. Talking with Stefani over drinks one evening, Skillman had an idea: using data from microscopes, he could build a full 3D model of the cells she studies — in virtual reality.  A year later, the lab that Stefani works in has a fully-operational VR program that lets her and other researchers see their work like never before. It’s just one of many ways that virtual and augmented reality are making waves in the world of medicine and medical research.  Adam Lacy-Hulbert, who runs the lab Stefani works in, says the program gets to the heart of a scientist’s work. Although it can seem flashy, medical research mostly means trying the same thing over and over — and over — again.

more...
Florian Morandeau's curator insight, November 9, 2:40 AM

Using virtual reality for 3D models of the cells.

Rescooped by Richard Platt from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

German OEMs Plan 350 kW Fast Charging Network Across Europe

German OEMs Plan 350 kW Fast Charging Network Across Europe | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Up-to-date technical analysis of emerging electric vehicle technology.

Via TechinBiz
more...
Jean-Christophe Lévêque's curator insight, November 14, 5:00 AM

Des solutions de charge rapide pour les voitures électriques #MBAMCI

Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Virtual Reality on the Cheap? Try These Apps on Your Phone

Virtual Reality on the Cheap? Try These Apps on Your Phone | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
A variety of apps, some using Google’s Cardboard viewer, allow users to sample films and games with 3-D imagery.
Richard Platt's insight:

Start with the Within app, which is a free iOS and Android download. It uses so-called 360-degree video technology, which is similar to virtual reality and lets you look at a video in every direction and to interact with and explore a movie scene.

Within works like this: Imagine you are watching a regular film on your phone — with a point of view decided by where the filmmaker was pointing a camera. In the app, you can move your phone around in the air, looking all around and up and down, as you slide your viewpoint all around the scene, seeing the actors and the set wrapping all around you.   It’s almost as if you were there standing among the actors. At first it may feel unnerving, and you may find yourself bumping into things in your real-life room. But you will be mesmerized.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Virtual Reality Gets Naughty

Virtual Reality Gets Naughty | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
With 240-degree views, headsets and “sweet, musty scents,” a new kind of pornography offers a realism that is exciting to some, disturbing to others.
Richard Platt's insight:

 Virtual reality uses many camera lenses to record the same scene from hundreds of angles. When the takes are stitched together, the viewer gets a 180- or 240-degree view of the room and the feeling that he or she is there, participating. As soon as Ms. Darling viewed the scene she recorded, she knew virtual reality would be a sea change to her job and the adult-entertainment industry.   In early 2014 Ela Darling, 31, a pornographic actress, recorded her first virtual reality sex scene. She was in a college dorm room at the University of Maryland dressed in an R2-D2 swimsuit and high athletic socks. She sat on a twin bed, next to a wooden desk, and spoke to the camera as if it were a real person. There was no story line and no other actors.

“It was a solo masturbation scene,” she said. “I was coy and flirty and then a little bit dirty. I felt sexy as hell.”  Ms. Darling had been filming pornography since she was 22 and took her job seriously. It was her responsibility to convince audiences to connect with her physically and emotionally. She tried everything, including acting out bondage fetishes, performing erotic electrostimulation (“electrosex”) on another woman and dressing as a real-estate agent. Yet no matter what she did to entice and engage, the results had always been voyeuristic, since there was always a screen separating her and her fans.  “You can pretend like you are in the bedroom with me, and it is someone you have a crush on,” she said. “You are in the experience.”    By 2025 pornography will be the third-largest VR sector, according to estimates prepared by Piper Jaffray, an investment and management firm. Only video games and N.F.L.-related content will be larger, it predicted, and the market will be worth $1 billion.

“We’re getting more and more of it every day,” said Mark Kernes, a senior editor at AVN Media Network, which covers the industry. “We are leading the technology in this area. Sex sells, and where there is money to be made, there will be entrepreneurs who want to adopt it and make money from it,” some by offering it for free to increase clicks.  Pornography is what rushed along the first printing press, and spurred developments in the internet, online payment systems and other technology. Now it’s time for virtual reality, Mr. Kernes said: “I’m pretty sure there is more porn VR out there than regular VR.”  Headsets Are Just the Beginning

Ms. Darling first experienced regular old VR at E3, a conference for the video-game industry. Excited by the pornography possibilities, she found a college student on Reddit who knew the technology but lacked a star. Before long, Ms. Darling started streaming weekly VR segments live from her bedroom in Los Angeles.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Wearable VR Gaming Devices To Increase Physical Activity

Wearable VR Gaming Devices To Increase Physical Activity | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
wearable tech, wearable, technology, virtual reality, augmented reality, gaming, devices, lifestyle
Richard Platt's insight:

Nowadays, virtual reality games allow us to immerse into the gaming world and control our alter-ego by moving our bodies in the real world. Early scientific research on virtual reality tells us that it provides motivational physical activity (Harris & Reid, 2005) and that it increases enjoyment while decreasing tiredness (Plante, Aldridge, Bogden, & Hanelin, 2003).  We had a look at what´s hot in the wearable gaming sector some time ago: A World Within Ours, Wearables Are Changing The Future Of Games, New Devices For Gaming – But let´s see what´s on the horizon and let´s get active while gaming.  The German based ICAROS GmbH is combining a virtual reality head mounted display with a fully new engineered device which gave their company its name: ICAROS . Players plank in the ICAROS and by moving and tilting their body (and consequently activating different muscles) they “fly” in the virtual reality. Applications range from racing a motorcycle, diving with a submarine or flying a jetpack-like device – all controlled by your bodies movement.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Do you smell that? Prolitec brings “ambient scenting” to the IoT market

Do you smell that? Prolitec brings “ambient scenting” to the IoT market | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
The company, which has had a lot of success in ambient scenting for the home, is expanding in the retail market.
Richard Platt's insight:

Prolitec is an ambient scenting company based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They have executive offices in Seattle and a worldwide sales presence on top of it all. Their new innovation is called ScenXus, and it aims to combine a highly sophisticated scenting technology with a smart IoT platform to monitor and control the performance quality of commercial scenting devices. The system is the big brother to the company’s Aera line of products, which integrates scenting into in much the same way as devices like Sonos, Nest and other IoT devices interact within a smart home.   While the new commercial technology is developing, where Prolitec’s bread is buttered is in the home market, where their Aera line of home scenting products is one of the most popular products in the Internet of Things (IoT) market. The pricing is different for each system, however, in that ScenXus clients pay a monthly subscription fee based on the complexity and individuality of their service, while Aera users simply purchase scenting cartridges based on their individual tastes.

Aera is a system meant to complement existing IoT technology like Google Home or Alexa, according to Prolitec CEO Richard Weening. The Aera devices are already controllable with smart devices like Alexaand will eventually be connectible with all home IoT devices.  “The story of ScenXus has to be the story of ambient scenting.”  “From a home point of view, you have control of the temperature with Nest said. “What it is at its most basic is the use of scent in commercial settings for some marketing-related reason. The reasons range from making a place smell better to associating a particular scent with a brand, selling a product, or any other situation where scent can add value to the customer experience.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Platt
Scoop.it!

Augmented reality and the rise of the digital object

Augmented reality and the rise of the digital object | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Apps let you choose from thousands of objects to insert into your digital photographs.
Richard Platt's insight:

With the release of iOS 11 this month, Apple gave an already barreling augmented reality (AR) trend a hard shove forward. Put simply, augmented reality is technology that allows the insertion or superimposition of “digital objects” or other information on real-time environments, either through the screen of a smartphone or the lenses of a headset.  Apple’s newly released operating system supports all kinds of AR applications, and the company is encouraging developers to get in on the action with its proprietary ARKit. And while the majority of apps currently available in this twilight before the release of iPhones 8 and X (both far more capable of bearing the processor burdens of AR) offer buggy “experiences” that feel more like momentary distractions, the technology is already working its way into our daily lives online.     Responsive facial filters were the first application of AR on Snapchat and (soon after, as usual) Instagram. (You can even broadcast live “in costume” on Instagram.) And in the past year, Snapchat has rolled out a rotating menu of digital objects (i.e. dancing hotdogs) that can be dragged into a scene, pinched to proper size, and staged however one pleases. (It’s your world, after all.)  And just this past week, Snapchat introduced AR sky filters that can lend your dull landscapes otherworldly atmospherics, and AR Bitmoji, personalized 3D avatars that users design, and that respond to the environments of your photos and videos (and tend to be cuter than you IRL).   As for Facebook, it hasn’t played its AR hand quite yet — though its AR Studio for developers has been up and running since April, and experimental uses for its Facebook Camera platform are well underway — including the first large-scale “piece” of augmented reality art.   --  And outside of social media, AR is quite literally finding its way into our homes. An app created by home design retailer Houzz allows users to test over 500,000 digital pieces of furniture and decor and position them around the house (as seen through your phone) at life-size scale in three dimensions. And IKEA has entered into the fray with IKEA Place, an app that lets you pick and place over 2,000 items wherever you like (even on a subway platform). Another app, Housecraft, bills itself as an “AR toybox for your home,” and that play on playfulness is on purpose – its fun to get creative and create a forest of ficuses in the kitchen, or a leaning tower of sofas in the driveway.   Elsewhere in this rapidly expanding dimension is GIPHY World, an AR extension of the beloved animated GIF service, which allows real-world realization of your favorite memes. There’s the three-dimensional ruler app MeasureKit, and Tape Measure (which can export information as CAD files). And there are new and revamped games galore, like an AR-enhanced Splitter Critters, which plops a virtual puzzle box on your coffee table.

more...
No comment yet.