Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine
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Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine
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Pregnancy Rate In US Reaches 12-Year Low - Huffington Post

Pregnancy Rate In US Reaches 12-Year Low - Huffington Post | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
Pregnancy Rate In US Reaches 12-Year Low Huffington Post What's happening to Mom: Around this time, your doctor may offer you a triple screen or a quad screen to test for Down syndrome, trisomy 18 (a genetic disorder that infants...
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David Rundle: Senators should back U.N. disability treaty - Kansas.com

David Rundle: Senators should back U.N. disability treaty - Kansas.com | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
Kansas.com
David Rundle: Senators should back U.N. disability treaty
Kansas.com
A year ago this month, the U.S. Senate rejected the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities, 61-38.
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Chicago schools transition _ smooth or rocky? - Appeal-Democrat

Chicago schools transition _ smooth or rocky? - Appeal-Democrat | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
San Francisco Chronicle
Chicago schools transition _ smooth or rocky?
Appeal-Democrat
Luka Riner, 4, looks through books in his new classroom as preschool teacher Sharon Hogan watches in Chicago on Thursday, Sept.
Trisomy18's insight:

Luka in this piece has Trisomy 9 syndrome.  

 

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CDC - Birth Defects, Data and Statistics - NCBDDD

CDC works to identify causes of birth defects and opportunities to prevent them.

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Plastics Chemical BPA May Harm Human Fertility: Study | Philly.com

A chemical used in everything from food-can linings to store receipts might also pose some risk for infertility and birth defects, a new study suggests.

 

Exposure to bisphenol A, or BPA, may disrupt the human reproductive process and play a role in about 20 percent of unexplained infertility, said researchers from Harvard University.

 

In laboratory experiments, they exposed 352 eggs from 121 consenting patients at a fertility clinic to varying levels of BPA.

 

"Exposure of eggs to BPA decreased the percentage of eggs that matured and increased the percentage of eggs that degenerated," said lead researcher Catherine Racowsky, director of the assisted reproductive technologies laboratory at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

 

BPA also increased the number of eggs that underwent an abnormal process called "spontaneous activation" that makes eggs act as if they have been fertilized when in fact they haven't been, Racowsky said.

 

Moreover, many eggs exposed to BPA that matured did so abnormally, increasing the odds for infertility and birth defects such as Down syndrome, she said.

 

Eggs exposed to the highest levels of BPA were the most likely to show these ill effects, the researchers found. Their results are similar to earlier research examining the effect of BPA on animal eggs, they said.

 

Racowsky cautioned that these latest results with human eggs were seen in the laboratory, so whether BPA exposure works the same way in real life isn't known. And the research also found only an association between BPA and infertility and birth defects, not necessarily a cause-and-effect link.

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Signs of Aging, Even in the Embryo

Signs of Aging, Even in the Embryo | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
New research indicates that senescent cells, those that stop dividing, play an important role at both the dawn and dusk of life.

 

In 1961, two biologists named Leonard Hayflick and Paul Moorehead discovered that old age is built into our cells. At the time, many scientists believed that if healthy human cells were put in a flask with a steady supply of nutrients, they would multiply forever. But when Dr. Hayflick and Dr. Moorehead reared fetal human cells, that’s not what they found. Time and again, their cells would divide about 50 times and then simply stop.

 

In fact, it turned out, senescent cells are involved in many of the ravages of old age. Wrinkled skin, cataracts and arthritic joints are rife with senescent cells. When researchers rid mice of senescent cells, the animals become rejuvenated.

 

Given all this research, the last place you would expect to find senescent cells would be at the very start of life. But now three teams of scientists are reporting doing just that. For the first time, they have found senescent cells in embryos, and they have offered evidence that senescence is crucial to proper development.

 

The discoveries raise the prospect that the dawn and dusk of life are intimately connected. For life to get off to the right start, in other words, youth needs a splash of old age.

 

Scott Lowe, an expert on senescence at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center who was not involved in the research, praised the studies for pointing to an unexpected role for senescence. He predicted they would provoke a spirited debate among developmental biologists who study how embryos form. “They’re going to really love it or really hate it,” Dr. Lowe said.

 

While senescence may be a powerful defense against cancer, however, it comes at a steep cost. Even as we escape cancer, we accumulate a growing supply of senescent cells. The chronic inflammation they trigger can damage surrounding tissue and harm our health.

 

In the mid-2000s, William Keyes, a biologist then at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on Long Island, was studying how senescence leads to aging with experiments on mice. By shutting down a gene called P63, he could accelerate the rate at which the mice accumulated senescent cells — and accelerate their aging.

 

To observe the senescent cells, Dr. Keyes added a special stain to the bodies of these mice. To see the difference between these mice and normal ones, Dr. Keyes added the same stain to normal mouse embryos.

Naturally, he expected that none of the cells in the normal mouse embryos would turn dark. After all, senescent cells had been found only in old or damaged tissues. Much to his surprise, however, Dr. Keyes found patches of senescent cells in the normal mouse embryos. Dr. Keyes decided to look again at those peculiar senescent cells in normal embryos. He and his colleaguesconfirmed that cells became senescent in many parts of an embryo, such as along the developing tips of the legs.

 

The researchers, however, found no evidence that the senescent cells in embryos have damaged DNA. That discovery raises the question of how the cells were triggered to become senescent. Dr. Keyes hypothesizes they did so in response to a signal from neighboring cells.

 

Once an embryonic cell becomes senescent, it does the two things that all senescent cells do: it stops dividing and it releases a special cocktail. 

The new experiments suggest that this cocktail plays a different role in the embryo than in the adult body. It may act as a signal to other cells to become different tissues. It may also tell those tissues to grow at different rates into different shapes.

 

Dr. Keyes suspects that the sculpting that senescent cells carry out may be crucial to the proper development of an embryo. Consequently, any disruption to senescent cells may have dire consequences. “Where we see senescence in the embryo is where we see a lot of different birth defects,” he said.

 

For an embryo to develop properly, signals have to be sent to the right places at the right times. The peculiar behavior of senescent cells may help in both regards. If a cell stops growing, it won’t spread too far from a particular spot in an embryo. And by summoning immune cells to kill it, a senescent cell may ensure that its signals don’t last too long.

 

It’s possible, Dr. Keyes speculates, that senescence actually evolved first as a way to shape embryos; only later in evolution did it take on a new role, as a weapon against cancer. “I like the idea that it was a simple process that was then modified,” Dr. Keyes said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Madison Punch's comment, March 24, 2014 7:14 PM
I found this article to be among the coolest I've read from scoop.it. I figured that aging came with the weakening, or rather aging, of the body. Who knew it was basically "installed" into our cells? The end of cell division basically stops the flourishing of the peak of life and begins to fall into aging. Very cool.
Madison Carson's comment, September 1, 2015 8:44 PM
I found this article to be rather cool. I've never heard of some of the cells that they were talking about. I thought that the older you got, the effects of old age would just come with it. But, seeing that old age is in you from the time you were born is very interesting.
andrea luan villa's comment, February 2, 2016 6:58 PM
I didn't know that old age is built into our cells; that very cool. I also didn't know that embryos had senses. this interesting I learned a lot from it.
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Extra chromosome 21 removed from Down syndrome (trisomy 21) cell line

Extra chromosome 21 removed from Down syndrome (trisomy 21) cell line | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it

University of Washington scientists have succeeded in removing the extra copy of chromosome 21 in cell cultures derived from a person with Down syndrome, a condition in which the body’s cells contain three copies of chromosome 21 rather than the usual pair. A triplicate of any chromosome is a serious genetic abnormality called a trisomy. Trisomies account for almost one-quarter of pregnancy loss from spontaneous miscarriages, according to the research team. Besides Down syndrome (trisomy 21), some other human trisomies are extra Y or X chromosomes, and Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18) and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13), both of which have extremely high newborn fatality rates.

 

The targeted removal of a human trisomy, they noted, could have both clinical and research applications. In live births, Down syndrome is the most frequent trisomy. The condition has characteristic eye, facial and hand features, and can cause many medical problems, including heart defects, impaired intellect, premature aging and dementia, and certain forms of leukemia, a type of blood cancer.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Tara Zampardi May
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Ten Steps To Make Your Congregation More Inclusive, Part III

Ten Steps To Make Your Congregation More Inclusive, Part III | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
By: Lisa Friedman We thank Lisa for this three part series on making congregations more inclusive. We encourage you to read part one and part two and then continue reading below. One of the greates...

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Lisa Friedman's curator insight, November 21, 2013 9:16 AM

Keep at it. Inclusion requires intentionality, dedication and perseverance. It is hard work, but it is work that is important, meaningful and satisfying.

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About us | Rare Disease Society of South Africa

The Rare Disease Society of South Africa is a registered NPO for rare diseases & creates awareness about various life threatening rare diseases. Mission Our Objectives. To support and provide practical aid to individuals and ...
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Sannicandro: State helping open doors for developmentally disabled - MetroWest Daily News

Sannicandro: State helping open doors for developmentally disabled - MetroWest Daily News | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
Sannicandro: State helping open doors for developmentally disabled
MetroWest Daily News
Opening college to students with developmental disabilities is a civil rights issue.
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Genetic Testing Leaves More Patients Living in Limbo - Wall Street Journal

Genetic Testing Leaves More Patients Living in Limbo - Wall Street Journal | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
Genetic Testing Leaves More Patients Living in Limbo Wall Street Journal Some other genetic conditions for which doctors are monitoring patients-in-waiting include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, one of the leading causes of sudden death in young...

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Precise timing of hundreds of genetic switches to construct a functional heart from embryonic cells

Precise timing of hundreds of genetic switches to construct a functional heart from embryonic cells | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it

Scientists have revealed the precise order and timing of hundreds of genetic "switches" required to construct a fully functional heart from embryonic heart cells -- providing new clues into the genetic basis for some forms of congenital heart disease.

 

In a study being published online today in the journal Cell, researchers in the laboratory of Gladstone Senior Investigator Benoit Bruneau, PhD, employed stem cell technology, next-generation DNA sequencing and computing tools to piece together the instruction manual, or "genomic blueprint" for how a heart becomes a heart. These findings offer renewed hope for combating life-threatening heart defects such as arrhythmias (irregular heart beat) and ventricular septal defects/

 

"Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defects -- affecting more than 35,000 newborn babies in the United States each year," said Dr. Bruneau, who is the associate director of cardiovascular research at Gladstone, an independent and nonprofit biomedical-research organization. "But how these defects develop at the genetic level has been difficult to pinpoint because research has focused on a small set of genes. Here, we approach heart formation with a wide-angle lens by looking at the entirety of the genetic material that gives heart cells their unique identity."

 

The news comes at a time of emerging importance for the biological process called "epigenetics," in which a non-genetic factor impacts a cell's genetic makeup early during development -- but sometimes with longer-term consequences. All of the cells in an organism contain the same DNA, but the epigenetic instructions encoded in specific DNA sequences give the cell its identity. Epigenetics is of particular interest in heart formation, as the incorrect on-and-off switching of genes during fetal development can lead to congenital heart disease -- some forms of which may not be apparent until adulthood.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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California decides chemical BPA is toxic

California decides chemical BPA is toxic | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
Consumer health advocates have pushed the state Environmental Protection Agency for years to recognize that BPA causes birth defects.

Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
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Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, April 12, 2013 12:05 PM

Breast Cancer Action and the Government Report "The Environment and Breast Cancer" has tied BPA as a toxin associated with breast cancer risk.

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MyGriefAssist : Resources and Information on Coping with Grief

MyGriefAssist : Resources and Information on Coping with Grief | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
A place where you will find a broad range of helpful information on loss and grief.

Via Tara Zampardi May
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Tara Zampardi May's curator insight, June 1, 2013 12:02 AM

Wonderful resource on coping with grief.

Tara Zampardi May's curator insight, June 1, 2013 12:05 AM

Wonderful resource, includes inspiring quotes, useful fact sheets, and education on the grief process.

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Social Security Disability Benefits and Obamacare Penalties

Social Security Disability Benefits and Obamacare Penalties | Trisomy 18 Launches New Online Magazine | Scoop.it
Information regarding applying for social security disability benefits and how the Obamacare or Affordable Care Act will affect you.

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Disabled World's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:48 AM

Those receiving or applying for Social Security #Disability or Supplemental Security Income might wonder how the Affordable Care Act, and particularly the penalties for being uninsured, may affect them. http://www.disabled-world.com/news/america/healthcare/penalties.php

Anthony Castelli's comment, February 4, 2014 7:05 AM
If you get insurance and now can get the medical care you need for you disability you may qualify for disability benefits from social security . Find out if you qualify fast free and easy with Cincinnati attorney Anthony Castelli at http://socialsecuritydisabilityassist.com