Untold History of PoC in superhero comics
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Marvel’s Diversity Issue: Screen Output Doesn’t Reflect Open-minded Comics

Marvel’s Diversity Issue: Screen Output Doesn’t Reflect Open-minded Comics | Untold History of PoC in superhero comics | Scoop.it
If you judged solely by the big-budget movie and TV adaptations, you'd have no idea how accepting the source material is right now.
Cynthia Cheng's insight:

This article highlights something important about the comics industry's influence (or lack of) on its movie adaptations. Although Marvel Entertainment has a wide range of diversity in its recent comics, that diversity is not reflected in its movies, where most of their heroes are white men. The cinematic side features few minorities-- and continue to be problematic. Some of these minority characters fit an ugly stereotype, which is discouraging since Marvel has such successful movies that could be its perfect opportunity to put its minority characters in the spotlight.

By understanding that comics are beginning to show diversity, but the movies connected to them continue to show a lack of minority representation, we can understand that comic book companies do not yet have as much faith for the success of their minority characters outside of the comic book medium.

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Marvel Comics Introduces Muslim Superhero

Marvel Comics Introduces Muslim Superhero | Untold History of PoC in superhero comics | Scoop.it
Marvel Comics latest new minority superhero is a teenaged Muslim-American girl of Pakistani descent who will take on the currently unused Ms. Marvel persona, the comics company announced on November 5.
Cynthia Cheng's insight:

This article discusses the newest superhero to be added to the Marvel universe-- Kamala Khan, a Muslim-American girl of Pakistani descent. Like Miles Morales, this character will be taking on the role of a well-known character (although obviously not as iconic as Spider-Man). She is part of Marvel's efforts to diversify their cast of characters, and is a character that struggles with her faith. 

This introduction of Kamala Khan helps me to understand the differences between the problems faced by the new superhero characters in Marvel and how those problems can connect to its audience. Whereas Miles Morales struggles with family problems and worries about school, it seems as though Kamala Khan struggles mainly with her identity.

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Everybody In Spandex: On Diversity And Superhero Comics

Everybody In Spandex: On Diversity And Superhero Comics | Untold History of PoC in superhero comics | Scoop.it
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This article discusses the mistakes made by comic book publishing companies like Marvel and DC. While they are trying to cater to new audiences with reboots and releasing new characters, many of these minority characters are not the leading characters and only make up a small percentage of the team itself. It also shoots down claims by companies that say that they are focusing on having a "good story" and thus cannot add in as much diversity. 

By discussing the problems concerning minority representation with these two giants in the industry, it helps to explain why the growth in diversity in comic books is so slow.

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Minorities in Comics Part 2 of 7: 10 People of Color/Hispanics in Comics

Minorities in Comics Part 2 of 7: 10 People of Color/Hispanics in Comics | Untold History of PoC in superhero comics | Scoop.it
Continuing our look at the representation of Minorities in Comics; People of Color and their portrayal in Comics.
Cynthia Cheng's insight:

This article reflects upon the very white history of superhero comics and discusses various well-known super heroes of color, as well as why their characters are good representations by defying stereotypes.  

This is a useful source in that it provides a number of examples of positive heroes of color, and discusses the positive aspects of each character listed.

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Race and Racism in Classic Superhero Comics HD (Superman, Captain America, The Spirit)

In this short documentary, historian Darren R. Reid explores the role played by race and racism in the golden age of superhero comics in the 1930s and 1940s....
Cynthia Cheng's insight:

The narrator in this video analyzes the racist caricatures of the non-white characters of early superhero comics. He comments that the exaggerated physical qualities provided a contrast against the handsome, white male protagonist that allowed the main character to seem even more extraordinary. In the video, black and Asian characters are represented as sidekicks and antagonists, respectively.

This helps give an understanding of representation of minorities in earlier comics, and shows how racism in these comics may have contributed to the slow addition of minorities in comics later on.

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MILES MORALES & ME: Why biracial Spider-Man matters

MILES MORALES & ME: Why biracial Spider-Man matters | Untold History of PoC in superhero comics | Scoop.it
As Marvel introduces its new half-black half-Latino Spidey, a fanboy of color shares what the new character means to him — even amid the spate of hateful comments.
Cynthia Cheng's insight:

This article records one comics fan's reaction to the discovery that the new Spider-Man, Miles Morales, would be bi-racial.
Marvel is beginning to cater to its minority comic-book fans by adjusting its cast of characters to reflect the diversity of its American fanbase. 

The writer acknowledges that, while this is a big step forward for Marvel, the decision is also receiving heavy criticism from part of the fanbase. 

The content covered by this article is a realistic portrayal of the change in contemporary American superhero comic books and of the reactions it is receiving. 

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Changing Face: Diversity & Change in Comic Books and Superhero Movies

Changing Face: Diversity & Change in Comic Books and Superhero Movies | Untold History of PoC in superhero comics | Scoop.it
From a black Perry White to a Black/Latino Spider-Man: We discuss the issues of diversity and change in regards to comic books and superhero movies.
Cynthia Cheng's insight:

This article discusses the negative opinions toward changing the race of an established character, such as in the movie adaptations of comic books. The writer states that the character comes before race-- by examining the character's background, living situation, and objective, readers can determine whether changing that character's race would be sensible or believable. For example, it would not be entirely believable if Batman was black.

I thought that this was an interesting point about comic characters and race, and it gives rise to interesting thoughts on racebending characters. 

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Black superheroes forever changed comic books » peoplesworld

Black superheroes forever changed comic books » peoplesworld | Untold History of PoC in superhero comics | Scoop.it
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This article discusses a novel that analyzes the history of Black superheroes in American pop culture. It reviews some of the more significant Black heroes like Luke Cage and Black Panther, and explains how their origins are linked to the American history.

It also discusses the introduction of the discussion of racism in mainstream comics, as well as some of the specific issues that contemporary Black superheroes address in their respective series. 

By briefly explaining the history of Black superheroes in comics, it helps explain the gradual change of the racial landscape of American mainstream comic books.

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Who Gets To Be A Superhero? Race And Identity In Comics

Who Gets To Be A Superhero? Race And Identity In Comics | Untold History of PoC in superhero comics | Scoop.it
Artist Orion Martin recently posted several images reimagining X-Men characters as people of color. This touched off a conversation about race in comic book worlds, and how these comic book depictions relate to real life.
Cynthia Cheng's insight:

This article discusses minorities and comics, largely focusing on comic book fans' reactions to a lack of representation.

It focuses largely on Marvel's X-Men series, and how a team largely comprised of white heterosexual characters suffer from alienation and prejudice. These problems reflect the problems of people of color in America, X-Men reinforces these problems by having these white characters face said problems instead. It discusses how various fans race-bend the characters from white to black, and how changing their race changes the reasoning behind their characters. 

This article is very valuable in reflecting the reactions of comic book fans to the lack of PoC representation in superhero comics. It also reflects problems in mainstream comics like X-Men, and shows the industry's inability to accept readers outside of the white male audience.

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Tribal Force, the First Comic to Feature a Team of Native American Superheroes ... - Smithsonian

Tribal Force, the First Comic to Feature a Team of Native American Superheroes ...
Smithsonian
Since the chiseled white jaws of Superman and Captain America first started gracing comics, the industry has made some efforts to address this.
Cynthia Cheng's insight:

This article describes some of the basic desires of minority comic creators: to have comics that address actual problems faced by minorities today, explore culture, and to represent the true diversity of America.

It highlights an upcoming "Tribal Force" comic, and the information given is especially useful toward understanding PoC superhero comics by giving specific examples of some of the real-life issues of Native Americans that the heroes in the comic will have to address.

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