TSI Chris Traxler
16 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Pro Resource from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Why going “green” matters for high-performance computing

Why going “green” matters for high-performance computing | TSI Chris Traxler | Scoop.it
High-performance computing applications can help businesses take advantage of the lower energy costs a green data center offers, no matter where it’s located.
Related research and analysis from Gigaom Research:
Subscriber content.

Via Thomas Faltin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pro Resource
Scoop.it!

Shadow IT's Impact on Federal Government

IT services are easier than ever to procure and provision -- leading to the rise of so-called "shadow IT" groups, where executives are using cloud computing ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pro Resource from Business Tips
Scoop.it!

The benefits of Accepting Credit Card Payments for Small Business

The benefits of Accepting Credit Card Payments for Small Business | TSI Chris Traxler | Scoop.it
An infographic outlining the benefits of accepting credit cards payments for Small Business

Via TechinBiz
more...
BSN's curator insight, August 26, 2014 6:09 AM

The benefits of Accepting Credit Card Payments for Small Business.

#business #smallbusiness

Progressive training's curator insight, August 27, 2014 5:11 AM

The benefits of Accepting Credit Card Payments for Small Business

Rescooped by Pro Resource from Healthcare and Technology news
Scoop.it!

Snooping staff still top security issue | Healthcare IT News

Snooping staff still top security issue | Healthcare IT News | TSI Chris Traxler | Scoop.it

When it comes to data breaches, hacking and loss or theft of unencrypted devices are far from healthcare security professionals' only concerns. Employee snooping and insider misuse also prove to be among the biggest privacy threats in the healthcare sector today.     Just last week, a former Tufts Health Plan employee was convicted of disclosing patient information in a fraudulent tax refund scheme after stealing the personal data of more than 8,700 members. The former employee, Emeline Lubin, started working at Tufts Health Plan in Watertown, Mass., back in 2010. For that time, Lubin sent lists of member data to a Florida man in efforts to file false income tax returns. Lubin could face up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.    [See also: 4-year long HIPAA breach uncovered.]   It's cases like this that have many healthcare security officials on edge.   "The biggest risk, as much as we talk about the hackers and people trying to get in and steal healthcare data, I think the biggest risk is still the individual employee who maybe forgot what the policy was and does something they shouldn't do," said Texas Health Resources Chief Information Officer Ed Marx, in an interview with Healthcare IT News, this month.     Marx isn't alone in thinking this. A whopping 80 percent of healthcare IT security professionals identified snooping on personal patient information by employees to be the top threat motivator for breaches, according to a 2013 HIMSS security survey released earlier this year.    [See also: Healthcare security stuck in Stone Age.]   Verizon's 2014 Data Breach Investigations spring report released also highlighted numbers pertaining to unauthorized access. Officials found that the healthcare sector saw its second highest numbers in the insider misuse category (second only to loss/ theft), with 15 percent of healthcare's security incidences due to insider misuse. That's higher than 13 other industries outlined in the report. Only the administrative, mining, public sector, real estate and transportation industries saw bigger numbers.    Speaking to Healthcare IT News in April, Suzanne Widup, senior analyst on the Verizon RISK team, said they see insider misuse "quite a bit," especially affiliated with organized crime groups where they either have someone recruited as an insider, or they are specifically sent to get a job in healthcare where they will eventually facilitate access to sensitive information that's easily monetized, like Social Security numbers associated with patient records, for instance.    There's also the employee snooping problem, which Widup said is actually underreported.    The biggest way to avoid this is auditing your users and the data, said Widup. "You need to know who has the data, who has access the data, and you need to monitor it," she said. "When you see organizations implement some sort of auditing scheme, suddenly they start finding a lot of stuff they couldn't see before."   Indeed, unauthorized access/disclosures are involved in nearly 20 percent of all HIPAA breaches reported by the Office for Civil Rights, the HHS division responsible for investigating HIPAA violations.     [See also: Breach alert: Hackers swipe data of 4.5M.]   Several breaches involving employee snooping have already been reported in recent months.    In December, for instance, the five-hospital Riverside Health System in southeast Virginia notified close to 1,000 of its patientsthat their protected health information had been compromised after a former RHS employee inappropriately accessed patients' Social Security numbers and electronic medical records. The breach was ongoing for four years before health system officials discovered the employee had been inappropriately accessing data after conducting a random audit.   

In October 2013, a similar incident transpired at the Iowa-based UnityPoint Health after they notified nearly 2,000 patients of a HIPAA breach after officials discovered an employee of the health system's third party contractor gained unauthorized access to patients records. The individual was able to access the records for nearly six months before being discovered.

 

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pro Resource from Cloud Central
Scoop.it!

Who's managing your managed services? You, ultimately

Who's managing your managed services? You, ultimately | TSI Chris Traxler | Scoop.it
Managed services aren't magic. Before your provider can provide relief, it will need some help from you

Via Peter Azzopardi
more...
Peter Azzopardi's curator insight, July 28, 2014 5:35 PM

Managed services are ultimately a very useful tool, but they require proper preparation -- they aren't magic.

Scooped by Pro Resource
Scoop.it!

Green Computing: Soon a Necessity and Not an Option - exploreB2B

Green computing is being considered as the mean to take key business decisions nowadays and is evolving like never before. It is being adopted by businesses as one of the technology to develop ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pro Resource
Scoop.it!

The solution to “shadow IT” - AppsTech

The solution to “shadow IT” - AppsTech | TSI Chris Traxler | Scoop.it
The solution to “shadow IT”
AppsTech
“Shadow IT” is the trend for enterprise users making use of IT services that have not been approved by corporate IT.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pro Resource from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
Scoop.it!

Shadow IT is undermining your security | NetworkWorld.com

Shadow IT is undermining your security | NetworkWorld.com | TSI Chris Traxler | Scoop.it

Once upon a time, not so long ago, the IT admin chose exactly what hardware and software would be used by employees. Recent trends like the consumerization of IT and BYOD (bring your own device) have shifted the balance of power, but IT still has to maintain some degree of control over the applications used and where sensitive data is stored. Many users just download apps or start using unsanctioned services, though, and introduce unnceccesary security risks through "shadow IT."

 

McAfee sponsored a study by Frost & Sullivan to investigate the scope and impact of shadow IT--specifically SaaS (software-as-a-service) applications being used by employees without the knowledge or consent of IT--or sometimes in direct contradiction to established IT policies. The study focuses specifically on apps that are used for work functions--not games or personal services.

 

That distinction is important, because it gets to the crux of the issue. Sure, employees will spend time updating Facebook, shopping on Amazon, or killing time with Angry Birds. Those are all activities that should be governed by IT policies, and monitored in some way by the IT admin. However, when an employee identifies a legitimate need that isn't being met by the approved applications and services, and goes rogue to find his or her own solution, it's in the organization's best interests to try and understand why, and figure out how to meet the need rather than just blocking access or banning the service.

 

Shadow IT adds risk and potentially exposes the network or company data to compromise. The worst part is that the IT admin is not even aware that the shadow IT apps are being used, or which ones are being used and by whom, so it's impossible to effectively mitigate the risk and protect the network.

 

The Frost & Sullivan study found that 80 percent of the respondents admit to using non-approved SaaS applications to get their jobs done. That's four out of five employees using apps the IT admin is not even aware of. Based on feedback from the respondents, it seems that a third or more of the apps that are used are actually acquired and used without the consent or oversight of IT.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Pro Resource
Scoop.it!

Explaining Green Computing

When it comes to being green, computing is both part of the problem and part of the solution. This video therefore looks at the environmental aspects of comp...
more...
No comment yet.