Unschooling
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Some may call it unschooling, I call it educational neglect

Some may call it unschooling, I call it educational neglect | Unschooling | Scoop.it
The ninja twins take aim to protect homeschooling
UPDATED Wednesday 6:05pm. It has become apparent that I need to put a disclaim
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

"Just because you are a failure at teaching reading, does not mean that your child is unwilling to learn to read." 

"Unschooling is merely a lazy mother's excuse for educational neglect!"

These are two very strong quotes from this article against unschooling. These two quotes stood out to me becaue they seemed to come from a greatly uneducated view on unschoolers and the reasons they do what they do. While I will be honest and say that I did understand certain points that this parent made, I will also that that I felt like it was very skewed. 

The part that I do question and wonder like this parent is how letting a child play video games all day simply becuase they want to is something that is okay. This may come from my upbringing and the way my parents made sure we were out doing other things besides being glued to a TV screen or handheld device. I agreed with this part but not with her continuing to call most unschooling mothers lazy because of this. I don't think that unschooling parents are just trying to get by without helping their children in school, they really do believe and have faith in their children that a lot of people don't. They see that their child will show interest in something that will spark their love for learning. 

I also have been questioning the whole scenario with reading and unschooled children not learning until they're around 10 years old or maybe even older. I know that reading is difficult for many kids and that maybe the pressure of having to learn makes it unappealing as well, but I also think it's beneficial to learn early. Once you learn how to read, there is a sense of independence that comes from it and being able to learn things for yourself because you have the ability to do so. As a child, once I did learn to read it was an exciting moment. I do see where the unschooling parents come from as well, and if a child doesn't find the urge to read early then it's okay becuase they'll realize later. It's a very intersting part of school, reading and I think whatever honestly works for the child in the end will be okay, as long as the parent is sure that their interest isn't there yet.

This article both frustrated me and had me wondering the same thins because the author seemed like she wasn't as exposed to unschoolers as she should be to be making these generalizations. She said she had met a good number of unschoolers that were the way that she describes but there is no way that they all are and it's not fair the way she made bold statements about them all. This is a blog post that made me sympathize more for unschoolers and the way others view them.  

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Unschoolers learn what they want, when they want

Unschoolers learn what they want, when they want | Unschooling | Scoop.it
Six-year-old Karina Ricci doesn't ever have a typical day. She has no schedule to follow, no lessons to complete.
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

I always find it interesting the manner in which unschoolers and their parents talk about why they believe what they do and the way their children grow. Like most people it stresses me out thinking that I would have literally had no structure and could just do nothing if I wanted to. However, I do believe that as humans we all want to learn and we are all have curiosity which will then lead to investigating something. Then, as a teacher I wonder well then, what is my purpose in things like this, why do I want to go off and try to teach children things that they aren't interested in. 

I do like the idea that unschooling allows the students to grow and expand in topics and subjects that truely interest them and that will lead them to a future that they want. At the same time, I agree with Professor Steven Schlozman in this article worrying that complete lack of structure isn't the best way and we need a middle ground between the way our education system is now and the way unschooling is done. 

The statistic that 30% more unschoolers go to college than students who went through a traditional K-12 education system is very interesting but I also feel like it's difficult to compare because of the vast difference in the number of students who are unschooled and who are traditionally schooled. I do see why it would be more appealing for students who have had the opportunity to really follow their interests and enjoy learning and education to continue on to higher learning compared to those who have been forced to learn what the school dictates and get good grades. It's all honestly a very interesting concept that I'm still trying to wrap my head around. 

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Unschooling: A true education?

Most parents send their children to school because their parents sent them. For many, school is embedded in our culture. A minority choose home schooling as ...
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

I think this was a good insight into the way unschooling households run. I enjoyed seeing the way that these parent allow their children to play and do the things that they want while at the same time guidign them in a direction that will be helpful. The mother makes sure to have books and things placed around the house that will spark interests that the children are already dispalying. I also think that this documentary would open the eyes of people who think that children may just sit and do nothing all day. However, these children go outside play around, read, and the get to use an ipad to teach themselves things. The fact that they are learning about the water cycle is something that I found adorable because it may seem complicated but they're learning about things in a way that makes it seem more fun, through song, becaues we all love singing. 

I do still sympathize with the professor that education needs some type of structure. However, I feel that this mother balances it in a way that works better than complete lack of structure. When the resources are available in such plain sight to a child they will pick them up rather than if you wait for a child to come up to you and ask you for them. Overall, this is a good eye opening video that allows us to see the way an unschooling household may go despite preconceived thoughts

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I'm Unschooled. Yes, I Can Write.: The Cons of Unschooling

I'm Unschooled. Yes, I Can Write.: The Cons of Unschooling | Unschooling | Scoop.it
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

I really enjoyed reading this article because it's often hard to find people who will honestly tell you the true hardships of something they love so much. She was a unschooler who knows that there is no way she would have succeeded and been as content with traditional schooling but I was glad that she can still speak of the harder things that come along with unschooling. However, these hardships she speaks of have to do more with the way others perceive their situations as unschoolers.

The things she brings up are the constant questioning because people don't understand things that are different from traditional practices. With her bringing this up it makes me feel bad because I know I had and still have so many questions because I''m slightly unable to comprehend how it works with learning everything. I think that if it works for them, then there isn't anything wrong, I personally just don't understand so I would probably be one to ask a ton of questions. With her pointing it out it makes me reflect and think about how difficult it is to do something with people constantly judging and questioning so I would try to be better about it if I ever get the opportunity to meet someone who was unschooled. 

Another "con" or hardship she brings up is the lack of support that they have given that most of the surrounding groups are for more traditional homeschoolers. There isn't a problem with unschoolers joining these, but she points out that they're usually more Christian and still believe in traditional schooling, just at home. I sympathize for this because it's easier to be confident in what you're doing when you have a good group of people that also understand and can help ou through. The fact that traditional homeschoolers also see unschoolers as being so different opens my eyes to how strong these students must be in order to deal with staying firm in their beliefs of unschooling. I genuinely applaud them for continuing in the way they believe school should be done. 

The last thing that stood out to me was her bringing up how unschoolers don't get a "graduation" where they are handed a diploma and wear caps and gowns and everything we see as being the finish line of our K-12 education. I know personally that graduation was something I always looked forward to, not only to get a diploma but to cross the stage and show many people that you made it to the end of this part of education. However, I love that she points out how graduation doesn't make sense because you can't graduate from learning since you are constantly learning. I find it very intriguing that every unschoolers "graduation" is something that they find special to congratulate themselves but that they are still continuing to learn. We never do stop learning and I REALLY enjoy the way unschoolers perceive graduation. 

Overall, I enjoyed this sincere blog post because it opened my eyes to the experience of an actual unschooler who is living her life and can still reflect on the harder parts of being the odd one out in education. 

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Unschooling – Radical Moves in Education

Unschooling – Radical Moves in Education | Unschooling | Scoop.it
Radical Unschooling is capturing the attention and imagination of parents and educators the world over. So what is unschooling?
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

This is agreat article to understand the basic principles and beliefs of unschooling in a way that isn't bragging, per se. Given that unschooling was a completely new idea to me this semester I thought that this was written in a way that helped me understand it better and to help me see why it works for some and maybe not others. A key part of unschooling that I think is great is the way that it teaches students to be able to educate themselves if and when they need to because they learn how to find information when their curiosity strikes. They are more independent in this way and I think that is something that should be better adopted in traditonal schooling. 

The difference between homeschooling and unschooling was also a part that I was more confused about because they seemed similar to me in the first place until I realized that the principles are still slightly different. Homeschooling is still focusing on the education curriculum in similar way to a traditional school. However, with this curriculum the homeschoolers teacher or parent has the opportunity to gear it towards the individual child. There is more guidance in homeschooling than unschooling and there is also more of a parents beliefs being put onto the child. Unschooling gives the children free reign to explore the things that they want to focus on and through these things they can begin to learn the basics. 

One of the things that continues to worry me with unschooling is the fact that ther may be students who aren't self-motivated, and that is a HUGE part of unschooling. However, this article does bring up the fact that no child will ever truely just want to sit blankly and do nothing, they will eventually explore some interest that a parent can then facilitate learning with. 

An unschooling parent has to have an immense amount of trust in their children for their future. I admire this and I understand the values that unschooling is founded upon but I also like structure and so I am continuing to realize that I need to find a middle ground as a teacher and later as a parent between traditional and unschooling. Both types need a page from each others book in my opinon, but whatever works for the child is all that matters. 

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Reflections from an Unschooling Parent

Reflections from an Unschooling Parent | Unschooling | Scoop.it
My Role I've been an unshooling parent now for almost three years. Recently I have found myself reflecting on the role I play in contributing to my son's edu
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

Yay, this article made me happy because it was a reflection not only on her son but also on the way unschooling affects her as a mother. One quote that I enjoyed is this, "Teaching a child happens without the formality of "teaching", whether a family is unschooling or not." The reason that I liked what she said here was because she then expanded on the way that children learn from their experiences and from the things that they observe from the people around them. Children are a product of those people that surround them and the characteristics that they hold and will pass on whether they mean to or not. She knows that in order for her son to be a happy and good person, that she needs to learn more about herself and so be a good role model for her son. Given that not only is her son unschooled but that they travel and he gets to experience new environments as a classroom, they encounter a variety of weird things. Reflecting on these and learning from them in a non-judgemental way helps her son Milo to grow himself. 

The reason I really enjoyed this blog post is because it doesn't come off as pretentious like I feel some posts on unschooling do, saying that unschoolers are essentially better, period. This mother reflects on the way she is involved in her sons learning and this can translate over to parents of any child, unschooled or not. Parents of traditionally schooled children still play a major role in the development of their child especially since they are exposed to many personalities that parents have no type of control over in the school setting. Any and all parents could learn from reading this so that they can have a better understanding of the way in which whoever they are reflects onto their children who very often grow up to be the same way. This mothers reflection on unschooling is one that isn't purely on the school subjects like math and reading and the way her son learns this, but rather the way that both her son and her are growing and learning to be better people throught their observations around the world. This is a principle of learning that should not only be so prevalent in unschooling, but in the lives of young children everywhere. Learning doesn't stop and children learn from the role models in their life, be that a teacher, their parent, or someone they meet on the streets of another country. 

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Education is the Work of Teachers, not Hackers

Education is the Work of Teachers, not Hackers | Unschooling | Scoop.it
WHEN I LOOK BACK at my education, I am struck not by how much I learned but by how much I was taught
Kassandra Saravia's insight:

Well one. I love the way that Mr. Wieseltier loves and praises teachers as being those that help a student truely gain knowledge rather than just information. This is something that I also believe teachers are supposed to do though I know that nowadays it seems more like teachers just spew information that students then need to regurgitate but that is for another topic board. He brings up that unschooling and homeschooling is suddenly putting the pressures of education onto people who aren't necessarily qualified in helping a student understand and be knowledgable of material but rather who help with just stating facts. 

He also brings up Dale Stephens who was unschooled and then decided to continue that into higher education. His idea seems to appeal to entrepreneurship over the other topics that want to be followed into college but then again, it may be right for those entrepreneurs. Mr. Wieseltier also talks about the way that this is going against traditional schooling in the way that it is a movement against the "useless" studies that come along with it. But who is to say which studies are "useless" when everyone has different likes and dislikes. 

Mr. Wieseltier says, "Surely the primary objectives of education are the formation of the self and the formation of the citizen" and I cannot help but to agree with this to a far extent. Schools and teachers that can help well round students are helping to be sure that they do not grow up to be ignorant members of society, unaware of the ways that they can and should contribute. What I believe that the author of this article is saying isn't to against unschooling before college but rather, the way it's being approached in higher education by Dale Stephens as a type of entrepreneurship which isn't the way education helps to form a person. 

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Learning Approach Uncollege: Dale Stephens at TEDxPlazaCibeles

Dale J. (the "J" is for "Jasper") Stephens brings a unique perspective on the future of education, talent, and innovation. He is a sought-after speaker and e...
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