The Architecture of the City
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The Architecture of the City
a closer look at urbanism and architecture
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Tower House: Architecture that Camouflages into the Tree Canopy

Tower House: Architecture that Camouflages into the Tree Canopy | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

This small vacation house is designed as a stairway to the treetops.


Keeping the footprint to a minimum so as not to disturb the wooded site, each of the three floors has only one small bedroom and bath, each a tiny private suite. The fourth floor, which contains the living spaces, spreads out from the tower like the surrounding forest canopy, providing views of the lake and mountains in the distance, virtually the entire Catskill Mountain range. The glass-enclosed stair highlights the procession from forest floor to treetop aerie, while the dark green enameled exterior camouflages the house by reflecting the surrounding woods, and dematerializing its form...


Via Lauren Moss
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ignaciano13's comment, April 19, 2013 2:30 PM
Ok Muy bonito. ¡Precioso!
Geovanni's curator insight, April 30, 2013 10:01 AM

What an interesting house to take a vacation at. :)

Clem Stanyon's comment, May 14, 2013 8:46 PM
Nice concept, I'm not sure that geometrical shapes are goign to 'blend' with fractal ones, though.
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Climate-responsive architecture: Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Climate-responsive architecture: Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Villa 921 is a single-story concrete house designed to protect residents from extreme climate conditions. Located in Japan, at a remote island accessible only by boat, this unique home was designed by Harunatsu-Archi. 

Architecturally, wood and glass walls slide open across the front and rear of the building, allowing the wind to move through the spaces for natural ventilation, while projecting canopies shade the rooms and terrace from the harsh sun. During typhoons, the house and terrace can be screened behind protective coverings, which fasten onto the protruding eaves...

 

More from the architects:

“The usable area of the house only amounts to about 70 square metres,” said architects Shoko Murakaji and Naoto Murakaji. “This is by no means large, but thanks to the amazing views of the landscape, there is never a feeling of narrowness.”


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Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture

Rammed Earth House by Feldman Architecture | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Located in rolling hillsides of Carmel, California, the Caterpillar House is a 2-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom dwelling that implements sustainable features and strategies for minimal development impact.

 

Feldman Architecture gave the client a home that connects seamlessly with the outdoors, in the form of a modern ranch with strong horizontal lines.

The house is quite literally made from the ground it sits on, with repurposed dirt from the site being used in the building of the walls. The “rammed earth walls” help keep the temperature steady because they act as a thermal mass. The house also utilizes natural ventilation to keep it cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

The roof integrates photovoltaic panels that produce all the required energy, and have been carefully integrated into the design...

 

View more imagery of the first LEED Platinum Custom Home on the California Central Coast and read the project description at Feldman Architecture.


Via Lauren Moss, Proyecto Espacios
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A Dream Beach House for the Eco-Minded...

A Dream Beach House for the Eco-Minded... | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
It’s a testament to the ebbing tide of starchitecture that some of the most admired new buildings of recent memory are the ones you hardly notice at all.

The design brief called for a very low-impact, easy to maintain summer home that provides necessary programmatic functions with minimum distractions from the land and the view. The design response situates the structure among mature fir trees located directly between the beach and an upland meadow, with walls of glass opening out to both. Steel columns minimize visible structure from the interior, while metal-clad wall elements provide a bold form when seen from the exterior. The roof is vegetated, which filters rainwater that in turn is collected and stored for use in irrigation. Potable hot water and hydronic heating are aided by solar collectors on the roof, and PV panel s above the vegetable garden provide supplemental electricity. The home is intended for occupancy from May through October, and systems have been designed to zero out electricity use over the course of a full year.


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