Twit4D
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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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How Twitter’s New Policy Rewards Elite Activism by Sarah Kendzior

On Thursday, Twitter announced that it would begin to selectively block tweets on a country by country basis. The decision prompted an immediate outcry from free speech advocates as well as a more measured response from scholars of social media, several of whom praised Twitter’s relative transparency while noting that it has no choice but to comply with the regulations of individual governments.

One of the most passionate defenders of Twitter’s new policy is Zeynep Tufekci, who described it as an “excellent policy which will be helpful to free-speech advocates”. Tufekci sees Twitter’s selective censorship as an improvement over the broad censorship practiced by other internet companies, in which content deemed offensive by one is deleted for all. Under the new guidelines, a tweet deemed inappropriate by the leaders of a particular country will only be censored within that country. To the rest of the world, it will be labeled as “blocked”, a development she describes as “excellent” because it renders state attempts to suppress speech transparent.

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How Luther went viral by the Economist

How Luther went viral by the Economist | Twit4D | Scoop.it
IT IS a familiar-sounding tale: after decades of simmering discontent a new form of media gives opponents of an authoritarian regime a way to express their views, register their solidarity and co-ordinate their actions. The protesters’ message spreads virally through social networks, making it impossible to suppress and highlighting the extent of public support for revolution. The combination of improved publishing technology and social networks is a catalyst for social change where previous efforts had failed.

That’s what happened in the Arab spring. It’s also what happened during the Reformation, nearly 500 years ago, when Martin Luther and his allies took the new media of their day—pamphlets, ballads and woodcuts—and circulated them through social networks to promote their message of religious reform.

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From Tehran to Tahrir: Social Media and Dynamics of Collective Action under Authoritarian Regimes by Zeynep Tufekci

From Tehran to Tahrir: Social Media and Dynamics of Collective Action under Authoritarian Regimes by Zeynep Tufekci | Twit4D | Scoop.it

What role did the new media ecology play in the ouster of long-standing dictators in Egypt and Tunisia as well as the continuing unrest across the region? In this talk, I present data from a large protester survey (n=1050) undertaken in Tahrir during February of 2011 and conceptually examine how the new media ecology, composed of satellite TVs, social media and cell phones, upsets the erstwhile stable dynamics of repression under “durable authoritarianism.” (Data collected by the Tahrir Data Project, run by the Engine Room research collective.) 

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Zeynep Tufekci: Social Media Tools of Dissent

A debate has been raging about what role social media played in Tunisia and now in Egypt.
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Morozov vs.(?) Tufekci at the US Naval Academy by Ethan Zuckerman

The conference is organized primarily by the naval midshipmen and it’s one of the best-run academic conferences I’ve attended. I had the great pleasure of delivering the opening keynote for the conference Tuesday morning – I’ll try to post those notes later this week – and these notes reflect my liveblogging from the audience of a very interesting conversation.
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Tunisia, Twitter, Aristotle, Social Media and Final and Efficient Causes by Zeynep Tufekci

A debate has been raging on the role social media—especially Facebook and Twitter— played in the apparently successful uprising in Tunisia. Most of the discussion seems to be centered around the use of the term “Twitter Revolution.”
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Social Media and the Arab Spring Zeynep Tufekci ITW by Marco Werman

Social Media and the Arab Spring  Zeynep Tufekci ITW by Marco Werman | Twit4D | Scoop.it
On December 17, 2010, a young unemployed man set himself on fire in Tunisia.

Mohammed Bouazizi took that desperate step in protest, after officials had blocked his attempts to make a living selling fruit on the street.

His self-immolation sparked a wave of anti-government protests, first in Tunisia, then all across the Middle East.

And technology and social media have played key roles in many of the pro-democracy movements of the Arab Spring. Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Zeynep Tufekci, a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

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The #freemona Perfect Storm: Dissent and the Networked Public Sphere by Zeynep Tufekci

The #freemona Perfect Storm: Dissent and the Networked Public Sphere by  Zeynep Tufekci | Twit4D | Scoop.it
It was a calm, quite night, almost nine o’clock, on the eve of Thanksgiving holiday when, out of the corner of my eye, a tweet shook me:

Egyptian-American writer and my friend Mona El Tahawy, who had cut her trip in North Africa short to join the exploding Tahrir protests in her native country, had just sent that out. Short, uncapitalized, clearly written in a hurry. And with that, she went silent.

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Zeynep Tufekci: Social Media Tools of Dissent

A debate has been raging about what role social media played in Tunisia and now in Egypt. Some claim sites like Facebook and Twitter were a catalyst for the ...
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Twitter and the Anti-Playstation Effect on War Coverage by Zeynep Tufekci

Twitter and the Anti-Playstation Effect on War Coverage by Zeynep Tufekci | Twit4D | Scoop.it
As I follow the remarkable political transformations ongoing in the Middle East and North Africa through social media, I’m struck by the depth of the difference between news curation and anchoring on Twitter versus Television. In this post, I’d like to argue that Television functions as a distancing technology while social media works in the opposite direction: through transparency of the process of narrative construction, through immediacy of the intermediaries, through removal of censorship over images and stories (television never shows the truly horrific pictures of war), and through person-to-person interactivity, social media news curation creates a sense of visceral and intimate connectivity, in direct contrast to television, which is explicitly constructed to separate the viewer from the events.
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Symposium: “Revolution 2.0? The Role of the Internet in the Uprisings from Tahrir Square and Beyond”

Symposium: “Revolution 2.0? The Role of the Internet in the Uprisings from Tahrir Square and Beyond” | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Audio from Revolutions 2.
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Can “Leaderless Revolutions” Stay Leaderless: Preferential Attachment, Iron Laws and Networks by Zeynep Tufekci

Can “Leaderless Revolutions” Stay Leaderless: Preferential Attachment, Iron Laws and Networks by Zeynep Tufekci | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Many commentators relate the diffuse, somewhat leaderless nature of the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia (and now spreading elsewhere) with the prominent role social-media-enabled peer-to-peer networks played in these movements. While I remain agnostic but open to the possibility that these movements are more diffuse partially due to the media ecology, it is wrong to assume that open networks “naturally” facilitate “leaderless” or horizontal structures. On the contrary, an examination of dynamics in such networks, and many examples from history, show that such set-ups often quickly evolve into very hierarchical and ossified networks not in spite of, but because of, their initial open nature.
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