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Tweet from @lonelyplanet

Useful round-up of common scams @noirinhegarty Great info graphic to read before you travel this summer #lp http://www.justtheflight.co.uk/images/blog/tourist-scams.jpg … …
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Lonely Planet tweeted a link from its account, which was formerly posted by Noirin Hegarty, a Managing Destination Editor of the Lonely Planet. The infographic characterises 40 tourist scams into different types such as street scams, travelling scams, services scams and even hotel scams. Some of the scams are found worldwide, while others are found in specific countries. This can serve as a quick guide for travellers to ensure what precautions they have to take before visiting a country. Also, it is a good idea to provide the sources for these information since they are related to crime laws and security. 

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Shuyi's comment, July 23, 2014 12:32 AM
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Tweet from @urban_achiever

The newest irritating travel buzzword - the 'statuscation'. Something about holidays and Facebook updates. Stop it now.
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Oliver Smith, Telegraph’s Digital Travel Editor tweeted this on his personal Twitter account. His tweet prompted me and probably other readers as well, to search and find out more information on the term ‘statuscation’. I found that ‘statuscation’ means to publish pre-trip and post-trip status updates on your  social networks, so as to prolong the effects of that holiday trip. There were also a couple of blogposts, though limited, on this newly formed term. 

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University travel: 10 ways students can globe-trot for free - Telegraph

University travel: 10 ways students can globe-trot for free - Telegraph | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
Long summer holidays and exciting new friendships make university a great time to travel – but can you afford it? Lauren Razavi outlines 10 ways students can globe-trot for free.
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Lauren Razavi, a freelance travel writer writes about ten ways where university students can travel the world for free, or at minimised cost. Although these tips are catered to students in the United Kingdom, some of them are relatable to the Singapore context as well. One example listed in the article would be to study abroad in another university, where students get to gain knowledge and at the same time get exposed to the country’s culture. However, to cut costs, students would have to apply for a scholarship or a financial subsidy, which is subject to approval by the university. Applying this to the Singapore context, in most cases a fairly small percentage of students get to study abroad, and the more well-to-do ones usually have an advantage. I feel that it is quite unfortunate for some students, especially those who have great potential but are hampered by financial difficulties. 

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Coming soon? Standing instead of sitting on planes

Coming soon? Standing instead of sitting on planes | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
A new report says "vertical seats" could allow more passengers onto a plane and cut ticket costs. Is it worth it?
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This article introduces the ongoing development of a vertical passenger seat or “standing cabin” in airplanes and its value in terms of cost and capacity. A study conducted by Fairuz Romli, an aerospace engineering professor at the Universiti Putra Malaysia, found that “vertical seats could lead to 21% increased passenger capacity and 44% lower ticket prices”. He further supported this idea by mentioning that this idea could be implemented in domestic flights and flights of shorter durations as it would be equivalent to standing in a bus or train during a journey. This idea is already heavily supported by RyanAir, and could be implemented in the years to come if it passes the security tests.

 

Once again, it is interesting to track the public’s feedback on this issue. Most of them are concerned about the safety issues of vertical passenger seats and feel that the passengers’ safety is still paramount. Besides passing security tests, I think that aviation companies also have to get approval from the public, as ultimately they are the ones who will be taking the flights.  

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Shuyi's comment, July 23, 2014 12:32 AM
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15 Not-So-Obvious Ways To Cure Jet Lag

15 Not-So-Obvious Ways To Cure Jet Lag | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
Astonishing truth: Wearing sunglasses inside is a way to cure jet lag. So is exposing yourself to the outdoors in the afternoon.

We already know we should stock up on sleep, and we already know to stay hydrated, but there have got to be more creat...
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This infographic was created by Thomas Cook travel agency, which is an international travel agency founded by Thomas Cook in 1841 in the United Kingdom. The agency has partnered with TripAdivsor, the world’s largest travel community. With a long history of success, the team at Thomas Cook agency can be considered as the opinion leaders in the world of travel, with their great amount of knowledge and experience on this topic. 

 

Firstly, what I feel is the most effective part is the idea of putting up an infographic itself, as people are more likely to pay more attention to visuals than chunky texts. Each piece of information is accompanied with appropriate images or icons, such as the cartoon images of the woman having symptoms of jet lag. Secondly, the infographic includes the sources of information that the folks at Thomas Cook have used. This is especially useful if a reader wants to view the source or read information pertaining to a certain point in more detail.

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Social Media Tips From The Tourism Pros

Social Media Tips From The Tourism Pros | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
Social media for tourism just got easier with these social media tips from professionals in the tourism industry.
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This blogpost takes on a different angle on travelling; it shows how professionals in the tourism sector make use of social media to promote their tourism brand, service or product. Other than the many articles about travel destinations and tips, this blogpost gives an insight on how tourism companies attract customers and maintain their loyalty through social media. Coming from tourism professionals, tips on using social media for promoting tourism are very much similar to tips for promoting brands in general. They emphasise on the importance of building two way conversations with customers, engaging them in social media while travelling, an active manpower and replying to every feedback that a customer might have about their services. 

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Travelling Well - or not? - Travel Vaccines

Travel Vaccines are a wise idea. Good preparation is one of the secrets to successful journeys.This video is a lighthearted look at a serious subject... how ...
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This video shows the importance of getting travel vaccines before we travel overseas, especially to third-world countries with more serious cases of diseases or infections. As a well-known Malay proverb goes, “prepare your umbrella before it rains”, or the saying “prevention is better than cure”, travellers must understand the importance of being physically prepared for the trip ahead. On top of being equipped with basic medication such as Panadol, Vitamin C and Charcoal tablets, it is crucial to get vaccinated from diseases that are rampant in the countries we are heading to. 

 

As mentioned in the description, this video does present a “lighthearted look at a serious subject”. It is entertaining, but at the same time instills fear in the audiences’ mind, due to the scenes showing the seriousness of each disease. It portrays the seriousness of diseases such as Malaria, Cholera, Rabies and many more. From what I have learnt in other classes, strong fear appeals in messages are most effective when the audience has minimal concern over a certain topic. Although most people are aware of the seriousness of these diseases, most people underestimate the risk of contracting them. Since fear appeals are present in the video, the audience will be persuaded to take action such as get vaccines in advance of their overseas trip.

 

Although this video does not seem very professional, I believe that the information provided is credible since the video creator is an active travel doctor. Dr Deborah Mills is a travel doctor based in Queensland, Australia and has been active in keeping travellers healthy since 1988. She also has a website, blog and updates her followers frequently on Twitter.

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Rise of the Status-cation

Rise of the Status-cation | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
Boom in Brits extending their holiday happiness
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Professionals in the United Kingdom have coined a new term called ‘statuscation’, an effort to use social media by the Brits to “extend their holiday happiness”. In fact, it is already evident in the UK when a research conducted by The Flash Pack travel company found that “84% of Brits regularly use social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to elongate the effects of their breaks abroad.” Unsurprisingly, they would start posting updates once they receive their flight tickets, and them move on to posting photos of the departure gate and airplane window just before takeoff. 

 

I am certain that most tech savvy people can relate to this phenomenon, and there are definitely good and bad sides to it. Fiona Harrold, a top UK life coach, sees the good side of ‘statuscation’ as a way to “keep that positivity going through, almost to the next holiday”. Yet, I feel that there are disadvantages, especially when people spend too much time online during their holiday trip. This group of people would lose out on the essential purpose of travelling - to relax, unwind and just enjoy the surroundings without having to tweet about it.

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Shuyi's comment, July 23, 2014 12:32 AM
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Should Travelers Avoid Flying Airlines That Have Had Crashes in the Past?

Should Travelers Avoid Flying Airlines That Have Had Crashes in the Past? | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
The downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in Ukraine on Thursday, following the disappearance of its Flight 370 in March, is the second mysterious incident involving the airline this year. The inc...
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This article gives an insight into the public’s reactions towards airline safety following a plane crash, and how these reactions could possibly translate into long term mindsets. Nate Silver, the author of this article, studied the safety records for major commercial airlines from the years 1985 to 2014, based on the Aviation Safety Network’s database, in which he provided a link to the original document. He found three different relationships between the different airlines and their rate of fatalities, rate of incidents and rate of fatal accidents. 

 

Firstly, he found that the rate of fatalities by airlines are highly unpredictable, stating the example of Avianca airlines which has experienced many crashes in the past but none since 1999. Also, he found that first-world airlines had fewer crashes in the past. This shows that although Malaysia Airlines is neither a first-world nor a third-world airline, the cause of the crashes could be attributed to a lack of safety regulations, which cost the country more.

 

Despite efforts to prove that there is no correlation between airplane crash incidents, I believe that it still comes back to personal choice. Two plane crashes within the same year would definitely damage the company’s reputation and affect their customers’ choice.

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Shuyi's comment, July 23, 2014 12:32 AM
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The 42 Biggest Travel Don'ts

The 42 Biggest Travel Don'ts | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
In our never-ending quest to not be that traveler when we go abroad, we're always looking for hacks to make sure we're tipping right, ordering right and basically being polite wherever we go.

There are some big taboos you might not be aware of, s...
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This is another useful infographic which summarises travel etiquettes in different parts of the world. As different countries host different cultures, travel etiquettes in these countries also vary. What is deemed as appropriate behaviour in one country may be considered rude in another. One of the unique etiquettes that I have read about is that asking for salt and pepper in Portugal when they are not prepared on the table is an act of taboo. Requesting for seasoning or condiments means to “cast aspersions on the cook”, since the Portuguese are very proud of their cooking. Like this example, some customs or etiquette might seem menial to tourists, but violating them could lead to serious repercussions. 

 

On the other hand, one thing that I have noticed in this infographic is the absence of cited sources. Although it is hard to include sources for all the countries stated, it gives the content more credibility, since most of the content is unique or even unheard of. 

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Shuyi's comment, July 23, 2014 12:32 AM
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10 secret beaches worth discovering

10 secret beaches worth discovering | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
To all the locals who have been hoarding the following beaches, please forgive us.
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This article by CNN provides more information on 10 beaches that are yet to be discovered by many tourists all over the world. Indeed, these beaches are located at less popular tourist spots such as the Zmudowski State Beach in California to the Kauapea Beach in Kauai, Hawaii. The article elaborates on the tourist attractions and activities available at these beaches, with links to other websites or articles to support them. 

 

However, aside from the tourist-related information in the article itself, what I find interesting is the nature of comments by readers at the bottom of the page. Some readers were enraged that their favourite beach spots are now being exposed to tourists from all over the world, while others are concerned about the environmental threat that an influx of tourists could pose onto these beaches and the nature surrounding them. It is interesting to see how people are collaborating their comments and concerns to put forth a common stance, which is to treasure the ‘untouched’ or unpolluted beach spots in the world. This clearly shows the function of Web 2.0, where users could interact and come together under a common mindset. 

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Travel App Can Recommend Places by Looking at Them

Travel App Can Recommend Places by Looking at Them | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
A travel app called Jetpac hopes to tackle two of the most pressing questions of our time: how can machines reliably extract information from images, and what exactly is the definition of a hipster? Jetpac provides a consumer ...
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This new travel application called Jetpac, could possibly revolutionise the use of social media while travelling. Jetpac, founded by Pete Warden and Julian Green, is an application which incorporates the technology of image analysis and data extraction into photos of restaurants and cafes shared publicly on Instagram. Different types of data such as the ambience of the restaurant, type of food and cutlery used, or even the sight of pets can be detected and used to characterise a restaurant, bar or cafe. As stated in the article, this new application is useful because “software that can understand the contents of images could provide valuable new data sources”. Furthermore, the developers of this application also utilise a crowdsourcing tool called Mechanical Turk (MTurk), where they encourage users to include key markers in their photo posts so as to increase the attendance rates in these eateries. Certainly, the team has successfully come up with different ways to make this app work.

 

I feel that this is a novel way to provide quality recommendations to travellers who are looking for good places to eat and drink. As compared to Yelp for instance, the image analysis technology in Jetpac can extract and then provide useful data to traveller automatically. Reviews on Yelp on the other hand, could be faked and paid for by the restaurant owners themselves, and as more people are aware of fake reviews, their trust on sites like Yelp begin to decrease.

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Martha Stewart's 10 Rules for Flawless Travel Will Change Your Life - Yahoo Travel

Martha Stewart's 10 Rules for Flawless Travel Will Change Your Life - Yahoo Travel | Travel tips and insights | Scoop.it
Yahoo Travel
Martha Stewart's 10 Rules for Flawless Travel Will Change Your Life
Yahoo Travel
From baking and decorating to crafts and weddings, Martha Stewart knows how to make most things perfectly.
Nur Amalina's insight:

Martha Stewart’s travelling tips are very useful for frequent travellers, especially those who often go on business trips. Unlike most of the other websites which provide travel tips, Martha’s tips are succinct yet specific and easy to understand. One of her useful tips is the right method of folding our clothes neatly into our suitcase or luggage so as to avoid wrinkles. Some of her advices to travellers are to plan outfits ahead, and to “fold in the shirt’s sleeves, and make a final fold at the bottom to fit inside the suitcase” Although these tips might seem like common sense to all of us, we often overlook these factors when we are packing, especially when we do it in a rush. The examples that I quoted earlier on are especially useful for business travellers who might need to attend a conference or meeting immediately after their flight, and thus have no time to plan an outfit or iron their clothes. Since the point of the article is to provide tips on travelling, it is good to keep the article simple with bulleted points, which allows readers to gain access to information they need easily. I believe that clear and succinct messages will be retained longer in the readers’ minds, as compared to chunky paragraphs including information about travelling.

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Shuyi's comment, July 22, 2014 1:07 PM
OMG GOOD JOB AMALINA I LOVE YOUR INSIGHT