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Rescooped by Richard Platt from Technology and Gadgets
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A 65-inch TV you can roll up like a poster and take with you

A 65-inch TV you can roll up like a poster and take with you | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
It's the world's first big-screen TV that can be rolled up to hide away when not in use.

Via Tiaan Jonker
Richard Platt's insight:

When you roll your future TV out of sight into a little box, thank LG Display.  (Well they had the competitive help of Samsung also going after this, and both of these companies use TRIZ to come up with these systems - too bad other companies aren't savvy in this way as they too could bring awesome new designs to the world).  The leader in big-screen OLED manufacturing, not satisfied to debut the first 88-inch 8K OLED TV, will show off another world's first at CES: a 65-inch 4K OLED display that's, get this, rollable. Although some concept big-screen TVs shown at past CES shows have been bendy, this is the first one that's flexible enough to spin up into tube form. LG's images depict it descending into a little box the size of a sound bar, but the company also talks about making the display portable. The secret, as usual, is its paper-thin organic light emitting diode display (OLED).

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FundamentalVR launches new tool that lets physicians, students see, feel virtual surgery

FundamentalVR launches new tool that lets physicians, students see, feel virtual surgery | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
For young surgeons, watching a procedure from from the sidelines and performing an operation with their own hands are two very different experiences. But one company is trying to remedy this experience gap with a new interactive virtual reality platform that lets surgeons and trainees virtually see and feel what it's like to perform specific operations. 

Via Florian Morandeau
Richard Platt's insight:

For young surgeons, watching a procedure from from the sidelines and performing an operation with their own hands are two very different experiences. But one company is trying to remedy this experience gap with a new interactive virtual reality platform that lets surgeons and trainees virtually see and feel what it's like to perform specific operations.   Yesterday London-based FundamentalVR launched its new software platform, Fundamental Surgery, that combines VR with haptic sensors. The platform gives users physical feedback simulating the feel of performing an operation.  “Our mission is to democratize surgical training by placing safe, affordable, and authentic simulations within arm’s reach of every surgeon in the world,” Richard Vincent, founder and CEO of FundamentalVR, said in a statement. “With the help of some of the top minds in medicine, as well some of the most advanced VR haptic programmers, we have created a solution that can be deployed anywhere — with limited investment — to allow surgeons to learn and hone their skills over and over again in a safe and controlled environment.”

Each time a surgeon or trainee uses the software they first log in to their personalized account. This allows the system to track, assess, and give feedback to the user on their performance, including their instrument use, procedural accuracy, and patient impact. Users and administrators are able to go in and look at the student or clinician’s progress and assessments, then pinpoint areas that need work.    Schools and hospitals using the software can run it on PCs or laptops, although it also requires a VR headset and two haptic arm devices. FundamentalVR’s SHIE software works with the haptic devices to give the user the sense of touch during the experience. The technology was designed so that users can get different physical feedback, such as what bone or skin feels like. The system can also switch up the surgeries so that the user must deal with possible “branch outcomes” like unexpected bleeding or a change in the patient’s condition.  According to the company, the technology currently has an orthopedic focus but the team plans on expanding that lens to include laparoscopic, general surgery, cardiovascular, and otolaryngology experiences.   In addition to the most recent launch, the company also offers mixed reality simulation, where the user wears a MultiMR HoloLens, which creates a holographic experience.   Virtual operating rooms have been trending in the sphere of physician training tools. Last year Osso VR announced that it landed $2 million in seed funding for its VR technology that also lets surgeons practice. Last month, the same company announced that it was adding a multiplayer feature to its surgical training app, which would let surgeons work together in a single VR space, citing that multiple players is a norm in the gaming world.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 23, 1:17 AM

A new interactive virtual reality platform for surgeons and trainees to virtually see and feel specific operations.

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Augmented Reality in Manufacturing

Augmented Reality in Manufacturing | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
“ Augmented technology solutions play an important role in simplifying the life of your workforce. AR adds value to the manufacturing industry. This article explains how AR using in manufacturing in detail.”
Via Immersivegaze, Emeric Nectoux
Richard Platt's insight:

Are you looking for flexible and cost-effective methods to manage the ever-growing demands of your manufacturing industry? Are you also looking for operational excellence and reduction in downtime? Your search ends here. The way forward is to “Discover the power of providing information where it is required”.

Until recently, it was difficult to imagine technology guiding real-world actions in industries. But the truth is, today’s manufacturing world increasingly relies on Augmented Reality (AR) Technology to provide information in every facet of its operations. AR provides the ability to attach media to scene objects. For instance, by using 3D augmented reality simulation, it is possible to experience design and possible scenarios before product realization. This goes a long way in defusing challenges and rework.

At Immersive gaze, we use AR to portray visual worlds with a high degree of realism that bridges the gap between training and operations. Starting from design and development right up to job assistance and training, our technology solutions play a key role in simplifying the life of your workforce. They add value to every step of your manufacturing process and the end result? Optimal performance where it matters most!

How our AR technology can be useful in an industrial setting?
Design & Development Augmented Reality Services can enrich each and every phase of industrial design.
  • The designer can easily explore and create mock-ups or prototypes to find the best ways to create a product.
  • Decision-making time is cut down as concepts and options can be reviewed, adjusted and modified quickly.
  • The result is rapid iterative design cycles with appropriate validation in the early phases of product development itself.
On-the-job-assistance
  • Imagine being able to pan a machine with a handheld device and view the potential problem zones highlighted.
  • Think of your employees being able to practice new measures in the safety of a simulated environment.
  • Virtual entities or tools can be positioned near real assembly lines to indicate how each item is to be assembled or disassembled.
  • Text or video clips can be used to convey additional instructions with reference to specific points or objects.

These are just some of the ways that the right guidance is made instantly available to every assembly operator and costly mistakes are eliminated.

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iFixit’s Magic Leap teardown features super precise engineering and tiny projectors

iFixit’s Magic Leap teardown features super precise engineering and tiny projectors | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
iFixit has published a teardown of the Magic Leap One Creator Edition, a $2,295 mixed reality headset that was released this August 2018.
Richard Platt's insight:

Augmented reality company Magic Leap released a “creator edition” of its ambitious, hugely hyped headset earlier this month. Today, iFixit published its teardown of the device, featuring a concrete look at technology that Magic Leap discusses in very abstract terms.  As we’ve previously discussed, the Magic Leap One Creator Edition uses a combination of waveguide lenses and tracking cameras to project hologram-like objects into your real environment. iFixit actually goes to the trouble (and it does have a lot of trouble with parts of this hard-to-repair device) of pulling out the multilayered waveguide and the little projector that shoots light through it. It also spells out the details of things like the controller’s magnetic tracking, which isn’t revelatory but also isn’t something Magic Leap spends a lot of time explaining.  The teardown reflects the basic impression we’ve had of Magic Leap: it’s an interesting device with some serious compromises. iFixit suggests that the magnetic sensor coil’s placement will make it less reliable for left-handed use. (I’ve used it in both left and right hands without noticing this, but I’ve only had a short demo.) Magic Leap’s headset is permanently wired to a wearable computer, and iFixit confirms that if you break that single cable, replacing it will take some work.  Unlike a lot of iFixit’s teardown subjects, the Magic Leap One isn’t a mass-market product; it’s aimed at developers and other people who are more interested in Magic Leap’s platform. But since it costs $2,295, laying out repair options is genuinely helpful — and for the rest of us, it’s a fun read.

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Microsoft's HoloLens mall demos bring early AR glasses to the masses

Microsoft's HoloLens mall demos bring early AR glasses to the masses | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Microsoft recently added HoloLens AR headset demos to its retail stores, letting mall shoppers go hands-on with a potentially transformative technology. Underscore potentially.
Richard Platt's insight:

Your phone or tablet might already have augmented reality capabilities, but the concept of AR doesn’t mean much to the average person right now: Apart from a couple of games and apps, AR is far from mainstream. Surprisingly, Microsoft is taking steps to change that, as it recently added HoloLens AR headset demos to its retail stores, letting mall shoppers go hands-on with a potentially transformative technology.  I say “potentially” because many companies — Microsoft, Google, and Apple among them — expect that augmented reality is going to be a big deal some day, but the hardware is currently stuck in a rut. As I explained last month, the key problem is that there’s no affordable, wearable hardware in the marketplace. HoloLens is wearable, but at $3,000 or more per headset, it’s not affordable. On the other hand, Apple and Google sell affordable AR devices, but none of them are wearable.  If you want to experience AR on a device you own today, Apple and Google expect you to hold up your phone or tablet, then look at the screen for a real-time augmented view through the camera. With Pokémon Go or a mapping app, you might see a virtual monster or location marker on the sidewalk in front of you. Open Snapchat, Apple’s Animoji, or Samsung’s AR Emoji and switch to the front-facing camera, then you’ll see a cartoony mask, animal, or face superimposed on top of yours.

Until recently, trying an AR headset like HoloLens required some serious cash or a visit to one of the relatively few retail locations with AR demo hardware. But now that Microsoft is facing a real competitor in Magic Leap, which says that it will soon demo its $2,295 One Creator Edition headset in select AT&T stores, the two-year-old HoloLens is suddenly coming out to play.

Rather than doing HoloLens demos inside the store, Microsoft employees set up a lightly fenced demo area right in the middle of my local mall’s walkway. They had at least two HoloLens units and multiple employees trained on using the device. There’s no sales pitch involved — it’s just an opportunity for visitors to see how the technology works.

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Magic Leap One Creator Edition preview: a flawed glimpse of mixed reality’s amazing potential

Magic Leap One Creator Edition preview: a flawed glimpse of mixed reality’s amazing potential | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
We tried the $2,295 Magic Leap One Creator Edition, the debut product from mixed reality startup Magic Leap — and found an ambitious vision facing serious technological challenges.
Richard Platt's insight:

When you write about augmented reality headsets, you’re supposed to start by describing something impossible — like a pastel dinosaur stomping its feet in a quiet office space in Florida. This dinosaur is made of fist-sized blocks that look like candy, and the office belongs to Magic Leap, a mysterious startup that’s been working in near-total secrecy for seven years. I should clarify that the dinosaur also isn’t real. It exists only in the lenses of the Magic Leap One, a pair of goggles that Magic Leap hopes will replace phones, computers, and every other high-tech screen in our lives.

The whimsical anecdote setup is supposed to emphasize how well the Magic Leap One tricked my mind into believing this impossible thing existed, which is what I’d hoped would happen last month when Magic Leap invited me to its headquarters. But it just didn’t happen.  In reality, the dinosaur I see through the Magic Leap One looks genuinely three-dimensional, but pieces start getting cut off when I approach it. When a man walks behind it, I can see him slightly. My headset doesn’t account for relative distance, so it’s impossible for someone to walk in front of the dinosaur, no matter how close they are. It’s still a fascinating, wonderful illusion — maybe the best I’ve seen in one of these headsets, and far cooler than watching an AR model through an iPhone screen. But it’s not the kind of revolutionary (or downright magical) advance that Magic Leap has teased for years. It’s a better version of a thing I’ve tried before, and that thing is still very much a work in progress.  Based on an afternoon with Magic Leap, the Magic Leap One Creator Edition — which ships in the US today for $2,295 — is a functional, thoughtfully designed headset with some very real advantages over competitors like the Microsoft HoloLens. But it doesn’t seem like a satisfying computing device or a radical step forward for mixed reality. Magic Leap’s vision is a compelling alternative to that of Silicon Valley’s tech giants. But there’s a baffling disconnect between its vast resources and parts of its actual product. I genuinely believe Magic Leap has given me a glimpse of the future of computing, but it might take a long time to reach that future, and I’m not sure Magic Leap will be the company that gets there first.

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Vizio SB362An-F6 review: A $100 sound bar shouldn't sound this good

Vizio SB362An-F6 review: A $100 sound bar shouldn't sound this good | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
The Vizio SB362An-F6 offers astoundingly good value for money, with excellent sound quality for a budget sound bar.
Richard Platt's insight:

The Good The Vizio SB362An-F6 offers very good sound for a bargain price. The inclusion of Dolby, DTS and Virtual:X sound modes delivers a high level of soundtrack compatibility.

The Bad Paying more for the Vizio SB3621 with an external subwoofer will bring enhanced performance. The LED display is a little hard to grok.

The Bottom Line The Vizio SB362An-F6 offers astoundingly good value, with excellent sound quality and a high degree of flexibility for a budget sound bar.

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The 10 Best VR Apps for Classrooms Using Merge VR’s New Merge Cube

The 10 Best VR Apps for Classrooms Using Merge VR’s New Merge Cube | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Recently, the world of virtual reality was shaken up when the popular Merge Cube by Merge VR dropped in price from $15 to just a dollar at many Walmar

Via Timo Ilomäki
Richard Platt's insight:

Recently, the world of virtual reality was shaken up when the popular Merge Cube by Merge VR dropped in price from $15 to just a dollar at many Walmart stores. When using specific apps, these cubes showcase different experiences as you rotate the block around with your hands. If you haven’t held a Merge Cube yet, they're made of a soft rubber material that’s comparable to a stiffer stress ball. (If you want to test out the apps first, you can print out a temporary paper cube.)  The Merge Cubes work with most mobile phones and tablets, and the apps are found in the Google Play and App Store. There’s also an optional VR headset users can wear for hands-free play, which makes the experience more immersive. The most exciting aspect of the Merge Cube is the opportunity for students to become a Merge Cube Developer and create their own applications.  While educators are flocking to scoop up hot deals at their local store, many are now wondering how to use them in the classroom. I’ve listed some of my favorite educational apps to load on your devices, but I anticipate the list will continue to expand as more developers jump into the Merge Cube Madness.

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Rescooped by Richard Platt from Technology in Business Today
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Microsoft's latest data center houses 864 servers underwater

Microsoft's latest data center houses 864 servers underwater | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
As a major player in the cloud infrastructure market, Microsoft is keen on figuring out better ways to store and power its machinery. To that end, it's now deployed a data center on the seafloor off the Orkney Islands in Scotland.

Via TechinBiz
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Jesse Golembiesky's curator insight, June 7, 12:41 PM
This is really cool! Microsoft has servers underneath the ocean!
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How will Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Enterprise Impact Humans?

How will Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Enterprise Impact Humans? | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
How will Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Enterprise Impact Humans?

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

How will Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the Enterprise Impact Humans

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Alex Mak's curator insight, June 8, 11:58 PM
Artificial Intelligence
lemonlawlawyers's comment, June 9, 4:43 AM
good
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Apple's In-Depth Work on a Next-Gen Mixed Reality Headset is Simply Mind Boggling in Scope

Apple's In-Depth Work on a Next-Gen Mixed Reality Headset is Simply Mind Boggling in Scope | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Buried in a plethora of patent applications published by the U.S. Patent Office today was a patent filing with a completely new vision for Apple's future headset. It's mind boggling in scope and even provides us with a vision 10 years out of a desktop replacement using a head mound display system that's wild

Via Sara Mautino
Richard Platt's insight:

Buried in a plethora of patent applications published by the U.S. Patent Office today was a patent filing with a completely new vision for Apple's future headset. It's mind boggling in scope and even provides us with a vision 10 years out of a desktop replacement using a head mound display system that's wild

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Why do people keep giving Magic Leap (an AR startup) money?

Why do people keep giving Magic Leap (an AR startup) money? | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Magic Leap, an augmented reality company that has never shipped or even shown a product, has just gotten a $502 million investment on top of its nearly $1.4 billion in existing funding. Th

Via Sara Mautino
Richard Platt's insight:

Magic Leap, an augmented reality company that has never shipped or even shown a product, has just gotten a $502 million investment on top of its nearly $1.4 billion in existing funding. The round is led by Singapore holding company Temasek, and includes major existing investors like Google, Alibaba, and J.P. Morgan Investment Management. It adds to the mystique around the secretive company, which has been on the verge of unveiling a pair of compact augmented reality glasses since at least 2015. Two years later, its main output is still flowery paeans to its own greatness.  Investors have proven more than willing to throw money at overblown tech startups, like Theranos and Juicero. But Magic Leap still seems like a potentially viable company — just one that I doubt will deliver exactly what it’s promised.

Magic Leap ignores all the legitimately tricky parts of building augmented reality glasses Magic Leap’s prototype hardware is supposed to produce incredibly realistic virtual objects. Its reputation is nearly mythical — someone, secondhand and possibly apocryphally, once told me it stands people in a demo room and challenges them to identify what’s real. The company is also building a powerhouse media division, staffed with creative talent like author Neal Stephenson and game developer Graeme Devine, and is partnered with major digital effects studios Weta Workshop and ILMxLAB.
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Toshiba partners with Atheer: AiR™ Enterprise solutions  to integrate dynaEdge smart-glasses

Toshiba partners with Atheer: AiR™ Enterprise solutions  to integrate dynaEdge  smart-glasses | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., March 15, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Atheer Inc., a leader in industrial enterprise AR solutions, today announces a strategic partnership with Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc. for the Atheer AiR™ Enterprise AR solution and the dynaEdge™ AR Smart Glasses.


Via Sara Mautino
Richard Platt's insight:

Using AiR Enterprise, the new Toshiba dynaEdge AR Smart Glasses offer an ideal solution for industrial applications such as field service, dealer service, manufacturing and repair operations, assembly line management, technician and expert training, warehouse picking, asset inspection and repair as well as remote visualization and support

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Sara Mautino's curator insight, March 16, 12:38 AM
"Using AiR Enterprise, the new Toshiba dynaEdge AR Smart Glasses offer an ideal solution for industrial applications such as field service, dealer service, manufacturing and repair operations, assembly line management, technician and expert training, warehouse picking, asset inspection and repair as well as remote visualization and support"
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Apple Is Clearly Working on AR Glasses

Apple Is Clearly Working on AR Glasses | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Apple buying a startup manufacturer of lenses for augmented reality glasses is one of many clear signs that Cupertino is building AR glasses.
Richard Platt's insight:

Apple has bought Akonia Holographics, a Colorado-based startup dedicated to the manufacturing of displays for augmented reality glasses.   In addition to other recent purchases, this is an extremely strong indicator that the Cupertino company is actively working on AR glasses.idropnews/Martin HajekAccording to Akonia’s web site, its more than 200 patents result in a technology that can create “thin, transparent smart glass lenses that display vibrant, full-color, wide field-of-view images.” Just the kind of qualities that would be touted by Phil Schiller at a special AR glasses event.  Akonia is only the latest in a long series of purchases that show that Apple is actively working on developing AR glasses. Apple has been buying a lot of companies with technologies that are directly applicable in an AR set since as eagerly as 2013.  Just in 2017, Cook and his mariachis bought four: InVisage Technologies (an American quantum dot-based image sensor manufacturer), Regain (a French computer vision company), Vrvana (a Canadian manufacturer of augmented reality head-mounted displays), and SensoMotoric Instruments (which makes eye tracking hardware and software).  In 2015 Apple acquired Metaio, a German company that developed an Augmented Reality SDK that seems to be the basis for ARKit, the Apple Augmented Reality developer API that debuted in iOS 11 in 2017.  And let’s not forget about PrimeSense, which Apple scooped up in 2013. PrimeSense developed the software for the Kinect 3D depth sensor. The technology, which already has ended in Face ID, will be crucial for an AR device. Equipped with small IR cameras, Apple’s glasses will be able to track the motion of your hands in order for you to interact with a virtual object — like Leap Motion is doing with its Project Orion.

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Impact of AR/VR/MR in Automotive industry

Impact of AR/VR/MR in Automotive industry | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it

A new technology to make your workshop more efficient. We may not have flying cars yet, but the vehicle buying and manufacturing process is becoming the stuff of science fiction. With a camera-based smartphone app that uses 3D animations, augmented reality and video to teach owners about their cars.


Via Immersivegaze, Emeric Nectoux
Richard Platt's insight:

A new technology to make your workshop more efficient. We may not have flying cars yet, but the vehicle buying and manufacturing process is becoming the stuff of science fiction. With a camera-based smartphone app that uses 3D animations, augmented reality and video to teach owners about their cars.

Road safety through Augmented Driving

The impressive technology of Augmented Driving with advanced real-time object detection covers really awesome features to support your driving.

  • It reduces the dangers of driving by enhancing the driver’s view of what lies ahead of them, particularly in situations where there is dense fog, heavy rain or low lighting.
  • It displays information like
    1. Lane detection and lane departure warning
    2. Vehicle detection and safety distance monitoring
      Speeding etc.

 Augmented Reality for Instructions and Service Maintenance

Not familiar with the interior of the car?

  • AR apps allow owners to use their phones to get more familiar with their cars and learn how to perform basic maintenance.
  • If the device is pointed at the knob or device or any lever that can be seen, the app displays the details and the instructions of “How to use” of the said item of interest.
  • The app can also show an illustrated, step-by-step walkthrough of the related maintenance item.
  • Can help technicians get a first-hand idea about the car’s conditions for cases where roadside assistance is required.
Augmented Reality Windshields -the next frontier in digital advertising
  • Automakers and tech companies sense new revenue opportunities in putting ads, services in front of drivers.
  • Using a vehicle’s windshield to overlay content may be the next way to pitch more products and services to consumers.
  • These ads could feature nearby restaurants, gas stations, shops, attractions, and other businesses near your location.
  • Promoters feel a windshield display is a safer alternative than drivers taking their eyes off the road to glance down and check a smartphone.
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Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, August 27, 10:51 AM

Non-exhaustive list of augmented reality use-cases in the automotive industry. 

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Augmented/ Virtual/ Mixed Reality in Aerospace

Augmented/ Virtual/ Mixed Reality in Aerospace | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
“ Here the detailed explanation of how Augmented/ Virtual/ Mixed Reality technologies can be used in Aerospace industry.”
Via Immersivegaze, Emeric Nectoux
Richard Platt's insight:

Augmented Reality (AR) has the potential to transform aviation/aerospace industry by creating new mixed reality worlds that serve as a medium for gaining work-related skills.  Augmented Reality for Aircraft Maintenance

  • Aviation maintenance facilities for general, commercial, and governmental organizations operate, inspect, and maintain complex aircraft structures and systems with many highly interrelated components.
  • An AR system has the potential to enable job task training and job task guidance for the novice technician in a real-world environment.
  • An AR system could reduce the cost for training and retraining of AMTs by complementing human information processing and assisting with performance of job tasks.
  • An AR system could eliminate the need to leave the aircraft for the retrieval of information from maintenance manuals for inspection and repair procedures.

  Virtual Reality for Airport Security and Safety Training

  • Traditional collaborative training is both resource intensive and time-consuming.
  • With a busy airport, it’s not feasible to practice where the actual disaster response would take place.
  • In using a virtual facsimile of any Airport, trainees can practice their emergency procedures on a real facility.
  • The logistical and response challenges present in the real environment translates to the virtual giving trainees a chance to perform as they would in real life.
Augmented Reality for Aircraft Windshields  Augmented Reality services enhance the pilots’ ability to visualize terrain, navigation, traffic, weather, and airspace along with convenience and safety items like an emergency, preflight, in-flight, and landing checklists (without the need for pilots to take their eyes off the sky, and access multiple screens and devices).
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Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, August 27, 10:58 AM

How AR/VR/MR can transform the Aerospace Industry. 

A non exhaustive list of AR / VR and MR uses-cases applied to aerospace industry.

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Hyundai Kona Electric gets official EPA range of 258 miles and efficiency of 120 MPG 

Hyundai Kona Electric gets official EPA range of 258 miles and efficiency of 120 MPG  | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Hyundai has done it again as it delivers an undoubtedly hyper-efficient all-electric vehicle. The Kona Electric gets an official EPA range of 258 miles and efficiency of 120 MPGe.
Richard Platt's insight:

Hyundai has done it again as it delivers an undoubtedly hyper-efficient all-electric vehicle.  The Kona Electric gets an official EPA range of 258 miles and efficiency of 120 MPGe.  The Hyundai Ioniq Electric is still the efficiency king, but its new all-electric vehicle, the Kona Electric, still delivers an impressive efficiency even though it is a “compact SUV” format with a much bigger battery pack.  When the Korean automaker unveiled the Kona Electric earlier this year, it claimed a range of “up to 292 miles” for the version with the bigger battery pack. But that was based on the European standard and we estimated the EPA and real-world range to be closer to 250 miles.  Now the official numbers are in and the vehicle has an impressive 258 miles of range on a single charge, according to the EPA.  It also achieved an impressive efficiency of 120 MPGe (132 for city driving and 108 for highway driving), which is just enough to beat the efficiency of the Chevy Bolt EV, which is likely the Kona Electric’s closest competitor:

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Magic Leap One first look: worth the hype?

Richard Platt's insight:

Google-backed startup Magic Leap invited The Verge to Florida for a hands-on of the Magic Leap One, a headset that projects 3D images into reality. The goggles are weird, futuristic, and surprisingly wearable — but has Magic Leap’s technology caught up to its ambitions?

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Lenovo Smart Display Review - Touchscreen Smart Home Assistant

Richard Platt's insight:

Lisa Gade reviews the first Google Assistant smart speaker / home assistant with a display, the Lenovo Smart Display. It’s available in two sizes: 8” for $199 and 10” for $249. Both have IPS touch screens, an ample speaker and WiFi 802.11ac. It does all the things Google Home does and it adds visuals- so you can see your schedule, remote camera feed, YouTube videos, step-by-step recipes and more on screen. It competes with the Amazon Alexa Show.

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VR, AR, AI, LBVR Summer Sizzles

VR, AR, AI, LBVR Summer Sizzles | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Pay no attention to the dead robot in the doorway.
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Jurassic World LBVR at Dave & Busters

Dave & Busters launched Jurassic World VR motion platform experience at all 111 Dave & Buster’s domestic locations. I spent an hour in Dave & Buster’s in Times Square last Wednesday and went through the simulation twice. It’s terrific. Best 5 minutes of VR $5 will ever buy you. D&B is not terribly crowded, as you would expect, at 9pm on a weeknight, but there was a crowd of thirty people waiting to board the bonafide theme park quality ride in the midst of the massive arcade. People loved it. Grandmothers and six-year-olds. Loved. It. Screaming their heads off and very, very present in Jurassic World. And they didn’t shoot anything but pictures.   Kudos to Dave & Buster’s for cooking the whole deal up with Universal Studios, The Virtual Reality Company, which did the content, and motion platform integration, and to VRStudios which provided the VRcade Attraction Management Platform.  I spent some time wandering around D&B and playing games after experiencing Jurrasic World, courtesy of a very generous D&B manager. None of these amusements compared to the experience just had. The VRCompany informs me they have already had 0ver 600 thousand patrons. Doing some quick math, that's a gross of three million dollars and counting. No wonder people are excited about Location Based VR.  Meet Looking Glass - AR on Your Desktop Without Glasses.  I had a chance to meet with Looking Glass Factory co-founder and CEO Shawn Frayne who gave me a demo of Looking Glass’ Holographic desktop Display for volumetric content. The device, targeting 3D content creators, is available for pre-order in limited quantities on Kickstarter until August 24th. I usually don’t write about Kickstarter campaigns, having been burned more than once, but in this case, I tried the product and recommend it without hesitation. It’s compatible with 3D creation programs like Maya, Unity, and Blender.

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Secret Amazon research unit developing health tech with Fred Hutch: report

Secret Amazon research unit developing health tech with Fred Hutch: report | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it

More details have become public regarding Amazon’s secret “skunk works” division, which is focused on innovative pursuits that could expand the company’s reach in healthcare technology, cancer research and medical records.

According to reports from CNBC, the company’s Grand Challenge research group has been working with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center to develop machine learning tools for oncology. A Fred Hutch spokesperson told CNBC that it has several early-stage projects underway with its Seattle-area tech neighbors, including Amazon, as well as Microsoft and Tableau Software, and hopes to preview them later this year.

The team, which also works under the code names 1492 or Amazon X, now totals about 50 employees following its launch in 2014. It includes ex-FDA officials, the founders of several health startups, and the founder of Google’s robotic surgery programs, Babak Parviz, who also invented Google Glass. 

One project, which Grand Challenge has been developing internally for the past three years, aims to translate and double-check unstructured data from electronic health records for possibly incorrect diagnoses or missed information. Amazon has started to shop the program, Hera, around to health insurance companies.


Via Dominique Godefroy, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Tesla might have achieved battery energy density and cost breakthroughs

Tesla might have achieved battery energy density and cost breakthroughs | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
There was a lot of news that came out of Tesla shareholder meeting this week, but there was one important statement that sort of went under the radar. Elon Musk is generally careful not to use the …
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The CEO thinks that the company is on pace to achieve a battery cell cost of $100 per kWh by the end of the year depending on commodity prices remaining stable in the next few months.

While we are only talking about battery cell costs and not the cost of the whole battery pack, it would still be an impressive price point.  In comparison, GM is currently buying battery cells from LG Chem for the Chevy Bolt EV at $145 per kWh and Audi says that it is buying batteries at $114 per kWh for its upcoming e-tron quattro that has yet to launchAs for the cost at the pack level, Musk sees Tesla achieving that important price point of $100 per kWh for the overall battery pack in less than two years.

Musk also added that he sees Tesla achieving a 30% improvement in volumetric energy density within 2 to 3 years using current proven technology that “needs to be scaled and made reliable.”  Such an improvement in volumetric energy density would mean that Tesla could, for example, fit 130 kWh of energy capacity in its current Model S and Model X 100 kWh battery packs and push the range of those vehicles over 400 miles on a single charge.

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Apple's Mixed Reality Headset Part 2: A 3D Document Editing and Viewing System

Apple's Mixed Reality Headset Part 2: A 3D Document Editing and Viewing System | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it

"[...] one of the coolest patent filings Apple has made in some time [...]"


Via Sara Mautino
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Patently Apple posted a report titled "Apple's In-Depth Work on a Next-Gen Mixed Reality Headset is Simply Mind Boggling in Scope." It was one of the coolest patent filings Apple has made in some time. At the end of our report I presented a single patent figure from a second related patent that was published yesterday to demonstrate where Apple could take their next generation mixed reality headset. That patent figure is now presented in this follow-up report. The figure was taken from Apple's patent filing titled "3D Document Editing System."

 

In-part and in reality, Apple's mixed reality headset could double as a portable desktop and/or desktop replacement. For professionals on the road, using a mixed reality headset as their 30" display to work on large documents or architectural drawings or an ad campaign is vastly superior to a notebook to be sure.

 

Apple notes in their filing that conventional graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for text generation and editing systems work in a two-dimensional (2D) space (e.g., a 2D screen or page on a screen). Highlighting areas or portions of text using these GUIs typically involves adding some effect in 2D such as bold or italics text, underlining, or coloring.

 

Virtual reality (VR) allows users to experience and/or interact with an immersive artificial three-dimensional (3D) environment. For example, VR systems may display stereoscopic scenes to users in order to create an illusion of depth, and a computer may adjust the scene content in real-time to provide the illusion of the user interacting within the scene.

 

Similarly, augmented reality (AR) and mixed reality (MR) combine computer generated information with views of the real world to augment, or add content to, a user's view of their environment. The simulated environments of VR and/or the enhanced content of AR/MR may thus be utilized to provide an interactive user experience for multiple applications, such as interacting with virtual training environments, gaming, remotely controlling drones or other mechanical systems, viewing digital media content, interacting with the internet, or the like.

 

Conventional VR, AR, and MR systems may allow content consumers to view and interact with content in a 3D environment. Conventional VR systems may provide tools and applications that allow VR content creators to create and edit 3D objects, and may provide a text generation and editing system with a conventional 2D GUI that allows content creators to generate text content that can be attached to 3D objects.

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Intel wants smart glasses to be a thing

Intel wants smart glasses to be a thing | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it

The glasses are called Vaunt, and they are nearly indistinguishable from regular glasses. Instead of some cumbersome headset with a special screen, Intel’s Vaunt glasses are simple plastic frames that weigh under 50 grams . They work with prescription and non-prescription lenses.


Via Sara Mautino
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The glasses are called Vaunt, and they are nearly indistinguishable from regular glasses. Instead of some cumbersome headset with a special screen, Intel’s Vaunt glasses are simple plastic frames that weigh under 50 grams . They work with prescription and non-prescription lenses

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The Race for AR Glasses Starts Now

The Race for AR Glasses Starts Now | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
The big players in tech, from Google to Amazon, and some little players, too, are jockeying to own augmented reality.

Via Remi El-Ouazzane, Sara Mautino
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The big players in tech, from Google to Amazon, and some little players, too, are jockeying to own augmented reality.

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As Uber and Tesla struggle with driverless cars, Waymo moves forward

As Uber and Tesla struggle with driverless cars, Waymo moves forward | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
When it comes to self-driving cars, there's Waymo and then there's everyone else.
Richard Platt's insight:

Waymo announced on Thursday that it was ordering 62,000 Pacifica minivans from Fiat Chrysler. It's the latest sign that Alphabet's self-driving car company is operating on a different level from the rest of the industry.  The last few months have had a lot of bad news for fans of self-driving cars. Last December, after news that Volvo and Ford might not achieve ambitious early goals, Wired wrote that self-driving cars were entering a "trough of disillusionment." Events over the last six months have only deepened that trough.  In March, an Uber self-driving car struck and killed pedestrian Elaine Herzberg in Tempe, Arizona, forcing Uber to suspend its testing program indefinitely. In May, the National Transportation Safety Board released a preliminary report finding big problems with Uber's softwareThe same month, a Tesla customer died in a crash in Mountain View, California, while Tesla's driver-assistance program, Autopilot, was engaged. Tesla is working to upgrade Autopilot to a fully self-driving system, but the leader of that effort, Jim Keller, left the team in April. He was the third Autopilot boss to leave Tesla in the last 18 months.  These and other negative headlines have contributed to a darkening public mood on self-driving cars. A poll released in May found that the proportion of Americans who would be afraid to ride in a self-driving car had risen from 63 percent in late 2017 to 73 percent.  But if the self-driving industry is in crisis, nobody told Waymo. Over the last 18 months, the company has been methodically laying groundwork to launch a commercial driverless car service.  Uber, Nvidia, and Toyota all suspended self-driving car testing in the wake of the March Uber crash—but not Waymo. Waymo continued logging miles in Arizona and elsewhere. And days after the crash, the company announced a deal with Jaguar Land Rover to build 20,000 fully self-driving I-PACE cars.  Then on Thursday, Waymo announced a massive deal for 62,000 Chrysler Pacifica minivans—by far the biggest deal for self-driving vehicles so far. Waymo wouldn't be making deals this big unless the company was very confident that its technology was on track for commercial use within the next year or two.  When people use stories about Tesla, Uber, or Ford to argue that self-driving cars are still many years away, they ignore the fact that Google—now Waymo—has been working on this problem way longer than anyone else. In October 2015, Google was already confident enough in its technology to let a blind man take an unaccompanied test drive on Austin streets. Almost three years later, it's not clear if anyone else has managed to build technology as sophisticated as Waymo had three years ago.   So it might be true that the rest of the industry is failing to live up to early self-driving car hype. But Waymo is in a class by itself.

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