Upton Sinclair meatpacking industry
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New Rules Proposed for Meatpacking Industry - NYTimes.com

New Rules Proposed for Meatpacking Industry - NYTimes.com | Upton Sinclair meatpacking industry | Scoop.it

The Obama administration proposed new rules on Friday seeking to increase competition and rein in potentially unfair practices by large meatpackers and poultry processors. The move is aimed at helping small livestock and poultry farmers survive in an industry dominated by corporate giants.

The rules could give farmers and ranchers new leverage in suing meat companies that they believe have treated them unfairly. They would end practices among cattle and hog buyers that may lower prices paid to farmers and feedlot owners. And they would set new protections for poultry farmers, who often must go deeply into debt to build the chicken houses needed to win contracts from processors.

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Meatpacking in America: Still a Jungle Out There? . NOW | PBS (Current Document)

Meatpacking in America: Still a Jungle Out There? . NOW | PBS (Current Document) | Upton Sinclair meatpacking industry | Scoop.it

Some critics say today's meat packing industry in America is little better than the one described by Upton Sinclair in The Jungle a century ago.Responding to the concerns of labor and public advocates, former Nebraska Governor Michael Johanns (currently U.S. Secretary of Agriculture) issued the "Nebraska Meatpacking Industry Workers Bill of Rights" in June of 2000. Though only a voluntary set of guidelines, the bill recognized the rights of meat packing employees to organize, work in safe conditions, and to seek help from the state.

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Primary Sources

And then there was the condemned meat industry, with its endless horrors. The people of Chicago saw the government inspectors in Packingtown, and they all took that to mean that they were protected from diseased meat; they did not understand that these hundred and sixty-three inspectors had been appointed at the request of the packers, and that they were paid by the United States government to certify that all the diseased meat was kept in the state. They had no authority beyond that; for the inspection of meat to be sold in the city and state the whole force in Packingtown consisted of three henchmen of the local political machine

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BRIA 24 1 b Upton Sinclairs The Jungle: Muckraking the Meat-Packing Industry - Constitutional Rights Foundation

BRIA 24 1 b Upton Sinclairs The Jungle: Muckraking the Meat-Packing Industry - Constitutional Rights Foundation | Upton Sinclair meatpacking industry | Scoop.it
CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS FOUNDATION Bill of Rights in Action FALL 2008 (Volume 24, No.
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Dangers, tensions lurk in meatpacking industry

Dangers, tensions lurk in meatpacking industry | Upton Sinclair meatpacking industry | Scoop.it

He works in a world of long knives and huge saws, blood and bone, arctic chill and sweltering heat. For Martin Cortez, this is life on the line as a meatpacker.

It’s no place for the squeamish. Some workers can’t stomach the gore — chopping up the meat and bones of hundreds of cattle, day after day. Cortez has been at it more than 30 years. It also can be very dangerous. Some workers have been slashed, burned or scarred. He has not.

Even so, Martin Cortez doesn’t recommend the work. The thrashing animals, the heavy lifting ... all that goes into putting steak and hamburger on America’s dinner tables, he says, makes for a backbreaking day.

“You know what I like to say to newcomers?” he says. “They don’t kill cows. They kill people.”

This, some would say, is The Jungle of 2006.

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Upton Sinclair Hits His Readers in the Stomach(Primary Source)

In 1904, in the midst of a bitter stockyard strike, socialist writer Upton Sinclair’s two-month visit to Chicago’s “Packingtown” area provided him with a wealth of material that he turned into his best-selling novel, The Jungle. The book is best known for revealing the unsanitary process by which animals became meat products. Yet Sinclair’s primary concern was not with the goods that were produced, but with the workers who produced them.

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History They Didn't Teach in School--Upton Sinclair

On September 20th, 1878, the muckraker and Socialist Upton Sinclair was born in Baltimore. Sinclair was perhaps the greatest "muckraker" of his era, a crusading journalist whose investigation of the sordid conditions of stockyard workers in Chicago led to the classic book The Jungle, still widely read today. He rose to prominence in the early 1900s, when other journalists such as Ida Tarbell and Lincoln Steffens were doing investigative work on corporate malfeasance and urban political corruption.

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1906: Upton Sinclair

1906: Upton Sinclair | Upton Sinclair meatpacking industry | Scoop.it

Upton Sinclair was born on September 20, 1878, in Baltimore, Maryland. His family had once belonged to the southern aristocracy but, at Sinclair’s birth, the family hovered near poverty.
Sinclair graduated from high school early and enrolled in the City College of New York at the age of fourteen. When he was fifteen, he began writing to support himself and help pay his college expenses.Sinclair published five novels between 1901 and 1906.

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