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In-place patient decontamination training | Healthcare IT News

RT @HITNewsTweet: Blog: using social media for disaster preparedness activities http://t.co/hwUvpDU7zu
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A brief piece that discusses In-Place Patient Decontamination training that was broadcast on YouTube. The video is publically available, and the piece touches on the value of having practice and training sessions available for video review when developing an After Action Report by showing the results rather than describing them.

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Measuring Crisis Decision Making for Public Health Emergencies

Measuring Crisis Decision Making for Public Health Emergencies
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Published in: RAND Corporation report to Department of Health and Human Services

Date Published: 2009

Pages: 76 (50 page report plus tables and references)

 

Public health emergencies often involve making difficult decisions, including when to notify the public of threats, when to close schools or suspend public events, when to dispense medication, and how to allocate scarce resources. Yet, public health practitioners often have little experience or training in crisis decision making and can be uncomfortable with the need to make decisions based on often-incomplete information and short time lines. Unfortunately, there are no established tools for identifying, measuring, and improving public health crisis decision making. This technical report describes the development and first generation of a tool to measure key aspects of crisis decision making in public health emergencies based on performance in exercises (e.g., tabletops, functional exercises, full-scale exercises) and real incidents (e.g., outbreaks of waterborne disease). The tool is a paper-and-pencil assessment form that is intended to allow public health practitioners to assess their baseline crisis decision-making capabilities and identify shortfalls and shortcomings that may represent opportunities for internal process improvements. The items in the tool focus on public health crisis decision-making processes that the scientific and practical literatures identify as key “building blocks” of effective crisis decision making. Given the early stage of development, this tool is intended to facilitate improvement, not to test and rate health-department performance for purposes of accountability. This tool should be considered a first generation. Further testing and development will be required before the tool can be used for accountability purposes.

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DelValle Institute's curator insight, October 30, 2013 11:41 AM

Published in: RAND Corporation report to Department of Health and Human Services

Date Published: 2009

Pages: 76 (50 page report plus tables and references)

 

Public health emergencies often involve making difficult decisions, including when to notify the public of threats, when to close schools or suspend public events, when to dispense medication, and how to allocate scarce resources. Yet, public health practitioners often have little experience or training in crisis decision making and can be uncomfortable with the need to make decisions based on often-incomplete information and short time lines. Unfortunately, there are no established tools for identifying, measuring, and improving public health crisis decision making. This technical report describes the development and first generation of a tool to measure key aspects of crisis decision making in public health emergencies based on performance in exercises (e.g., tabletops, functional exercises, full-scale exercises) and real incidents (e.g., outbreaks of waterborne disease). The tool is a paper-and-pencil assessment form that is intended to allow public health practitioners to assess their baseline crisis decision-making capabilities and identify shortfalls and shortcomings that may represent opportunities for internal process improvements. The items in the tool focus on public health crisis decision-making processes that the scientific and practical literatures identify as key “building blocks” of effective crisis decision making. Given the early stage of development, this tool is intended to facilitate improvement, not to test and rate health-department performance for purposes of accountability. This tool should be considered a first generation. Further testing and development will be required before the tool can be used for accountability purposes.

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Integrating a Framework for Conducting Public Health Systems Research Into Statewide Operations-Based Exercises to Improve Emergency Preparedness

Integrating a Framework for Conducting Public Health Systems Research Into Statewide Operations-Based Exercises to Improve Emergency Preparedness
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Published in: BMC Public Health

Date: August 20, 2012

Pages: 10

 

Background: Due to the uncommon nature of large-scale disasters and emergencies, public health practitioners often turn to simulated emergencies, known as “exercises”, for preparedness assessment and improvement. Under the right conditions, exercises can also be used to conduct original public health systems research. This paper describes the integration of a research framework into a statewide operations-based exercise program in California as a systems-based approach for studying public health emergency preparedness and response.

 

Methods: We developed a research framework based on the premise that operations-based exercises conducted by medical and public health agencies can be described using epidemiologic concepts. Using this framework, we conducted a survey of key local and regional medical and health agencies throughout California following the 2010 Statewide Medical and Health Exercise. The survey evaluated: (1) the emergency preparedness capabilities activated and functions performed in response to the emergency scenario, and (2) the major challenges to inter-organizational communications and information management.

 

Results: Thirty-five local health departments (LHDs), 24 local emergency medical services (EMS) agencies, 121 hospitals, and 5 Regional Disaster Medical and Health Coordinators/Specialists (RDMHC) responded to our survey, representing 57%, 77%, 26% and 83%, respectively, of target agencies in California. We found two sets of response capabilities were activated during the 2010 Statewide Exercise: a set of core capabilities that were common across all agencies, and a set of agency-specific capabilities that were more common among certain agency types. With respect to one response capability in particular, inter-organizational information sharing, we found that the majority of respondents’ comments were related to the complete or partial failure of communications equipment or systems.

 

Conclusions: Using the 2010 Statewide Exercise in California as an opportunity to develop our research framework, we characterized several aspects of the public health and medical system’s response to a standardized emergency scenario. From a research perspective, this study provides a potential new framework for conducting exercise-based research. From a practitioner’s perspective, our results provide a starting point for preparedness professionals’ dialogue about expected and actual organizational roles, responsibilities, and resource capacities within the public health system. Additionally, the identification of specific challenges to inter-organizational communications and information management offer specific areas for intervention.

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Emergency Preparation in Early Education Programs

Emergency Preparation in Early Education Programs | Training and Education | Scoop.it
Many families make emergency preparedness a priority in the home, explaining to small children what to do in case of a fire, devising “family reunification plans,” and stocking up on supplies in ca...
DelValle Institute's insight:

A piece based on a Save The Children annual report that graded America's overall family preparedness as "unsatisfactory" while pointing out that only 54% of states (including Washington DC) require detailed plans from child care centers on how to care for children with special health needs in the event of an emergency. An interactive map in the body of the article allows you to view states and their individual requirements. 

 

 

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DelValle Institute's curator insight, October 30, 2013 10:57 AM

A piece based on a Save The Children annual report that graded America's overall family preparedness as "unsatisfactory" while pointing out that only 54% of states (including Washington DC) require detailed plans from child care centers on how to care for children with special health needs in the event of an emergency. An interactive map in the body of the article allows you to view states and their individual requirements.