Translation Studies, Corpus Linguistics, Academia
4.3K views | +0 today
Follow
Translation Studies, Corpus Linguistics, Academia
Translation and Interpreting Theory and Practice, Corpus Linguistics
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ιoannis Saridakis from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

The fast-changing world of translation technology

The fast-changing world of translation technology | Translation Studies, Corpus Linguistics, Academia | Scoop.it
The fast-changing world of translation technology
posted on Thu, 10/11/2012 - 15:19 by Lingo24

The old image of a translator sitting at a desk with a pile of dictionaries is clearly out of date. Technology is rapidly changing the world of translation and localization. With tools such as Google Translate already handling the equivalent of a million books a year, what will the future of the profession look like?
The TAUS User Conference in Seattle is the best place to find some answers! The Translation Automation User Society, a think tank for the translation technology industry, has the goal of “helping the world communicate better”.
It’s holding the annual event on October 15-16 to bring together leading experts and translation buyers to explore the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. They’ll be presenting the latest developments in automated translation, speech recgonition software, and other technologies.
Machine translation is sometimes seen as a threat to traditional translators. But TAUS experts point out that the growth of automatic tools hasn’t lowered demand for language services. The translation market is still growing fast, and automation helps meet the needs of the global economy.
This year’s conference is titled Agents of Change: The Best of the Best. It takes place at the iconic Edgewater Hotel in Seattle (which hosted the Beatles in 1964 during their first world tour!)
Some of the highlights will include a keynote speech by Chris Prately of Microsoft Labs, and a panel discussion on how translation contributes to a company's success. Speakers will discuss topics such as crowdsourcing and improving the quality of machine translation.
Lingo24’s CEO Christian Arno will be introducing our latest technology, designed to radically improve the work rates of the best (human) translators. His talk, Coaching the Best Professional Translators to Greater Productivity, will focus on its benefits for both linguists and customers.
The two-day event will also include three-minute long “rapid fire” demonstrations of new tools, and an awards ceremony.
If you’re going we’d love to get in touch! Do contact the Lingo24 team on events@lingo24.com. And find out more about some of our innovative technology and translation services.


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ιoannis Saridakis from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Organizing Translation Resources: Three Different Approaches

Organizing Translation Resources: Three Different Approaches | Translation Studies, Corpus Linguistics, Academia | Scoop.it

One key decision that translators using CAT tools have to make is how to organize their resources. By resources I mean primarily translation memories and terminology bases storing one’s legacy translation solutions. The basic approach is creating a single translation memory (TM) and term base (TB) for all projects in a given language combination (for example: English to German, French to Spanish). This is the so-called big momma approach, and it has the obvious advantage of keeping everything in a single place and easy to manage. But it also has the disadvantage of not allowing you full control over the systematic use of a client’s language and style in your translations. A second approach is setting up one translation memory and term base for each domain (for example: legal, business, medical etc.). This gives you more control over how previous translation solutions will be used again – if a term or expression has one translation in corporate language and a different translation in medical language, then you will surely profit from this approach. But it increases your management efforts, i.e. you will need to dedicate an additional amount of your time when moving your resources between tools or even when upgrading your primary CAT tool. A third approach is organizing your resources by client: one TM and one TB for each client. That way, you have full control over how a client’s preferred translations will be used throughout the project and in future projects. This is key in companies with a strong corporate identity or clients who are especially sensitive to the way their products or services are portrayed in their translated materials. Of course, having a TM and a TB for each client (even if it is only for each big client) means a lot more resource management effort on the part of the translator. I don’t think there is one approach that is best for all translators. Rather, I think that translators should consider what their (and their clients’) needs are and then devise a plan to achieve the highest productivity and quality possible. As for me, I prefer to have a mix of the third approach (TMs and TBs for each client) and the second approach (TMs and TBs for each domain), creating client-specific resources only for really big or especially demanding clients, and even then in most cases I use a client-specific TB and a domain-specific TM. I found this to be very productive in my personal case – I work primarily for direct clients and a few translation agencies with higher quality standards. What I don’t find productive at all is the big momma approach, as I work with 3 language combinations, 2 primary domains of specialization with several sub-domains and several occasional working domains. Besides, my preferred CAT tool allows me to use several secondary TMs and TBs for each project and select one of them as the primary resource, so adding resources sent to me by a client or used for other clients/domains is like a breeze. I am sure there are other approaches, though. So, what about you, fellow translators? What method(s) do you have in place to organize your legacy translation solutions?


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ιoannis Saridakis from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

How the Internet has deeply changed the translation activity | Translation Services - News - Blog

How the Internet has deeply changed the translation activity | Translation Services - News - Blog | Translation Studies, Corpus Linguistics, Academia | Scoop.it
The pre-Internet era is now a thing of the past but it has changed the translation activity so much that being a translator in the eighties and before has nothing to do with today’s business.

This is the continuation of Using the Internet in the translation activity – Part 1.

Most translators said that reliability was quite problematic when using online sources because a lot of them have not been peer-reviewed and anybody can publish on the Internet. An article written by an expert is obviously more reliable than an article posted by a layperson. Most translators (50/75; 66.6%) think that online sources are not as reliable as paper sources and assessing their reliability was more difficult. We may suggest that an equivalent should be more reliable if the number of occurrences is significant. For example, an equivalent with 1,000 occurrences may be more reliable than an equivalent with 500 occurrences. This strategy is ‘tricky’ because reliability does not depend on quantitative criteria. Also, the number of occurrences may depend on the research strategy (see the number of results when typing ‘rosace+nucléaire’ and ‘rosace’).

Translators whose languages are rarely spoken and read in their working environment[1] were also asked if they had taken advantage of the web’s potential. The online translation strategies of 52 translators matching this profile were investigated.[2] It was first noticed that these translators did not share the same opinion about the Internet as those working with more ‘common’ working languages (e.g. English, French, German and Spanish). Most of them (40/52; 76.9%) reported that they did take advantage of the Web’s potential but there were still too few online sources written in their ‘rare’ languages. Therefore, they use a lot more paper sources than translators working in ‘common’ working languages. 47.9% (23/48) of the respondents with a ‘rare’ working language said they first used paper sources and most of them (29/45; 64.4%) answered that online sources were not specialized enough. Different answers were given by some translators. Most Danish, Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian translators (10/14; 71.4%) said they were able find enough online sources in their language. The same cannot be said for most Russian and Polish translators; according to them (12/13; 92.3%), the Internet does not provide enough specialized sources in their languages.

The Internet has also deeply impacted other elements of the translation activity. Respondents with a 10-year experience and more in translation said that before the Internet era, purchasing paper sources accounted for a huge part of their investments (23 translators) because specialized sources were more difficult to find than today and having technical books, journals, dictionaries and glossaries was a means to save time. They also added that the Internet had dramatically cut their investments in paper sources. Thirteen ‘young’ translators (in the business for less than 10 years) reported that they did not want to buy and/or keep paper sources because they were able to find everything on the Web.


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.