John Spargo and Child Labor
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John Spargo and Child Labor
U.S. History Project
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The Bitter Cry Of Children

John Spargo revealed the evils of child labor. When the National Child Labor Committee was formed,factory inspectors had the job of enforcing child labor laws that kept children out of factories. But it was often ignored. During inspections children hid. Employers & parents told their children to lie about their age. So they could continue working to earn money.

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Young Boy In Factory (Primary Documents #3)

Young Boy In Factory (Primary Documents #3) | John Spargo and Child Labor | Scoop.it

The picture above is Leo. He was 8 years old. He worked in a textile factory in Tennessee in 1910. 

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John Spargo : Biography

John Spargo : Biography | John Spargo and Child Labor | Scoop.it

John Spargo was born in Longdowns, Cornwall. He was a politic and socialist. He moved to the U.S. in February 1901 with his wife. He didn't return to England. His wife died in 1904. In 1905 he remarried. They had 2 kids. One died in his childhood. He wrote a book called The Bitter Cry Of Children . The book exposed the horrificing working conditions of child laborers. He also believed in women rights and civil rights for African Americans but he wanted restrictions of immigrants. He lost interest in politics and spend his time to the Bennington Museum. He died in 1966.

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Child Labor In Factory (Primary Document #1)

Child Labor In Factory (Primary Document #1) | John Spargo and Child Labor | Scoop.it

The companies could cut labor cost by hiring children to do the work. The children above are working in a factory. They look about 5 or 7. No matter what age they are they shouldn't be working. They should be enjoying the outdoors and playing with their friends.

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Child Labor in U.S. History - (Progress Era)

Child Labor in U.S. History - (Progress Era) | John Spargo and Child Labor | Scoop.it

Forms of child labor, including indentured servitude and child slavery, have existed throughout American history. As industrialization moved workers from farms and home workshops into urban areas and factory work, children were often preferred, because factory owners viewed them as more manageable, cheaper, and less likely to strike. Growing opposition to child labor in the North caused many factories to move to the South. By 1900, states varied considerably in whether they had child labor standards and in their content and degree of enforcement. By then, American children worked in large numbers in mines, glass factories, textiles, agriculture, canneries, home industries, and as newsboys, messengers, bootblacks, and peddlers.

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How Hard Is It To Work In A Factory? Watch Video To Find Out (Child Labor)

Child Labor: 11 year-old Halima sews clothing for Hanes.National Labor Committee interview with Halima who works at a factory in Bangladesh making clothing for Hanes. 

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The Result Of Having Children Working (Primary Document #2)

The Result Of Having Children Working (Primary Document #2) | John Spargo and Child Labor | Scoop.it

The boy above he looks about 7 or 8. He lost his arm due to working in a factory. He was running saw in a box factory. This is the price of child labor. It's so sad to see that he is so young and now for the rest of his life he has only one arm.

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Child Labor during the Progressive Era

Child Labor during the Progressive Era | John Spargo and Child Labor | Scoop.it

These days the talk is about adult-olescence, or the seeming extention of adolescence well into ones twenties. But the idea that children should have a childhood at all is actually pretty recent. Before industrialization, when families tended to work their own land, children got to work as soon as they were able. Being apprentices to their parents was the difference between life and death.

Industrialization brought a whole new kind of work: wage work that occurred outside the home. At that time, it made perfect sense that kids would work, as they’d be working on the farm all along. Only later did we decide that working outside the home was different than working at it and that, perhaps, children working outside of the home needed protection. The first federal law regulating child labor was passed in 1938.

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Child Labor is still an issue in today's societies around the world

Child Labor is still an issue in today's societies around the world | John Spargo and Child Labor | Scoop.it
Child labor is a crime committed against nearly 220 million children, or one in every seven, ages 5 to 17, around the world. 250,000 children are illegally employed by the rug industry. Learn more about the facts and figures of child labor.
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