Ultrasonic Technnology
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Aalap Shah
Scoop.it!

Where next for wireless charging? - Stuff.tv

Where next for wireless charging? - Stuff.tv | Ultrasonic Technnology | Scoop.it
Where next for wireless charging? Stuff.tv The idea for using ultrasound to transmit energy to circuits was patented back in 2004, and that document includes a description for focussing a “pencil thin” beam of ultrasound onto a piezoelectronic...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Aalap Shah from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Midair levitation of objects using sound waves

The essence of levitation technology is the countervailing of gravity. It is known that an ultrasound standing wave is capable of suspending small particles at its sound pressure nodes and, so far, this method has been used to levitate lightweight particles, small creatures, and water droplets.
The acoustic axis of the ultrasound beam in these previous studies was parallel to the gravitational force, and the levitated objects were manipulated along the fixed axis (i.e. one-dimensionally) by controlling the phases or frequencies of bolted Langevin-type transducers. In the present study, we considered extended acoustic manipulation whereby millimetre-sized particles were levitated and moved three-dimensionally by localised ultrasonic standing waves, which were generated by ultrasonic phased arrays. Our manipulation system has two original features. One is the direction of the ultrasound beam, which is arbitrary because the force acting toward its centre is also utilised. The other is the manipulation principle by which a localised standing wave is generated at an arbitrary position and moved three-dimensionally by opposed and ultrasonic phased arrays. We experimentally confirmed that various materials could be manipulated by our proposed method.

Yoichi Ochiai, Takayuki Hoshi, Jun Rekimoto: Three-dimensional Mid-air Acoustic Manipulation by Ultrasonic Phased Arrays arXiv:1312.4006 http://arxiv.org/abs/1312.4006


Yoichi Ochiai (The University of Tokyo)
Takayuki Hoshi (Nagoya Institute of Technology)
Jun Rekimoto (The University of Tokyo / Sony CSL)

http://96ochiai.ws/3DOFacoustic ;
contact: yoichi.ochiai@me.com


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Rescooped by Aalap Shah from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Tiny single-chip device to provide real-time ultrasonic 3D images from inside the heart and blood vessels

Tiny single-chip device to provide real-time ultrasonic 3D images from inside the heart and blood vessels | Ultrasonic Technnology | Scoop.it

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have developed the technology for a catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels. With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons working in the heart, and potentially allow more of patients’ clogged arteries to be cleared without major surgery.


The device integrates ultrasound transducers with processing electronics on a single 1.4 millimeter  CMOS silicon chip. On-chip processing of signals allows data from more than a hundred elements on the device to be transmitted using just 13 tiny cables, permitting it to easily travel through circuitous blood vessels. The forward-looking images produced by the device would provide significantly more information than existing cross-sectional ultrasound.


“Our device will allow doctors to see the whole volume that is in front of them within a blood vessel,” said F. Levent Degertekin, a professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. “This will give cardiologists the equivalent of a flashlight so they can see blockages ahead of them in occluded arteries. It has the potential for reducing the amount of surgery that must be done to clear these vessels.”


“If you’re a doctor, you want to see what is going on inside the arteries and inside the heart, but most of the devices being used for this today provide only cross-sectional images,” Degertekin explained. “If you have an artery that is totally blocked, for example, you need to see the front, back and sidewalls altogether. That kind of information is basically not available at this time.”

 

The single chip device combines capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays with front-end CMOS electronics technology to provide three-dimensional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echography (ICE) images.


Researchers have developed and tested a prototype able to provide image data at 60 frames per second. The researchers expect to conduct animal trials to demonstrate the device’s potential applications. They ultimately expect to license the technology to an established medical diagnostic firm to conduct the clinical trials necessary to obtain FDA approval.

 

For the future, Degertekin hopes to develop a version of the device that could guide interventions in the heart under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Other plans include further reducing the size of the device to place it on a 400-micron diameter guide wire.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Aalap Shah
Scoop.it!

Samsung might equip Galaxy Note 4 with Ultrasonic Cover: Report - Tech Times

Samsung might equip Galaxy Note 4 with Ultrasonic Cover: Report - Tech Times | Ultrasonic Technnology | Scoop.it
Tech Times Samsung might equip Galaxy Note 4 with Ultrasonic Cover: Report Tech Times SamMobile cites its reliable sources and reports that the rumored Ultrasonic Cover will have an ultrasonic sensor that will detect objects near the user of the...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Aalap Shah from WiFiNovation
Scoop.it!

The next frontier of wireless tech? Your body

The next frontier of wireless tech? Your body | Ultrasonic Technnology | Scoop.it

The military has for decades used sonar for underwater communication. Now, researchers at the University at Buffalo are developing a miniaturized version of the same technology to be applied inside the human body to treat diseases such as diabetes and heart failure in real time.

The advancement relies on sensors that use ultrasounds -- the same inaudible sound waves used by the navy for sonar and doctors for sonograms -- to wirelessly share information between medical devices implanted in or worn by people.


Via WiFiNovation
more...
No comment yet.