Twit4D
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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Central Asia: An Exception to the “Cute Cats” Theory of Internet Revolution by Sarah Kendzior

Zuckerman’s theory is a refreshing alternative to the common caricature of internet users in authoritarian states as revolutionaries in waiting. But it suffers from a fallacy that plagues much of internet scholarship: studies of the effectiveness of the internet in fomenting revolution are usually limited to where the internet was effective, because those successes, by definition, are the ones we know. The “failures” – the many countries where the circulation of evidence of state crimes through social media prompts no change in state practices, and in some cases, dissuades citizens from joining activist causes – tend to go unmentioned. They are, I suspect, more the norm than the exception, and they have proven the rule in former Soviet authoritarian states.
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Predictable Surprises: 10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard

Predictable Surprises:  10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Between now and 2015, there will be some predictable crises in global politics. The most predictable political crises have become the moments in which dictators ask tech-savvy voters to participate in a rigged election. Social media allows people to call out big organized lies, so rigged elections have become sensitive moments in international politics. Since we know these moments are on their way, and both foreign policy makers and journalists act surprised when they arrive, we can call such moments "predictable surprises".

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