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Interpreter fees and antitrust legislation and policy worldwide.

Interpreter fees and antitrust legislation and policy worldwide. | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
Once the above is very clear, I would like to revisit this issue that most colleagues usually dodge, and perhaps for good reason. My intention here is to inform my colleagues about the legislation and policy about agreeing as professional service providers to set professional fees. There is a lot of misinformation, and urban legends around. I hope this piece contributes to dissipate some, and to raise awareness on the situation we have and what can be legally done to enact change, if you really want that.

My motivation to write about this issue came from some news I got about certain events in the Czech Republic, where apparently UOHS, the local Czech antitrust authority initiated proceedings against Jednota tlumocniku a prekladatelu (JTP) the main professional association of interpreters and translators in that country, because of the publication of recommended minimum rates for translation and interpreting professional services on their internal journal (reaching about 500 members) arguing there could be a potential violation of Czech antitrust legislation. Shortly after this happened, JTP settled with the authorities and withdrew said recommended rates with an agreement to abstain from publishing them again.

Czech legislation is very similar to prevailing legislation in the European Union, the United States and elsewhere, prohibiting “…agreements (including decisions of associations) containing provisions on direct or indirect price fixing or other business terms and conditions…” This legislation takes generally adopted terminology when it states on a later paragraph that: “… The prohibition… shall not apply to agreements (that) do not afford… the possibility of eliminating competition in respect to a substantial part of the market…”

I sympathize with all my interpreter and translator colleagues in the Czech Republic. I have often questioned the moral justification and ultimate purpose of all antitrust legislation. It comes to us as a gift from the past when legislation such as this was needed to protect regular citizens from colluded corporations and tolerant governments. We could argue those days are gone; that antitrust legislation is necessary in certain cases, but rarely when it comes to a regular individual trying to earn a living selling goods or providing a service as a freelancer.
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11 Surprising Facts About Language

11 Surprising Facts About Language | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
By understanding the range language has, you can develop a better appreciation of the subject overall and prepare your mind for your language program.

(Newswire.net -- August 17, 2018) -- If you’re curious about how to learn Spanish or any other language, then it helps to have an understanding about language in general. Beyond linguistics, grammar, and speech, languages themselves have other unique characteristics. There’s more to fluency than foreign language learning programs. By understanding the range language has, you can develop a better appreciation of the subject overall and prepare your mind for your language program.

There are 7097 Languages that Exist Today

How can there be so many different languages? It’s best to think of language as a tree. There is the main trunk or the base of the language, and it breaks into smaller and smaller branches. These branches are language families and dialects. While 7097 is undoubtedly a lot of languages, this doesn’t mean that many of these languages are widely spoken. Many of these languages only have 10,000 speakers. This means that many are at risk of dying out.

2400 Languages Are Endangered

Thousands of languages are endangered. This happens because of a dwindling population of native speakers for those niche languages. People in these areas gravitate towards popular languages as a means of accessing better jobs prospects, more trade, and greater living. The result is that there is less emphasis placed on learning their native languages. At this rate, roughly 40% of the world languages will disappear within 100 years.

A Language Dies Out Every 2 Weeks

While many languages exist in the world, roughly one goes extinct every two weeks. This is because a handful of people only speak the language. As more and more niche cultures experience the cultural mainstream, their identity gets absorbed into it. Disease and war can also cause a language to die out. Children of native speakers who become bilingual often lose fluency in their native language. Their children will typically learn the language of the culture they grow up in as well. This also leads to a language becoming extinct.

573 Languages Are Extinct

When you think of extinct languages, you might think of dead languages like Latin, Ancient Greek, or Old English. However, there is a difference between an extinct language and a dead language. Dead languages are languages that are still in use despite not having any native speakers. Whereas, extinct languages are languages without a community of native speakers. There are currently over 573 extinct languages.  

Half the World’s Population Use Only 23 Languages

While there may be over 7000 languages currently in use around the world, half of the world’s population only uses 23 languages. In descending order based on the population of native speakers, the top ten of these most spoken languages are Chinese, Spanish, English, Arabic, Hindi, Bengali, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese, and Lahnda.

The Bible Is the Most Translated Book in the World

The most translated book in the world shouldn’t come in as a surprise. The Holy Bible in its entirety has been translated into 650 different languages. However, if you’re counting partial translations, the New Testament has been translated into 1521 different languages as well.  Alice in Wonderland, Tintin, and Harry Potter are also widely translated around the world. The second most translated book on the list is the Little Prince, with over 300 translations. Previously the title had been held by Pinocchio with 260 translations in existence.

Languages with the Biggest and Smallest Alphabets

The language with the largest alphabet is Khmer. Over 8 million people, mainly Cambodians, speak this language worldwide; it has 74 letters.

The smallest alphabet belongs to the language Rotokas with a population of 4300 speakers in Papua New Guinea. This language only has 12 letters in their alphabet.  

Papua New Guinea Has the Most Languages

With a population of under 8 million people, Papua New Guinea has the most diverse collection of language in the world with 856 different languages used throughout the country. For comparison, the US has just over 300 languages used across the nation with a population that is 40 times greater.

Learning a Second Language Can Improve Mental Health

Learning more than one language can improve brain health by increasing brain use. Learning a language requires using your brain to concentrate and focus. And brain use helps brain health. Whether it’s through puzzles or games that require you to think, these activities keep your brain active and fight off degenerative brain conditions. It should come as no surprise to anyone who’s attempted to learn a second language or who already has learned one that there is a great deal of mental effort required to maintain fluency.

The US Has No Official Language

Despite what some may think, English is not the official language of the US. The US has no official language. This doesn’t mean that attempts haven’t been made to make English the official language. However, they have been stopped because it is seen as a clash with the constitution, specifically, the freedom of speech.

The US has a history of cultural diversity dating all the way back to the colonies. And while English was the major language used at the time, there was still a rich history and collection of people from different parts of Europe who had settled there with their own established languages. Pushing English might have jeopardized the colonialists’ willingness to work together.

Welsh Is Used in Argentina

In the mid-1800s, Welsh settlers came to Patagonia, Argentina. They brought with them their language that they still use throughout the area today. Unlike other traditional settlers who traveled in search of fame and fortune or to escape from religious persecution, Welsh immigrants came to Patagonia to keep their culture and language alive. In exchange for the land to create a settlement there to preserve the culture of their people, they agreed to submit to Argentinian rule. Today it holds the highest population of Welsh speakers outside of Wales.  

Language Is Diverse

There are plenty more interesting facts about languages. And understanding the unique history and characteristics of language can help build an appreciation for the vast collection of culture and ideas expressed by them throughout the world. While it’s great to search for a quick way to learn Spanish, it’s also important to know other unique facts about language as well. It’s more than simply trivia, it’s a snapshot of one of the most defining characteristics of what it means to be human.   


Via Charles Tiayon, Sue Clark
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Does the gender pay gap apply to freelancing too? - CMI

Does the gender pay gap apply to freelancing too? - CMI | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
REELANCE PAY IMPROVEMENTS
However, research released on Equal Pay Day in 2017 suggests the gender pay gap for UK freelancers and self-employed is narrowing rapidly. According to data collated by online services platform Bidvine, the last 12 months saw the gender pay gap to just an average of 1.9%. In sectors like photography, music teaching and language tuition, women competing for freelance and self-employed opportunities earned more than men, and won more jobs.
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This is what happens when you stop speaking your native language

This is what happens when you stop speaking your native language | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
The loss of a native language is a phenomenon known as first language attrition. And though it can evoke surprise and at times outrage, first language attrition is becoming all too common as a greater number of people move around the world.
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Article on deaf jurors wins human rights award

A research article arguing that deaf people should be allowed to serve as jurors has been awarded the inaugural Andrea Durbach Award for Human Rights Scholarship.

The article, “Justice is blind as long as it isn’t deaf: excluding deaf people from jury duty – an Australian human rights breach”, was published in the Australian Journal of Human Rights and was inspired by detailed research and by the thousands of deaf people in Australia who are denied the right to perform their civic duty.
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Family of deaf man had to tell him he was dying

Family of deaf man had to tell him he was dying | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it

Man's family had to tell him he was terminally ill as no sign-language interpreter was available.


A health trust has apologised to the family of a deaf man who had to tell him he was dying because a hospital did not provide a sign-language interpreter. The South-Eastern Health and Social Care Trust has paid £7,000 compensation to Thomas Carson's family. He received the news in late 2016 from his daughter, Jillian Shanks. Mr Carson, who has since passed away, was being treated in the Ulster Hospital at the time. 


The family brought a case against the trust, with the support of the Equality Commission, under the Disability Discrimination Act over the trust's failure to provide an interpreter.

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Local college helping to resettle Syrian refugees - Ulster Star

Local college helping to resettle Syrian refugees - Ulster Star | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
SERC’s International Officer Zia Nazar said: “As most refugees arrive with little or no English language experience, SERC have been proactive and delivered formal English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes to the local communities and provided pre ESOL classes for absolute beginners which were tailored to meet their needs to help them integrate into their local community.

“The aim of the event was to help settle the vulnerable refugees into the way of life here, helping to set them up with employment and family cohesiveness, during a time of turmoil. The scale of the Syrian refugee crisis and the challenge of mitigating a ‘lost generation’ of the education of Syrians is a critical one.”
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Children in migration need information on reality, not just on rights, says a new report - Newsroom

Children in migration need information on reality, not just on rights, says a new report - Newsroom | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
Children in migration at all the stages of their journey to Europe should receive child-friendly and understandable information, which nevertheless must reflect the realities and difficulties they may face in the new environment, says the Council of Europe in a new report published today. The most effective way of providing the information is through personal verbal communication with professionally trained people the child trusts; leaflets and print material in clear language should be used as a complementary means; accurate peer-to-peer information should also be promoted.
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URBAN TACTICS; Translating for Parents Means Growing Up Fast - The New York Times

URBAN TACTICS; Translating for Parents Means Growing Up Fast - The New York Times | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
Article on short-term stress, embarrassment and psychological and practical difficulties that sociologists say children of immigrants face by becoming their parents' interpreters; family dynamics become inverted, with children forced to act much older than they are and to seek variety of services for their dependent, and often non-assertive parents; photos (M)
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Language Blog Translation Times: 5 Truths About Court Interpreting

Language Blog Translation Times: 5 Truths About Court Interpreting | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it

Both our interpreting students and beginning court interpreters colleagues pursing certification regularly ask us about what it's really like to be a working court interpreter. As Judy is a federally certified Spanish court interpreter, she is going to (partially, of course) answer this question  with 5 cold, hard truths that you might not have learned at university or during your training. 

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Learn from the Experts! 72 Professional Translators, 139 FREE* Tools to Help You Stay on Top of Your Game

Learn from the Experts! 72 Professional Translators, 139 FREE* Tools to Help You Stay on Top of Your Game | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
139 FREE (or very affordable) tools that will help you be more organised, creative, productive and much more, shared by 72 professional translators.
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Migrants face discrimination within Italian legal system - Lack of interpreters

Migrants face discrimination within Italian legal system - Lack of interpreters | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
Lack of interpreters 

Antigone also noted that one of the major problems faced by foreigners is their lack of Italian language skills and lower awareness of how the judicial system works. ''The right to make use of translators and interpreters should break down these barriers'', but ''despite the fact that regulations call for them in all phases of the proceedings, most of the time they are only present in courtrooms''. 

Moreover, for them ''there is no real verification of their skills since there is no national guild'', and very low pay ''is one of the aspects that affects the quality of the work most and that results in almost no professional interpreters working in courts'' in Italy.
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My job's been called Mickey Mouse probation. I'm now inclined to agree | Public Leaders Network | The Guardian

My job's been called Mickey Mouse probation. I'm now inclined to agree | Public Leaders Network | The Guardian | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
Working for one of the 21 privatised probation firms, I’ve seen cuts, stress, sickness and a rise in violent incidents. Time to end this experiment
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A guide to preparing for court hearings and safety in the Family Court - Check that #interpreter is qualified and professional #NRPSI www.nrpsi.co.uk

Interpreters

If you require language support then you can ask the court to provide an interpreter for your preferred language. The court will pay the interpreter’s fees. This includes sign language interpreters.

You should request the interpreter as soon as possible before the first hearing and check a couple of days before the hearing that it has been arranged. You should also check that an interpreter has been arranged for each subsequent hearing as the court may not automatically do this.
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Is There a Future in Freelance Translation? Let’s Talk About It! | The Chronicle

Is There a Future in Freelance Translation? Let’s Talk About It! | The Chronicle | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
If the demand for translation is increasing, along with opportunities for people with advanced language skills, why are many professional freelance translators...
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Hemoptysis or Hematemesis?—The Importance of Professional Medical Interpretation: A Teachable Moment | Health Care Safety | JAMA Internal Medicine | JAMA Network

All communication about his history had taken place through interpretation by his nephew at this point in his hospital stay, therefore a professional medical interpreter was obtained.
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If Trump Calls Kim Jong Un A ‘Fat Toad,’ His Interpreter Will Have to Translate It

If Trump Calls Kim Jong Un A ‘Fat Toad,’ His Interpreter Will Have to Translate It | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
There will be at least two other people in the room for this historic summit. And the weight of the world is on their every word.
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Lost in translation: interpreters again in the spotlight over serious errors – The Post #Denmark

Lost in translation: interpreters again in the spotlight over serious errors – The Post #Denmark | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
Can’t make head or tail of it
Danish police forces are obliged to use interpreters chosen from an approved list, but the report shows the majority of them don’t satisfy the criteria laid down by the Justice Ministry.

Among other things, the ministry stipulates that interpreters ought to have a long academic education in linguistics or speak the language as their mother tongue – as well as being able to speak and write Danish fluently.

In practice, the burden of evaluating an interpreter’s capabilities falls on the ordinary police officer who is unable to speak the language in question, and that is obviously absurd.

“It’s completely unacceptable that we have a system in which the quality control of interpreters is handed over to a body such as the police force who are quite obviously not up to the task,” said associate professor Tina Paulsen, an expert on interpreters at Aarhus University.
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Judge orders compensation, reclassification for immigration court interpreters #USA

Judge orders compensation, reclassification for immigration court interpreters #USA | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
The company that provides the vast majority of interpreters in immigration courts nationwide illegally retaliated against some of them for organizing and must offer them reinstatement and back pay, a judge for the National Labor Relations Board ruled Monday.
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Oscars 2018: Ex-Hollyoaks star uses sign language in acceptance speech

Oscars 2018: Ex-Hollyoaks star uses sign language in acceptance speech | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
Giving her acceptance speech complete with sign language, Shenton said: "Our movie is about a deaf child being born into a world of silence. It's not exaggerated or sensationalised for the movie.

"This is happening. Millions of children all over the world live in silence and face communication barriers, and particularly access to education.

"Deafness is a silent disability. You can't see it and it's not life threatening so I want to say the biggest of thank yous to the Academy for allowing us to put this in front of a mainstream audience."
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Você gosta de correr riscos? • Como minimizar seus riscos ao contratar uma tradução

Você gosta de correr riscos? • Como minimizar seus riscos ao contratar uma tradução | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it

O seu projeto vai ocupar um tradutor durante um mês, e uma revisora durante quinze dias? Calcule o mínimo para uma pessoa se sustentar (e à família) com dignidade durante um mês e meio. É esse o investimento mínimo de que seu projeto precisa. 

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Find Translators and Interpreters

Find Translators and Interpreters | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it

Find translators and interpreters near you, or post a job and let those who are available contact you. Linguist Directory is a FREE and easily accessible database of professional and experienced freelance translators and interpreters who are ready to help you with your language needs.

Linguist Directory 26 February at 14:53 · It is a common misconception that large outsourcing companies can always provide a higher value to individual clients, or small and medium-sized businesses than smaller language services providers, or individual linguists. The reality often is that large companies have big contracts with big clients who automatically attract a high priority rating. As they usually can’t afford to lose those contracts they often prioritise their large customers to the detriment of smaller businesses. Contrary to that individual linguists and small language services providers often work much harder and create a higher quality content when approached directly by new, or smaller clients as they naturally see it as an opportunity to gain a customer who may come to them again in the future. That is why we started Linguist Directory. To offer convenience, great service and affordable prices to all users of translation and interpreting services and a fairer and more reliable platform for small and medium-sized language services providers. https://linguistdirectory.com/

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Parliamentlive.tv - House of Lords Baroness Coussins' speech in the Lords on the importance of the UK staying in Erasmus+

Parliamentlive.tv - House of Lords Baroness Coussins' speech in the Lords on the importance of the UK staying in Erasmus+ | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it

APPG ModernLanguages ‏ @APPGMFL Feb 27 More Watch Baroness Coussins' speech in the Lords yesterday on the importance of the UK staying in Erasmus+ (4m40s): http://ow.ly/FEml30iDCSz #languagepolicyUK "Ensure that the UK remains a full programme partner and a full member of the Erasmus+ programme in the long term"

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Oscars 2018: What's up for best foreign language film?

Oscars 2018: What's up for best foreign language film? | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
This year 92 nations submitted a film for consideration as Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards - the highest number to date. Reducing these to the final shortlist is a
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Wakanda Is a Fake Country, but the African Language in ‘Black Panther’ Is Real - The New York Times

Wakanda Is a Fake Country, but the African Language in ‘Black Panther’ Is Real - The New York Times | Translation and interpreting news | Scoop.it
Residents of the fantastical black utopia Wakanda speak isiXhosa. It is a South African tongue defined by clicks that alternately sound like sucking teeth and a popping cork.
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Interpreter fees faqs - Do other professions and workers have standard pay rates or minimum fees? Yes

Do other professions and workers have standard pay rates or minimum fees?
Yes. Examples of professions who have set standard pay rates or guidance on minimum fees include the National Union of Journalists, The Association of Professional Tour Guides, BECTU (Media and Entertainment), Equity, The Musicians Union, and NASUWT (the largest teachers’ union). These are but a few of the organisations who have done this type of work.
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