Tuesday Tips
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Tuesday Tips
Free Weekly advice for Leaders and Managers
Curated by Connor Jordan
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Scorecards: 5 Steps to Get Started

Scorecards: 5 Steps to Get Started | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

A business scorecard is a simple, effective tool to help managers diagnose issues, identify weaknesses in processes and make strategic and tactical decisions.  If you don’t yet have a scorecard, but would like to get started here are 5 steps to take and get started today!

 

5 Steps to Get Started with Scorecards:

1- Know the Mission – Long before you start concerning yourself with all the numbers and how you’ll compile the actual data, you should ensure you and your team understand your company’s mission.  By understanding the mission you can further define how your team plays a role in accomplishing it, which will then shape what goes into your scorecard.

2- Define the Metrics – You and your team can work together to decide what can be measured, what should be measured and what needs to be measured.  In the end, keep only those metrics that align with the mission of your organization.

3- Create the Scorecard - Select the most appropriate, well-defined and attainable metrics to be included on your team scorecard.  Be sure to include at least one metric per focus area.  Follow the SMART criteria when defining each metric – (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Timely.)

4- Get in Alignment – To ensure that every team member is equally engaged in the process, assign ownership responsibilities to specific metrics on the scorecard.  The metric owner will be the person who collects and confirms the metric data for the team to review.

5- Use what You’ve Built – Your team scorecard is only useful if you use it in weekly meetings, review the data in a timely fashion and leverage current and historical data to make decisions and modify team activities.

 

http://processbasedleadership.com/2013/01/scorecards-5-steps-to-get-started/

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LIVE WEBINAR: “Scorecard Best Practices” on January 30th – Sign Up

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4 Big Questions about Your Metrics for 2013

4 Big Questions about Your Metrics for 2013 | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

For many managers, the  start of a New Year is a great time to evaluate their tools, techniques and  processes as they form their personal and team goals for the coming twelve  months.  One common tool that receives some attention is the business scorecard  and more specifically, the individual metrics, which are being used to evaluate  performance and make decisions.

 

4 Big  Questions about Your 2013 Performance Metrics:

Does the team have a  direct influence on the outcomes of each metric?

 

Does everyone on the  team understand each metrics’ objective?

 

Are we using a common  vocabulary when defining and later discussing metrics with other  teams?

 

Do our teams’  metrics align with and contribute to metric values on other scorecards in the  organization?

 

By asking these  questions, a manager can ensure that their scorecard is correctly aligned with  the organization’s strategy, the metrics are easily understood and team members  are given a fair opportunity to achieve the goals that are set.

http://processbasedleadership.com/2013/01/4-big-questions-about-your-metrics/

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Why You Can't Count on Employee Reviews

Why You Can't Count on Employee Reviews | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Why You Can’t Count on Employee Reviews

Leaders across North America have the best of intentions when it comes to employee performance reviews.  The review process should be about acknowledging achievements and working together with employees to develop their skills and careers.  Unfortunately, many leaders admit that annual reviews are more focused on innocuous evaluations and compensation adjustments.

 

FREE WEBINAR: http://processbasedleadership.com/webinar-registration/

Reinventing Your Annual Employee Performance Reviews

 

Albert Einstein is credited with saying “not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

 

How Employee Reviews have become Counterproductive

Procrastination Enabler – Knowing that you can put off...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/12/why-you-cant-count-on-employee-reviews/

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A Business Case for Banning Meetings

A Business Case for Banning Meetings | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

How many times in the past 3 months have you had the following thoughts: “What? We’re meeting again? About that? Really? Why?“ OK, so maybe you are one of the lucky few who only attend meetings that have a purpose, with clearly defined outcomes, and durations of less than 30 minutes.  The other 95% of us think you’re telling a fib, and/or we are very, very jealous.

 

The harsh, ugly reality is that most people include the word “meet” on their list of 4-letter words that you shouldn’t say around the office.  Meetings, in their current form, have deserved all the negative labels placed on them.  Like most people, I also mumble, groan and gripe when I’m pulled into a “quick meeting” that is given priority over the 27 other things I am trying to get done.  I’ve even shuffled my feet and stopped off at the water cooler or rest room unnecessarily to burn time before I enter the lion’s den.

 

full article at: http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/11/a-business-case-for-banning-meetings/

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Warning Signs of Unmotivated Employees

Warning Signs of Unmotivated Employees | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Many of today’s employees are intrinsically motivated.  They want to see their organization succeed, and they want to be a factor in that success.  However, several recent studies on Employee Engagement shine a light on the adverse affects of poorly defined processes, burdensome red tape, and conflicting messages from senior leaders.  These obstacles lead to a workforce that is frustrated and eventually unmotivated.

 

3 Behavioral Phases of Unmotivated Employees1) Burning Out. After several months of overcoming obstacle after obstacle, highly engaged employees begin to grow weary...

 

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/10/warning-signs-of-unmotivated-employees/

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How to Help Employees Prioritize Assignments

How to Help Employees Prioritize Assignments | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Many leaders today don’t have difficulty with assigning tasks to people on their team.  The real issues begin when leaders fail to provide additional support and guidance on the follow through and completion of those assignments.

 

What can leaders do to help employees prioritize their assignments and get more done?

How to Help Employees Prioritize Assignments

1) Set Due Dates. Timing is a major component to consider when deciding which task should be completed first.  Setting appropriate due dates will...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/10/how-to-help-employees-prioritize-assignments/

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How to Practice "What's Next?" Thinking

How to Practice "What's Next?" Thinking | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Leaders considering ways to ramp up their organization’s Continuous Improvement outcomes can implement a myriad of different quick-fix solutions.  However, one sure-fire way to revolutionize their organization’s prevailing culture and sustain meaningful results is to adopt a forward-looking approach called “What’s Next?” Thinking.

How to Practice “What’s Next?” Thinking

1. Congratulate; then Move On – Celebrate performance improvements, but don’t rest content on past results.  Keep an eye on future goals.

2. Be Real – Nothing harms teamwork and trust more than

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/09/tuesday-tip-how-to-practice-whats-next-thinking/

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5 Steps to Minimizing Performance Barriers

5 Steps to Minimizing Performance Barriers | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

When developing and maintaining a Continuous Improvement culture in organizations today, it is critical that leaders provide employees with a process for overcoming obstacles.  Whether anticipated, or unforeseen, barriers can easily derail employees’ efforts and cause a decline in performance outcomes.  To keep performance improvements on track leaders can follow a practical, five-step process.

5 Steps to Minimizing Performance Barriers...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/09/tuesday-tip-5-steps-to-minimizing-performance-barriers/

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How Leaders Influence the Work Climate

How Leaders Influence the Work Climate | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

A Work Climate is defined as the prevailing atmosphere as experienced by the employees.  In other words, what it feels like to work in a place.  As a leader, regardless of your formal role, you are part of what makes up the Work Climate.  You have a direct influence over the creation and maintenance of the Work Climate that you and your team members experience

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High Performing Work Climates are characterized as having clear communication, appropriate supervision of tasks, and a goal-focused culture where all employees are expected to contribute.  So how do create an atmosphere that is both positive and productive?


http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/08/tuesday-tip-how-leaders-influence-the-work-climate/


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A Leader's Role in Employee Development

A Leader's Role in Employee Development | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Today, world-class organizations recognize the high impact leaders have on employee development.  Learning, growing, and developing takes place on a daily basis in your work environment, not in a classroom.  Recognizing this will help organizations create a culture of continuous employee development based not on training videos and classes, but on how leaders model desired actions and behaviors.

 

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” -John Quincy Adams

 

4 Ways Leaders Can Influence Employee Development...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/08/a-leaders-role-in-employee-development/

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Why Performance Reports Have Gotten a Bad Name

Why Performance Reports Have Gotten a Bad Name | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Most organizations today use some type of performance tracking and reporting system making it easy for managers to run reports full of beautiful graphs and charts to facilitate review and discussion.   So why is it that some managers are met with blank stares and shrugged shoulders when their team sees these reports?

Common Reasons...

 

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/07/tuesday-tip-why-performance-reports-have-gotten-a-bad-name/

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Solving the Dysfunction between Functional Areas

Solving the Dysfunction between Functional Areas | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Today, many departments or business units could be described as “dysfunctional areas” rather than functional areas. Too often, they each operate with their own agendas.  They form their own departmental cultures.  And, they even have differing methods for defining and measuring success.

 

Dysfunction starts at the top. Quite often the most dysfunctional team in the entire organization is the Senior Leadership Team.  Since they are the group charged with the task of defining the mission and strategies, they need to work together, operate as one, and provide a framework for employees to follow in pursuit of the mission.

How to Solve the Dysfunction..

 

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/07/tuesday-tip-solving-the-dysfunction-between-functional-areas/

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Improve Your Listening Skills in Meetings

Improve Your Listening Skills in Meetings | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

One of the main reasons for attending meetings is to tell your colleagues about performance and the status or progress of various work activities.  Another, often overlooked, reason for attending meetings is to hear what those same colleagues have to say about their important initiatives and activities.  Being a good listener can be difficult if you aren’t properly prepared.

How to Improve Your Listening Skills...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/06/tuesday-tip-improve-your-listening-skills-in-meetings/

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The Difference Between Goals and Metrics

The Difference Between Goals and Metrics | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

A common mistake managers make today is confusing goals and metrics. Although you may find dozens of articles and online videos that mistakenly interchange the two terms, they are definitely not the same thing.  For example, a goal may “Increase annual revenue by 15%.”  Can you take this broad statement and turn it into a metric?  Not exactly.

 

The metrics you would define with regard to this goal must be more specific, easily measured, based on incremental improvements and allow you to demonstrate progress throughout the year as you strive to attain the goal.  The metrics would fall into a specific focus area, such as “Revenue” or “Sales.”

 

Examples of Metrics in Support of a Goal:
By taking the goal example of “Increase Annual Revenue by 15%,” we can define several measurable, meaningful scorecard metrics that would support more focus and attention on attaining this goal.

Increase number of new customers by 5 per month Increase average dollar amount per sale by 15% Improve median up sell amount per current customer by $3,000 per year Reduce accounts receivable default account payments by 20% per quarter

http://processbasedleadership.com/2013/01/the-difference-between-goals-and-metrics/

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Performance Reviews: What Employees Really Want

Performance Reviews: What Employees Really Want | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it
The most commonly used method for providing performance feedback to employees is the use of annual performance reviews. According to a recent study by Achievers out of San Francisco, only 2% of Human Resources executives think their annual reviews accomplish anything meaningful.


So, why do we continue these failing evaluations processes?

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/12/performance-reviews-what-employees-really-want/
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Why Annual Performance Reviews are a Bad Idea

Why Annual Performance Reviews are a Bad Idea | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Most organizations have a formal employee performance review process that use standard HR-approved appraisal forms and grading systems.  Quite often the outcomes of the reviews are tied directly to each employee’s annual compensation in the form of a raise, bonus or other such reward.

 

FREE WEBINAR: http://processbasedleadership.com/webinar-registration/

Reinventing Your Annual Employee Performance Reviews

 

Although these reviews are intended to provide constructive feedback and help employees understand how they can improve their skills and advance their careers, they unfortunately are poorly designed, poorly administered and are of little help to anyone giving or receiving them.

 

Three Reasons to Abolish Annual Reviews

 

1) Standards are Vague, Subjective and Open to Interpretation.

Because performance reviews are based on predefined, generalized standards, they hold little meaning for someone truly interested in hearing about how they are performing and how they can make improvements to their work.  These one-size-fits all appraisal templates usually leave the employee with more questions than answers.  If, as a manager, you are using a 5-point scale to judge your team members’ performance, do you grade on a curve?  Does anyone on your team get all 5’s?  If you have an employee scoring all 1’s and 2’s, does that reflect on your performance as their manager?  Should you even consider firing someone with scores that low?

 

2) Too little, too late.

Spending 15 minutes, once a year discussing an employee’s performance is far too insufficient to be useful in any way.  When you combine this infrequency with poor timing by conducting your reviews at year-end, you’re accomplishing a whole new level of insignificance.  Adding a review to the piles of other annual activities taking place, just confirms for employees how little you care about their careers and development.

 

3)So, now what?

Conducting performance appraisals as a stand-alone, snapshot-in-time event does nothing for organizations looking to create a culture of continuous improvement.  Without directly tying reviews to employee training and development initiatives, you can’t expect outcomes to be any different the following year when you dust off the evaluation forms and go through the motions again.

 

Unless your organization intends to use performance reviews to accurately appraise performance and use that information to develop training programs and create an overall culture of continuous improvement, then your organization should consider abolishing the annual review process altogether.  Appraising one’s performance should be done frequently, informally and objectively.

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End the Trend of Endless Meetings

End the Trend of Endless Meetings | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Generally speaking, people don’t like attending meetings.  One of the biggest gripes about meetings today is the amount of time spent in each one.  Studies show that people can only focus on one subject about 20 minutes before they begin daydreaming about a dozen other things.

 

Nearly all meeting attendees (91%) admit to daydreaming during meetings, while over one-third (39%) have dozed!*

 

How to Limit Time Spent in Your Meetings

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/10/end-the-trend-of-endless-meetings/

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How to Boost Accountability Levels

How to Boost Accountability Levels | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it
Boost Accountability Levels

Today, employees at all levels want to contribute and be successful.  They like to be involved in team efforts and to be seen as someone pulling their fair share of the weight.  Leaders can set the stage for employees and provide a boost to accountability levels by applying a practical, four-step process.

 

Your 4-step Accountability Booster Process:

1) Identify Accountability –Know it when you see it.  Create a way to bring attention and visibility to employees’ behaviors as they...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/10/tuesday-tip-how-to-boost-accountability-levels/

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Let Employees Accelerate Change

Let Employees Accelerate Change | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Traditional approaches to Continuous Improvement have leaders, or assigned CI personnel, driving the pace and degree of change with regard to higher performance.  This command-and-control style has become outdated.  Leaders can try a modern approach to fit today’s employees…

Steps for Letting Employees Accelerate Change

1) Set the Vision – Within the context of a CI project, leaders can communicate a vision

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/09/tuesday-tip-let-employees-accelerate-change/

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How to Encourage an Innovation Culture

How to Encourage an Innovation Culture | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

In order to remain competitive, organizations need to innovate in all areas and at all levels, not only with new products or services.  Innovation is important for finding ways to cut costs, save time, improve customer service, and improve inter-departmental communication, and so on.

 

Inherently, with innovation comes change.  With change there are unknowns, which lead to anxiety and resistance to the change.  Without strong and supportive leadership, the failure rate of implementing innovations is quite high, if not guaranteed.  So, how does senior leadership provide the tools, processes, and necessary conditions to develop an Innovation Culture in their organization?

 

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/09/how-to-encourage-an-innovation-culture/

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3 Reasons Employees Don’t Meet Performance Expectations

3 Reasons Employees Don’t Meet Performance Expectations | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Being an effective leader is less about you and your skills and more about what you are able to get accomplished with the team around you.  In short, it’s all about getting things done without always doing them yourself.

3 Reasons Employees Don’t Meet Performance Expectations

they don’t know what to do they don’t know how to do it they don’t want to (lack desire or motivation) The Fixes:

What to do – What gets measured...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/09/3-reasons-employees-don%E2%80%99t-meet-performance-expectations/

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Four Steps in Effective Delegation

Four Steps in Effective Delegation | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Leaders are asked to get many things accomplished with limited time and resources.  They can’t possibly do everything themselves, therefore it’s critical for leaders to learn how to properly delegate.  Delegation is not “passing the buck” to others as responsibility still lies with the leader for those tasks being delegated.  Effective delegation takes effort, preparation, and practice.

Four Steps in Effective Delegation...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/08/tuesday-tip-four-steps-in-effective-delegation/

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Develop Your Leadership Portfolio

Develop Your Leadership Portfolio | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Whether new to a leadership role or a seasoned veteran, understanding your current capabilities and areas for improvement is a good start for building your leadership skills. As a leader, you may have to reinvent how you think, evaluate and engage others, and demonstrate behaviors. Successful leaders are willing to surrender to a journey of learning, growing, changing and teaching others.


Develop Your Leadership Portfolio
Create a structured document to capture...

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/07/tuesday-tip-develop-your-leadership-portfolio/

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Poor Performance or Poor Scorecard?

Poor Performance or Poor Scorecard? | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

What do you do when you know your team is performing well, but when looking at your scorecard it gives you the impression that everything is going wrong?  Is your scorecard telling a story far different than what your instincts are telling you?  Well, you are not alone, many managers today share this same frustration.  The good news is that something can be done about it.

 

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/07/poor-performance-or-poor-scorecard/

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On what do you base Business Decisions?

On what do you base Business Decisions? | Tuesday Tips | Scoop.it

Decisions, Decisions, Decisions.  Leaders face important business decisions every day.  To help you refine your decision making skills you can use one of several decision making models.  There are 6-step models, 9-step models, and even systems designed to score your decision making accuracy.  One thing for sure, is that you need to have appropriate, timely, and meaningful data to help you make the best decisions.

 

A Business Scorecard, when done correctly, will help you strengthen your decision making skills.  Beyond just collecting a bunch of data, is your system optimized for decision making?

http://processbasedleadership.com/2012/07/tuesday-tip-on-what-do-you-base-business-decisions/

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