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Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence

Curators Create The Metadata Needed To Enable Our Emerging Collective Intelligence | Transmedia 4 Kids: Creating Content For Children | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Participatory culture writer and book author Henry Jenkins interviews cyberculture pioneer Howard Rheingold (Net Smart, 2012) by asking him to explain some of the concepts that have helped him become a paladin of the  and "new literacies" so essential for survival in the always-on information-world we live in today.

 

This is part three of a long and in-depth interview (Part 2, Part 1) covering key concepts and ideas as the value of "community" and "networks", the architecture of participation, affinity working spaces, and curation.

Here is a short excerpt of Howard response to a question about curation and its value as both a “fundamental building block” of networked communities and as an important form of participation:

 

Howard Rheingold: "...at the fundamental level, curation depends on individuals making mindful and informed decisions in a publicly detectable way.

 

Certainly just clicking on a link, “liking” or “plussing” an item online, adding a tag to a photograph is a lightweight element that can be aggregated in valuable ways (ask Facebook).

 

But the kind of curation that is already mining the mountains of Internet ore for useful and trustworthy nuggets of knowledge, and the kind that will come in the future, has a strong literacy element.

 

Curators don’t just add good-looking resources to lists, or add their vote through a link or like, they summarize and contextualize in their own words, explicitly explain why the resource is worthy of attention, choose relevant excerpts, tag thoughtfully, group resources and clearly describe the grouping criteria."

 

In other words, "curators" are the ones creating the metadata needed to empower our emerging collective intelligence.

 

Curation Is The Social Choice About What Is Worth Paying Attention To.

 

Good stuff. In-depth. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full interview: http://henryjenkins.org/2012/08/how-did-howard-rheingold-get-so-net-smart-an-interview-part-three.html

 

 


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Shaz J's comment, September 3, 2012 3:20 AM
You're welcome :)

It's interesting interesting that you mention POV and stance, as that is not something I had explicitly articulated for myself, but naturally it must be implicitly true. In that sense, it reminds me (again) that curation forces self-reflection in order to present the content better, and that can only be a good thing.
Liz Renshaw's comment, September 8, 2012 9:57 PM
Agree with posts about curation guiding self reflection. This interview in particular is top value and two of my fav people indeed.
Andrew McRobert's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:43 AM

8. This links a series of three interviews quite lengthy but there is some insightful information for the novice in the digital information age. There is video links within the article, including a great question and answer with Robin Good on curation. The video brings a balance to this inclusion.

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Creative Commons Licenses and Attribution: How To Embed Them Inside Your Digital Content

Creative Commons Licenses and Attribution: How To Embed Them Inside Your Digital Content | Transmedia 4 Kids: Creating Content For Children | Scoop.it

Robin Good: JISC provides a very well documented guide to the use of Creative Commons licences (also referred to as CC licences) which can greatly facilitate the copying, reuse, distribution, and in some cases, the modification of the original owner’s creative work without needing to get permission each time from the original rights holder.


In addition to this the correct use and embedding of CC license may greatly help in the effort to make original sources more transparent to the final reader, in many context, including news and content curation efforts of many kinds.


Creative Commons licences can be embedded into a variety of resources, such as PowerPoint, images, Word docs, elearning resources, podcasts and other audio visual resources.


While specifically prepared for UK public sector organizations this document can be quite useful for anyone interested in the use of CC licenses to distribute digital content online.


Key Benefits of embedding CC licences for content curation and attribution:

It can help the user see that the resource is an 'open' resource and licensed under a specific CC licence terms
 It can help reduce the future 'orphan works' (works for which the rights holders are unknown or cannot be traced), and assist in creation of appropriate attribution, citation and potential negotiation for further permissions. By embedding the selected CC licence to the licence details even if the resource gets detached from its metadata. This is particularly the case if the resource is found via a search engine instead of the original website platform which might host specific copyright restrictions.


More info: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/programmerelated/2011/scaembeddingcclicencesbp.aspx ;


(Thanks to Amber Thomas for finding this resource)


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How To Curate Digital Collections and Aggregations | DH Curation Guide

How To Curate Digital Collections and Aggregations | DH Curation Guide | Transmedia 4 Kids: Creating Content For Children | Scoop.it

Robin Good: A valuable resource for anyone interested in the creation, organization and preservation of digital collections for the humanities, is this curated selection of resources and citations made available by the DH Curation Guide.


"The DH Curation Guide is a compilation of articles that address aspects of data curation in the digital humanities.


The goal of the DH Curation Guide is to direct readers to trusted resources with enough context from expert editors and the other members of the research community to indicate to how these resources might help them with their own data curation challenges."


DH Curation Guide: http://guide.dhcuration.org/index.html



Of particular interest in this collection:


The concept of collection from the user’s perspective

by H. L. Lee.


A framework for contextual information in digital collections

by Lee, C. A.


Thematic Research Collections

by Palmer, C. L.


A framework of guidance for building good digital collections

by NISO Framework Advisory Group



Full guide: http://guide.dhcuration.org/collections/

(Image credit: http://www.achome.co.uk/)


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Curation Coming To Television and Film: Channelisation

Curation Coming To Television and Film: Channelisation | Transmedia 4 Kids: Creating Content For Children | Scoop.it

"Jon Miller of News Corp may have predicted 2012 will see the "channelisation" of the web, but he really means a renewed focus on curation..."

 

"Channelisation implies that media corporations such as News Corp will be the ones controlling the playlist of content, but 2012 will see the role of such organisations fall back to providing content for others to turn into a wealth of different “channels” where the barrier to entry essentially falls to zero."

 

Key highlights curated from the article:

 

Curation of niche interest: channelisation

"...opening up of video on demand services from all these channels will allow much smaller organisations to provide cross-channel curation.

 

If the channels who provide the content are still showing their ads before, during and after each show, then curators could start channels focusing on more specific interests and smaller niches than a broadcast channel could do – there will be channels dedicated to crime shows, medical shows, shows with appearances from certain actors, and more.

 

A user will just have to think of a single genre or idea that they want to watch in a show, and there will be a “channel” or that."

 

The curator
"More interesting than the drive to smaller and smaller niches, which could, at least in part, be algorithmically generated – will be the focus on the curator.

 

If a user trusts the taste of a journalist, presenter, blogger or other figure – they may be more interested to watch the content that user picks than the content programmed for any particular channel.

 

...These curators could add to the content by providing commentary from their own knowledge of the content – offering a place where consumers could find a new love."

 

 

Social Curation
"...Equally, groups of curators could join together to offer more regular programming than the one-off playlists of individuals, basically creating “channels” without any of the budget and monetary constraints of a real channel.

 

They would not have to pay for licensing as the content owners will bundle ads with the in-stream content, and so people will curate out of love and interest rather than having to focus on budgetary constraints."

 

Read the full article here: http://www.techfruit.com/2012/01/12/channelisation-curation/ 

(Curated by Robin Good)


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janlgordon's comment, January 12, 2012 4:38 PM
This is great news! I feel like it's Christmas all over again - think of all the possibilities, especiaily the Social Curation where groups of curators get together to offer regular programming. This is my favorite part "so people will curate out of love and interest rather than having to focus on budgetary constraints." My head is spinning, so many ideas flooding my brain, I need to curate my thoughts:-)