Urban Life
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Urban Life
what to do to improve our lives in the city where we live
Curated by Jandira Feijó
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Why Bitcoin Is Poised To Change Society Much More Than The Internet Did

Why Bitcoin Is Poised To Change Society Much More Than The Internet Did | Urban Life | Scoop.it

There is a bitcoin craze at the moment, with prices of bitcoin skyrocketing. Bitcoin is still far from ready for prime time, but as it matures, it will change society’s fundamental operations much more than the Internet did. The net, after all, only allowed people to talk and shop more efficiently. By comparison, bitcoin eradicates the government’s ability to operate.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Juanjo Pina's curator insight, April 4, 2013 1:19 AM

Bueno, comparar una criptomoneda cuyo hábitat es Internet con la misma Internet es como decir que la silla de montar caballos fue más revolucionaria que los caballos. Pero está majo.

Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
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polis: Startups, Cycles and Cities

polis: Startups, Cycles and Cities | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Urban imagination in the Americas revolves around two paradigms: the growing city and the declining city. The growing city symbolizes the dream of expansion — full of bustle, construction and recent arrivals eager to succeed. The declining city is the disappointed dream, with vacant buildings, rusting industrial kingdoms and, in Detroit, an endless grid of empty streets.

Statistically, growing and declining cities fall into well-defined patterns. Growing cities have rising populations, rising rents and falling unemployment, while declining cities have the opposite. One other statistic stands out, harder to measure but probably more important: the number of new businesses. The list of cities with exciting entrepreneurship scenes fits neatly into the paradigm of the growing city....


Via Lauren Moss
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What Makes Some Cities Greener Than Others

What Makes Some Cities Greener Than Others | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Today I turn my attention to the economic, demographic, and other factors associated with cities and metros that have lower levels of carbon emissions.

 

Several Martin Prosperity Institute colleagues and I [Richard Florida] took a simple, straightforward statistical look at several things research and common sense suggest should be associated with higher and lower levels of carbon emissions.

We measure emissions three ways, as a function of population (per capita), workforce (per worker), and economic output (per economic output). All the caveats regarding correlation not being causation apply. However, our findings underscore the fact that carbon emissions are linked as much to the way we live as how we produce and manufacture things...


Via Flora Moon, Lauren Moss
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Opportunity is Local (or: You Can’t Buy a New Economy)

Opportunity is Local (or: You Can’t Buy a New Economy) | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Truly great places are not built from scratch to attract people from elsewhere; the best places have evolved into dynamic, multi-use destinations over time: years, decades, centuries. These places are reflective of the communities that surround them, not the other way around. Placemaking is, ultimately, more about the identification and development of local talent, not the attraction of talent from afar.

 

Places aren’t about the 21st century economy. They are about the people who inhabit and develop them. They are the physical manifestations of the social networks upon which our global economy is built. Likewise, Place-making is not about making existing places palatable to a certain class of people. It is a process by which each community can develop place capital by bringing people together to figure out what competitive edge their community might have and improve local economic prospects in-place.


Via Lauren Moss
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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:20 AM

Trend: Opportunity is Local

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

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Editorial> Getting It Right in the Queen City

Editorial> Getting It Right in the Queen City | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Alan G. Brake praises progressive urbanism in Cincinnati.

America has a deep-seated anti-urban streak, which happens to dovetail, in the eyes of many, with a mistrust of government at every level. The Republican presidential primary has flared with anti-urban rhetoric, which is particularly shortsighted given the still-weak state of the economy, one in which urban areas are bouncing back faster than their rural and exurban counterparts. That cities are the country’s economic engine seems obvious almost to the point of being self-evident, so why is it still seen as politically advantageous to denigrate urban areas? And why are urbanists so bad at making the case for cities with the public?


Via Lauren Moss
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NYTimes: The Death of the Fringe Suburb

NYTimes: The Death of the Fringe Suburb | Urban Life | Scoop.it
As demand for housing in walkable neighborhoods rises, we should be investing in carless transit options.

 

An excellent article that ties the economic mortgage crisis with the urban geography of the United States.  This is a good piece to challenge students to think about how the organzation of cities matter. 

 

The cities and inner-ring suburbs that will be the foundation of the recovery require significant investment at a time of government retrenchment. Bus and light-rail systems, bike lanes and pedestrian improvements — what traffic engineers dismissively call “alternative transportation” — are vital. We have to stop throwing good money after bad. It is time to instead build what the market wants: mixed-income, walkable cities and suburbs that will support the knowledge economy, promote environmental sustainability and create jobs...


Via Seth Dixon, Lauren Moss
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